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Gaudy Night (1935)

por Dorothy L. Sayers

Outros autores: Ver a secção outros autores.

Séries: Peter Wimsey & Harriet Vane (3), Lord Peter Wimsey (12)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaDiscussões / Menções
5,4481481,903 (4.31)1 / 526
Harriet Vane's Oxford reunion is shadowed by a rash of bizarre pranks and malicious mischief that include beautifully worded death threats, burnt effigies and vicious poison-pen letters, and Harriet finds herself and Lord Peter Wimsey challenged by an elusive set of clues.
Adicionado recentemente porbiblioteca privada, Ferg.ma, Chrissylou62, normaleon, blanty, JoeB1934, philcbull, pianistpalm91, JFBCore
Bibliotecas LegadasBarbara Pym, Rex Stout, Anthony Burgess
  1. 50
    A Civil Campaign por Lois McMaster Bujold (PhoenixFalls)
    PhoenixFalls: A Civil Campaign is Lois McMaster Bujold's attempt to replicate Gaudy Night -- with an infusion of Georgette Heyer -- in her long-running Vorkosigan Saga.
  2. 30
    A Monstrous Regiment of Women por Laurie R. King (zembla)
    zembla: Both feature good banter, a mystery set in a mostly-female environment, and a tentative romance between the sleuth protagonists.
  3. 30
    The Late Scholar por Jill Paton Walsh (merry10)
    merry10: The Late Scholar is Jill Paton Walsh's further exploration of Dorothy L. Sayers' themes in Gaudy Night.
  4. 20
    Lucky Jim por Kingsley Amis (kraaivrouw)
  5. 20
    Death Among the Dons por Janet Neel (littlegreycloud)
    littlegreycloud: A murder mystery, an academic setting, an unusual heroine, a knight in shining armour (although John McLeish is more believable than Lord Peter;): check, check, check and check. But most importantly: really good writing.
  6. 32
    A College of Magics por Caroline Stevermer (bmlg)
    bmlg: lively and engaging depiction of the community of women scholars
  7. 10
    Death at the President's Lodging por Michael Innes (themulhern)
    themulhern: "Death at the President's Lodging" is a more fun book about people running about an English college in the 1930s in the middle of the night.
1930s (93)
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Mostrando 1-5 de 148 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
A very intellectually dense mystery. The author includes many references to Latin, Greek and British literature within the witty banter regarding a "poison pen" at Oxford.
While interesting, it made for slow reading. The references did not move the story along, rather the opposite. It did prove that a) The author was an intellectual snob, b) so were her characters.
That being said, it did make a case for early feminism, via the "Life of the Mind".....a brilliant mind is worth developing, even if it resides in a female (or other less respected human being).
Although it was considered very progressive for the time,it hasn't aged well. ( )
  Chrissylou62 | Apr 11, 2024 |
This was my first Dorothy Sayers novel, and I have to say I am a bit in love with Lord Peter Whimsey. What I found very interesting about this novel was its treatment of men and women, and the insightful ways that Sayers explores their thoughts and actions. Peter Whimsey is one of a few token males in this book, and the rest of the characters are mostly women of academic standing at a college in Oxford. They are all developed very well, as is the heroine Harriet Vane. I don't know that I have ever met another character who is as clear headed, emotionally aware, and downright savage as Harriet Vane. If you're going to read it, I recommend starting with Strong Poison and Have His Carcase. ( )
  pianistpalm91 | Apr 7, 2024 |
If I had picked the books for the 1001 Books lists, I would have chosen this book first from this series, I think.
This is a story about a woman very much like the marginally educated Conservatives who vote for and blindly support political men like Donald Trump, and the lengths she would go to to destroy the modern world that she sees as responsible for her husband's poor choices and unfortunate end. This book takes on the issue of women's education and the role of women in society. The story is set in the 1930's as tensions are building on the Continent, and with the effects of Great Depression and WW1 launching more women into roles seen for generations as suitable only for men. Harriet gets to do most of the sleuthing herself in this book, too, while Peter is away dealing with international relations in France and Poland.

In this book, too, it is mentioned that Peter is 45yrs old. He always seems older to me, but he's not actually all that old after all. ( )
  JBarringer | Dec 15, 2023 |
Best crime novel I've ever read ( )
  mrsnickleby | Nov 12, 2023 |
God, this is a weirdly unpleasant book to read. Being set in a 30s Oxford college brings all kinds of class details to the fore that are obviously present in the other books in the series (I mean, the main character is a Lord) but that get shown up in the nitty-gritty. The kind Oxford dons generously take on women who are struggling with widowhood and bringing up children but they can only pay them a pittance because unfortunately the college finances are so difficult while they talk about openings of massive new buildings and gaudy decoration. One woman student comes under suspicion because some of her antecedents were "unrefined". The "scouts", which is an Oxford term for domestic servants apparently, are beneath suspicion because they're too stupid and annoying and need to be locked in at night for their own good.

And for someone who was an Oxford don herself it's strange the seeming contempt she has for the whole concept of a woman being a don. It's presented as if they're inherently weird creatures who've somehow been cut off from a normal life. A character is shown to be struggling with college life and isn't sure they want to do it but was encouraged to do it by her parents, who are both great advocates for women going into spaces they've previously been excluded from. This earns a withering rebuke from Harriet Vane who gets mad that someone like that could have possibly taken a space from someone - "it's alright when men come up and don't really care about the studies" she says. And it's obviously intended as a very unsubtle criticism of feminists of the time - obviously the woman actually wanted to be a cook or a nurse but was prevented from achieving her goals by her dastardly feminist parents! A woman at the college who makes a comment about men wanting to tear down women at college is obviously deeply disturbed with a mania against men. The woman who comes along to do a PhD at the college on a fellowship is treated as having some sort of weird obsession for doing so, even if Harriet Vane seems to like her.

And even in 1935 was it really reasonable to have the Reliable Working Class Man make a comment about "needing a Hitler" to put women in their place and present it in a light hearted way?

There's just a general *meanness* to the book that I don't think really comes across in any of the other books in the series. ( )
  tombomp | Oct 31, 2023 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 148 (seguinte | mostrar todos)

» Adicionar outros autores (68 possíveis)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Dorothy L. Sayersautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Carmichael, IanNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
George, ElizabethIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Juva, KerstiTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Ledwidge, NatachaIlustradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Ludwidge, NatachaIlustradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
McDowell, JaneNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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The University is a Paradise. Rivers of Knowledge are there. Arts and Sciences flow from thence. Counsell Tables are Horti conclusi, (as it is said in the Canticles) Gardens that are walled in, and they are Fontes signati. Wells that are sealed up; bottomless depths of unsearchable Counsels there.

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Harriet Vane sat at her writing-table and stared out into Mecklenburg Square.
[Introduction] I came to the wonderful detective novels of Dorothy L. Sayers in a way that would probably make that distinguished novelist spin in her grave.
[Author's Note] It would be idle to deny that the City and University of Oxford (in aeternum floreant) do actually exist, and contain a number of colleges and other buildings, some of which are mentioned by name in this book.
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'The social principle seems to be,' suggested Miss Pyke, 'that we should die for our own fun and not other people's.' 'Of course I admit,' said Miss Barton, rather angrily, 'that murder must be prevented and murderers kept from doing further harm. But they ought not to be punished and they certainly ought not to be killed.' 'I suppose they ought to be kept in hospitals at vast expense, along with other unfit specimens,' said Miss Edwards. 'Speaking as a biologist, I must say I think public money might be better employed. What with the number of imbeciles and physical wrecks we allow to go about and propagate their species, we shall end by devitalising whole nations.' 'Miss Schuster-Slatt would advocate sterilisation,' said the Dean. 'They're trying it in Germany, I believe,' said Miss Edwards. 'Together,' said Miss Hillyard, 'with the relegation of woman to her proper place in the home.' 'But they execute people there quite a lot,' said Wimsey, 'so Miss Barton can't take over their organisation lock, stock and barrel.'
`Were you really being as cautious and exacting about it as you would be about writing a passage of fine prose?’
‘That’s rather a difficult sort of comparison. One can’t, surely, deal with emotional excitements in that detached spirit’.
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All the children seem to be coming out quite intelligent, thank goodness. It would have been such a bore to be the mother of morons, and it's an absolute toss-up, isn't it? If one could only invent them, like characters in books, it would be much more satisfactory to a well-regulated mind.
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...never again would she mistake the will to feel for the feeling itself.
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Harriet Vane's Oxford reunion is shadowed by a rash of bizarre pranks and malicious mischief that include beautifully worded death threats, burnt effigies and vicious poison-pen letters, and Harriet finds herself and Lord Peter Wimsey challenged by an elusive set of clues.

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