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Djinn Patrol on the Purple Line por Deepa…
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Djinn Patrol on the Purple Line (edição 2020)

por Deepa Anappara (Autor)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
3981849,666 (3.8)40
"Based on a true story--Nine-year-old Jai watches too many reality police shows, thinks he's smarter than his friend Pari (even though she gets the best grades), and considers himself to be a better boss than Faiz (even though Faiz is the one with a job). When a classmate goes missing, Jai decides to use the crime-solving skills he has picked up from TV to find him. He asks Pari and Faiz to be his assistants and together they draw up lists of people to interview and places to visit. But what begins as a game turns sinister as other children start disappearing from their neighborhood. Jai, Pari, and Faiz have to confront terrified parents, an indifferent police force, and their fears of soul-snatching djinns. As the disappearances edge ever closer to home, the lives of Jai and his friends will never be the same again. At times exuberant, at times heartbreaking, Djinn Patrol on the Purple Line traces the unfolding of a tragedy while capturing the fierce warmth and resilience of a community forged in times of trouble"--… (mais)
Membro:mayig
Título:Djinn Patrol on the Purple Line
Autores:Deepa Anappara (Autor)
Informação:Penguin (2020)
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
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Djinn Patrol on the Purple Line por Deepa Anappara

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Mostrando 1-5 de 16 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
This novel won the 2021 Edgar Award for Best Novel. I admit that it was interesting because I received a front-row seat to observe what life might be like in a poor Indian settlement. Jai and his friends Fiaz and Pari are all about 9 or 10 years old. Children begin disappearing from the area where they live. No one, especially not the police, is interested in looking for a 10-year old boy that has disappeared mysteriously. When his friend disappears too, and then a 16-year-old girl and two Muslin twins, it doesn't make any difference to the police and they still don't investigate. Finally, families that have lost loved ones take action, and they are finally being heard. During all this time the three friends are "investigating" what happened to all the missing children. They find themselves in some danger, and when Jai's 12-year-old sister disappears the whole neighbtourhood is in an uproar. The book is written fairly well, but I found it difficult wading through all the foreign terms and language, and all the background noise that was going on all the time in the book, I found I was having trouble following along. Once a book becomes difficult for me to pick up for whatever reason, the author has lost me. I found myself floundering quite a bit during this book. Ms. Anappara's characterization is actually very well done. This being her first novel, that surprised me a bit, and that may have been what made this book win the best novel award. I felt that I got to know little Jai, and I personally experienced some of the anguish that he was going through. According to Ms. Anappora's Afterword, missing children from these poor settlements are very, very common, and the cases are rarely solved. I am pleased to close the covers on this one. My head is still ringing with all the conversations, noises and disturbances. ( )
  Romonko | Aug 31, 2021 |
The whole time I was reading this book I kept thinking of another book. That other book was Behind the Beautiful Forevers, a nonfiction expose of life in a slum in Mumbai. That was a disturbing read and this one, which is fiction, was also disturbing but the ending gave me a more optimistic feeling than Behind the Beautiful Forevers did. Still I couldn't help thinking how awful it would have been in these slums with COVID-19 raging through all of India.

Jai is a nine year old who is obsessed with police shows on TV. So when a boy from his class does not return home and the police don't do anything except to threaten to bulldoze the entire slum Jai decides to become a detective. He enlists his two best friends, Pari (the smartest person in his class) and Faiz (one of the few Muslims in his class). Jai even gets one of the slum dogs to act as a tracker. Then another child goes missing and soon after a 16 year old girl doesn't come home from the bazaar where she works. Hindu extremists decide the Muslims are kidnapping these children and start attacking Muslims in the neighbourhood. The police finally arrest some people all Muslim including Faiz's older brother. When two Muslim siblings disappear it should have resulted in the Muslims release but does not.

The author was a journalist in India and often spent time in slums like this one. She says she "interviewed children who worked as scavengers or begged at traffic junctions, who struggled to study at home because of their difficult domestic circumstances, and who had to drop out of school after being displaced by religious violence. But most of them didn't present themselves to me as victims; they were cheeky and funny and often impatient in the face of my questions." The disappearance of children is widespread in India. "As many as 180 children are said to go missing in India every day." That's the factual underpinning of this book but the first person narrative of Jai makes the story come alive. We in North America have no idea how lucky we are. ( )
  gypsysmom | Aug 23, 2021 |
sad, funny, ( )
  BonnD | Aug 20, 2021 |
Slumdog Detectiving
Review of the Random House Audio audiobook edition (Feb. 4, 2020) of the Chatto & Windus hardcover (Jan. 30, 2020)

I did an almost complete read of the nominees for Best Novel in the 2021 Edgar Awards. It was almost, because I dismissed reading Djinn Patrol on the Purple Line as the title made it seem that it was going to be supernatural fiction, which is a genre that I rarely read and about which I generally have no interest. Of course, Djinn Patrol then went on to win the 2021 Edgar for Best Novel.

See photo at https://pbs.twimg.com/media/E2ga3P9WYAIfqFv?format=jpg
A photograph of one of the historical 1952 Edgar Awards from the Mystery Writers of America (MWA), showing its figure modeled on the features of writer [author:Edgar Allan Poe|4624490]. Image sourced from Twitter.

So when Audible offered Djinn Patrol in a $5 sale on May 26, 2021, I snapped it up immediately. And it turns out that Djinn Patrol isn't supernatural fiction at all. Unfortunately, it also isn't a satisfactory mystery, at least in the sense that a crime is satisfactorily solved by the protagonist(s) and that the reader feels that justice has been done. For me, that is when I call for an [Unsatisfactory Ending Alert]™.

Djinn Patrol is more of a social commentary novel disguised as a mystery novel. 9-year old Jai and his friends Pari and Faiz seek to solve the mystery of the disappearing children from their basti (the Hindi word बस्ती is usually translated as settlement or village, but most outsiders in the novel call it a slum). The corrupt authorities are of no help and obviously the kids are just fumbling away at the investigation with their so-called "Djinn Patrol" detectiving, as Jai believes it is magical spirits that are kidnapping the children. The nickname borrows on a fictional "Police Patrol" TV show that basti dwellers watch. Along the way, the class contrast is seen between the workers of the basti and the so-called "hi-fi" dwellers of a nearby luxury apartment complex. The religious conflicts between Indian Hindi and Muslim is shown as well, with extremists seeking to blame muslims for the kidnappings. The final solution seems to occur almost by chance and hardly provides any answers.

The average rating for Djinn Patrol is in the 4 range, but for the audiobook in my experience it was a 3. This is partly due to the lack of a glossary (Audible does sometimes provide pdf appendices that you can download, but there was no such feature this time). Also the narration is pitched somewhat on the soft-speaking side, an attempt by the adult readers to sound like children. This was especially irritating when I couldn't hear it above the sound of my room fans (I listened to most of this during a 30+ Celsius degrees heatwave). Sidenote: I don't listen to audiobooks on earbuds or headphones as I believe it to be damaging to hearing in the long run.

Anyway, I had to also invest in a paperback copy in order to have the benefit of a 6-page glossary for the numerous Hindi words, which the Canadian McClelland & Stewart paperback edition Djinn Patrol on the Purple Line (May 11, 2021) does provide. Many initial hardcover editions had no glossary at all.

Other Reviews
Djinn Patrol on the Purple LIne is a Careful Study on Indian Society but has a Disappointing Plot by Louis Skye, January 28, 2020. Spoiler Note: This basically describes the entire plot without revealing the exact ending. It does summarize most of what I didn't enjoy as well, although this is based on a print version.

Trivia and Links
There is a book club kit for Djinn Patrol at Random House. The bulk of it is an interview with the author and some recipes. Its 1-page glossary section is completely inadequate. ( )
1 vote alanteder | Jun 19, 2021 |
A nine year old boy fancies himself and his friends as detectives when a boy from their slum disappears. But tensions mount as the police ignore the disappearances and the adults try to protect the children by restricting them. Anappara skillfully portrays the precarious existence of the poor, their hopes and their fears for their children and the religious and class divisions in the society. Since the narrative is set among the children, primarily the boy Jai, the reader is torn between their desire for freedom of movement and their parent's concern for their safety. Girls in particular are constrained by conflict between the traditional roles of helping mothers with housework and childcare and desire to participate in sports, hang out with their friends and study for careers.
  ritaer | Jun 11, 2021 |
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Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Deepa Anapparaautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculated
Aakeel, AntonioNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Patel, HimeshNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Varma, IndiraNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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"Based on a true story--Nine-year-old Jai watches too many reality police shows, thinks he's smarter than his friend Pari (even though she gets the best grades), and considers himself to be a better boss than Faiz (even though Faiz is the one with a job). When a classmate goes missing, Jai decides to use the crime-solving skills he has picked up from TV to find him. He asks Pari and Faiz to be his assistants and together they draw up lists of people to interview and places to visit. But what begins as a game turns sinister as other children start disappearing from their neighborhood. Jai, Pari, and Faiz have to confront terrified parents, an indifferent police force, and their fears of soul-snatching djinns. As the disappearances edge ever closer to home, the lives of Jai and his friends will never be the same again. At times exuberant, at times heartbreaking, Djinn Patrol on the Purple Line traces the unfolding of a tragedy while capturing the fierce warmth and resilience of a community forged in times of trouble"--

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