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Permanent Record por Edward Snowden
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Permanent Record (edição 2019)

por Edward Snowden (Autor)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
8593919,472 (4.29)15
Edward Snowden, the man who risked everything to expose the US government's system of mass surveillance, reveals for the first time the story of his life, including how he helped to build that system and what motivated him to try to bring it down.In 2013, twenty-nine-year-old Edward Snowden shocked the world when he broke with the American intelligence establishment and revealed that the United States government was secretly pursuing the means to collect every single phone call, text message, and email. The result would be an unprecedented system of mass surveillance with the ability to pry into the private lives of every person on earth. Six years later, Snowden reveals for the very first time how he helped to build this system and why he was moved to expose it.Spanning the bucolic Beltway suburbs of his childhood and the clandestine CIA and NSA postings of his adulthood, Permanent Record is the extraordinary account of a bright young man who grew up online - a man who became a spy, a whistleblower, and, in exile, the Internet's conscience. Written with wit, grace, passion, and an unflinching candor, Permanent Record is a crucial memoir of our digital age and destined to be a classic.… (mais)
Membro:bperrotta
Título:Permanent Record
Autores:Edward Snowden (Autor)
Informação:Metropolitan Books (2019), Edition: 1st Edition, 352 pages
Colecções:Keepers
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Informação Sobre a Obra

Permanent Record por Edward Snowden (Author)

Adicionado recentemente porB00kLuvr, biblioteca privada, davidpage, egb22, ab35, WhorfinJohn, Tayledras, obdurateesther
  1. 10
    No Place to Hide: Edward Snowden, the NSA, and the U.S. Surveillance State por Glenn Greenwald (Utilizador anónimo)
    Utilizador anónimo: Das ursprüngliche Buch über die Snowden-Enthüllungen.
  2. 00
    Dark Mirror: Edward Snowden and the American Surveillance State por Barton Gellman (Utilizador anónimo)
    Utilizador anónimo: Another person's point of view while the stories were starting to come together and being written. Barton does say he was contacted before Glenn but Ed does say Glenn was contacted before Barton.
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Inglês (33)  Alemão (3)  Espanhol (1)  Francês (1)  Catalão (1)  Todas as línguas (39)
Mostrando 1-5 de 39 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Snowden’s bombshell leak of NSA’s data collection program in 2013 changed the world forever. Keeping track of every netizen in the world was a sci-fi dream up until then. With the revelation came an unprecedented level of awareness of weaknesses in computer systems and a better understanding of data privacy. While Snowden has been branded as a traitor and ‘whistleblower’ by his government, I personally see him as a selfless hero who sacrificed his career and everything he knew for what he believed in.

He talks about all this in the book, the latter part of which discusses the thought process and the physical processes that went behind collecting data for the leak and how he moved to Hong Kong. However, I found the earlier chapters more interesting, especially the ones that discussed his childhood introduction and later obsession with computers and the Internet. Like him, I grew up in the 90s. Just like him, my first introduction was to game consoles and then later to 486 computers (and later Pentium 2!). And once more like him, I grew up on dial-up Internet.

His thoughts on the ‘wild’, decentralized nature of the early Internet and how it shaped his thinking were very similar to mine. I built personas and interacted with people online where no one would ask for your real name and people would (mostly) treat each other with respect. His views on how malleable the Internet was before corporatization took over were compelling, and I can’t help but agree with him on how the Internet has changed (for the worse) since then.

The chapters on pre-9/11 America were appealing as well, mostly because of how freedom was interpreted back then. His brief stint with the army felt like it was out of a movie, to be honest. Of course, people will read the book for Snowden’s jobs with the CIA and NSA. They don’t disappoint.

I gained a better understanding of Snowden’s feelings towards his country and towards his fellow citizens. These chapters gave insight into the intelligence community and how the American ones flout their own constitution all the time. He explains how these communities work, highlighting their rigid power structures. More than that, he clarifies his rationale for the things he did by connecting it to the US Constitution, highlighting his loyalty but disavowing nationalism.

We live in an increasingly surveilled world. Nothing on your computer or the Internet is private anymore - if you have a file on your computer, NSA has access to it, or that’s what Snowden highlights in the book. Going forward, encryption is the key.

The book was eye-opening and educational. It really resonated with me because of my own experiences with the Internet and just how closely my views are in alignment with Snowden’s, notably towards decentralization. This is a must-read if you’re remotely interested in data privacy, freedom of speech, and the future of the Internet. ( )
  bdgamer | Sep 10, 2021 |
  Pnazemi | Aug 22, 2021 |
Well told personal account of what happened in 2012, and how his life lead up to those events. ( )
  Enno23 | Aug 15, 2021 |
Warning: By reading this book and this review you are probably put on some sort of list that the NSA has (and may have shared with it's allies). I'm not kidding, Ed even mentions this in the book.

This is an autobiography written by Ed, while he may have had a ghost writer help him with some thing it's still in Ed's style.

When I started to read this book, I found the pacing slow. So slow I was considering stopping, but I'm glad I finished it (even if it did take me a while to finish it).

If you kept up with the articles and movies that came out featuring Ed (like Citizenfour, or Snowden) then you most likely already know a good chuck of his story but it's still nice to read it from his point of view and there are many things that aren't covered elsewhere.

It's not a book everyone will enjoy, if you are a fan of Ed or what he has done then consider reading the book. If not then you aren't missing really important.

There are some amazing sentences in this book I want to share (there may be a few spoilers if you haven't heard everything about Ed's life)

"Life only scrolls in one direction, which is the direction of time, and no matter how far we might manage to go, that invisible wall will always be just behind us, cutting us off from the past, compelling us on into the unknown."

"My schoolwork was done on paper with pencils and erasers, not on networked tablets that logged my keystrokes."

"In the absolute worst case, I’d sputter, and my classmates would think I was stupid. Let them. You should always let people underestimate you."

"Technology doesn’t have a Hippocratic oath. So many decisions that have been made by technologists in academia, industry, the military, and government since at least the Industrial Revolution have been made on the basis of “can we,” not “should we.” And the intention driving a technology’s invention rarely, if ever, limits its application and use."

"You might choose to give it up out of convenience, or under the popular pretext that privacy is only required by those who have something to hide. But saying that you don’t need or want privacy because you have nothing to hide is to assume that no one should have, or could have, to hide anything—including their immigration status, unemployment history, financial history, and health records. You’re assuming that no one, including yourself, might object to revealing to anyone information about their religious beliefs, political affiliations, and sexual activities, as casually as some choose to reveal their movie and music tastes and reading preferences."

"our clouds, computers, and phones have become our homes, just as personal and intimate as our actual houses nowadays. If you don’t agree, then answer me this: Would you rather let your coworkers hang out at your home alone for an hour, or let them spend even just ten minutes alone with your unlocked phone?"

"I was carrying one of the big old hulks back to my desk when I passed one of the IT directors, who stopped me and asked me what I needed it for—he’d been a major proponent of getting rid of them. “Stealing secrets,” I answered, and we laughed."

"I’m going to refrain from publishing how exactly I went about my own writing—my own copying and encryption—so that the NSA will still be standing tomorrow."

"Although the deleted file disappears from view, it is rarely gone."

"it was like they were just trying to show me that they already knew everything about me. Of course they did. That was Ed’s point. The gov always knows everything."

"That Volcano Ed was going to destroy everything? But I remember the guide at Kilauea saying that volcanoes are only destructive in the short term. In the long term, they move the world."

"and play games I have to pirate because I can no longer use credit cards."

"I used to worry about the bus and metro, but nowadays everybody’s too busy staring at their phones to give me a second glance. If I take a cab, I’ll have it pick me up at a bus or metro stop a few blocks away from where I live and drop me off at an address a few blocks away from where I’m going." ( )
  Authentico | Jul 17, 2021 |
Quite good, I had wanted to learn more about Snowden and the circumstances surrounding his reveal of the NSA's tactics and his subsequent exile and this book provides both. I enjoyed learning about his family and history, I think it gave good context to his decision to reveal the secrets he did. I'm very impressed by him, I understand why many would consider him a threat and a traitor, but the core explanation and motivations make total sense to me. Nobody has a right to look at my information without a warrant/just cause, yet we seem to willingly allow it, even after his bombshell revelations to the press.

As usual, it seems a small group of dedicated and fearless journalists, lawyers and whistleblowers are trying to do what is right and just and I have to admire that. ( )
  hskey | Apr 20, 2021 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 39 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Snowden liefert einzigartige Einsichten in das Innenleben amerikanischer Geheimdienste: ein Psychogramm der Mitarbeiter/innen und eine Analyse der Strukturen. Beides verbindet der 36-Jährige mit seiner eigenen ungewöhnlichen Geschichte. […] Edward Snowden ist ein Vorbild dafür, was es heißt, sich für Rechtsstaatlichkeit und die eigenen Werte zu engagieren.
 
In the aftermath of 9/11, he joined the US army because he "wanted to show I wasn't just a brain in a jar", and had he not suffered stress fractures during training, he would have become a special forces soldier. Snowden says his greatest regret was his own "reflexive, unquestioning support" for the decision to wage war after the attacks, and how it led to "the promulgation of secret policies, secret laws, secret courts and secret wars". He found out about this parallel world working for different intelligence agencies as a contractor tasked with upgrading their antediluvian IT systems. As the spies pivoted towards cyber espionage, the top brass missed something quite important: "The CIA didn't quite understand. The computer guy knows everything, or rather can know everything." Snowden, it seems, was in a position to access their crown jewels.

[...] He eventually decided his loyalties lay not with the agencies he was working for, but the public they were set up to protect. He felt ordinary citizens were being betrayed, and he had a duty to explain how.
adicionada por Cynfelyn | editarThe Guardian, Nick Hopkins (Sep 14, 2019)
 

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My name is Edward Joseph Snowden.
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I still struggle to accept the sheer magnitude and speed of the change, from an America that sought to define itself by a calculated and performative respect for dissent to a security state whose militarized police demand obedience, drawing their guns and issuing the order for total submission now heard in every city: “Stop resisting.”
The 2008 crisis, which laid so much of the foundation for the crises of populism that a decade later would sweep across Europe and America, helped me realize that something that is devastating for the public can be, and often is, beneficial to the elites. This was a lesson that the US government would confirm for me in other contexts, time and again, in the years ahead.
...the companies themselves are American and are subject to American law. The problem is, they’re also subject to classified American policies that pervert law and permit US government to surveil virtually every man, woman, and child who has ever touched a computer or picked up a phone.
I worked, I was sure of it, for the good guys, and that made me a good guy, too.
...Hiroshima...Nagasaki...Those places are holy places, whose memorials honor the two hundred thousand incinerated and the countless poisoned by fallout while reminding us of technology’s amorality.
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Edward Snowden, the man who risked everything to expose the US government's system of mass surveillance, reveals for the first time the story of his life, including how he helped to build that system and what motivated him to try to bring it down.In 2013, twenty-nine-year-old Edward Snowden shocked the world when he broke with the American intelligence establishment and revealed that the United States government was secretly pursuing the means to collect every single phone call, text message, and email. The result would be an unprecedented system of mass surveillance with the ability to pry into the private lives of every person on earth. Six years later, Snowden reveals for the very first time how he helped to build this system and why he was moved to expose it.Spanning the bucolic Beltway suburbs of his childhood and the clandestine CIA and NSA postings of his adulthood, Permanent Record is the extraordinary account of a bright young man who grew up online - a man who became a spy, a whistleblower, and, in exile, the Internet's conscience. Written with wit, grace, passion, and an unflinching candor, Permanent Record is a crucial memoir of our digital age and destined to be a classic.

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