Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquisar O Sítio Web
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

Humankind: A Hopeful History por Rutger…
A carregar...

Humankind: A Hopeful History (original 2019; edição 2020)

por Rutger Bregman (Autor), Erica Moore (Tradutor), Elizabeth Manton (Tradutor)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
1,3813913,475 (4.22)17
History. Science. Nonfiction. HTML:

From the author of the New York Times bestseller Utopia for Realists, a "bold" (Daniel H. Pink), "provocative" (Adam Grant) argument that our innate goodness and cooperation have been the greatest factors in humanity's success.

If there is one belief that has united the left and the right, psychologists and philosophers, ancient thinkers and modern ones, it is the tacit assumption that humans are bad. It's a notion that drives newspaper headlines and guides the laws that shape our lives. From Machiavelli to Hobbes, Freud to Pinker, the roots of this belief have sunk deep into Western thought. Human beings, we're taught, are by nature selfish and governed primarily by self-interest.

But what if it isn't true? International bestseller Rutger Bregman provides new perspective on the past 200,000 years of human history, setting out to prove that we are hardwired for kindness, geared toward cooperation rather than competition, and more inclined to trust rather than distrust one another. In fact this instinct has a firm evolutionary basis going back to the beginning of Homo sapiens.

From the real-life Lord of the Flies to the solidarity in the aftermath of the Blitz, the hidden flaws in the Stanford prison experiment to the true story of twin brothers on opposite sides who helped Mandela end apartheid, Bregman shows us that believing in human generosity and collaboration isn't merely optimistic??-it's realistic. Moreover, it has huge implications for how society functions. When we think the worst of people, it brings out the worst in our politics and economics. But if we believe in the reality of humanity's kindness and altruism, it will form the foundation for achieving true change in society, a case that Bregman makes convincingly with his signature wit, refreshing frankness, and memorable storytelling.… (mais)

Membro:profpenguin
Título:Humankind: A Hopeful History
Autores:Rutger Bregman (Autor)
Outros autores:Erica Moore (Tradutor), Elizabeth Manton (Tradutor)
Informação:Little, Brown and Company (2020), Edition: Illustrated, 480 pages
Coleções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:****
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Informação Sobre a Obra

Humankind: A Hopeful History por Rutger Bregman (2019)

A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Ver também 17 menções

Inglês (25)  Holandês (11)  Português (1)  Romeno (1)  Todas as línguas (38)
Mostrando 1-5 de 38 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
A great read, I really like a book that makes you think and this one does. It also makes a lot of sense about who were are as humans and why we act the way we do. It also explains why the modern world is what it is! ( )
  ltsmith | Apr 5, 2024 |
Ik ga eerlijk zijn: tijdens het lezen van dit boek gingen dikwijls mijn stekels omhoog en ergerde ik me geregeld aan het belerend toontje, de dominees-moraal, de naïeve eenzijdigheid. Ik vind het best verfrissend dat Bregman tegengas wil geven tegen de cynische, pessimistische kijk op de mens en op hoe we er vandaag voor staan, een negatieve kijk die constant gevoed wordt door de nieuwsmedia en grotendeels ook door de sociale media (één van zijn adviezen is trouwens om zoveel mogelijk weg te blijven van het nieuws en van de socials). Maar hij begaat de fout dat ook te willen bewijzen.
Zijn discours bestaat vooral uit het doorprikken van een aantal van de negatieve vooroordelen over de mens, bijvoorbeeld door vrij harde kritiek op sociale experimenten als het Milgram-experiment of het Stanford Prison-experiment, of door het ontkrachten van de mythe van de Paaseiland-bewoners die elkaar uitmoordden. Hij beschrijft dat allemaal heel vlot en zelfs spannend, alsof hij de eerste en enige is die er in slaagt te onthullen. Quod non: bijna geen enkel aspect dat Bregman aanhaalt is origineel, laat staan dat het het resultaat is van zijn eigen veldwerk. En er worden nogal wat krenten uit de pap gehaald.
Maar goed, misschien ben ik te streng en moet ik vooral waarderen dat hij een aantal negatieve evidenties over de mens in vraag stelt. Wat in elk geval overtuigend overkomt, is dat we de zogenaamde “vernistheorie”, namelijk dat beschaving maar een dun laagje is dat er in crisissituaties vlug afgaat, absoluut niet als dogma mogen nemen. Dat dit meteen bewijst dat “de meeste mensen deugen” (zoals de oorspronkelijke Nederlandse titel luidt) is een ander paar mouwen. Ik vrees dat het uiteindelijk voor eeuwig en altijd om geloof gaat gaan: ofwel geloof je er in, ofwel niet. Want de voorbeelden die hij aanhaalt, zoals de idyllische gevangenissen in Noorwegen of de reclamecampagnes waarmee een einde zou zijn gemaakt aan de FARC-oorlog in Colombia, overtuigen niet helemaal.
Toch wil ik het kind niet met het badwater weggooien. Dit boek bevat een aantal goede ideeën en voorstellen die inderdaad essentieel zijn om een betere wereld te creëren. Dat vertrouwen een veel betere fundament is dan haat, en dat vertrouwen minstens even besmettelijk kan (en moet) zijn, is zulk een verdienstelijk inzicht. Het is een boutade, ik weet het, maar je hebt mensen die altijd zullen vinden dat het glas halfleeg is, en je hebt mensen zoals Bregman die resoluut gaan voor het halfvolle. Van nature behoor ik tot de laatste groep. Het is wellicht de verdienste van dit boek dat het mijn geloof daarin niet aan het wankelen heeft gebracht. ( )
  bookomaniac | Feb 22, 2024 |
Listened to the audio version which was very well done. The book gives you lots of ideas to ponder...I’m still thinking about them. Definitely worth the time to read. ( )
  ellink | Jan 22, 2024 |
This is a great book with a great message, that there isn’t a ton of evidence that “human nature” is evil or that humans are inherently greedy or bad. From the Stanford Prison experiment to war to the Broken Windows theory, the author tackles these and many other pieces of evidence that are often pointed to as proof that people are basically garbage. Instead Bregman argues humans are basically cooperative, social, and good. He argues that we’ve achieved our top of the food chain status today not through our superior intellect or cunning but through our unique ability to be highly, highly social creatures. Additionally the author claims many of modern society’s social ills come from the simple principle that people behave how you expect them to. If you’re raised in a world that sees humans as basically shellfish and one bad day away from a “Purge” movie, you’re going to treat them that way and even develop those behaviors yourself.

While I don’t fully support everything Rutger Bregman has to say in this book (we’ll have to agree to disagree about his stance on punching Nazi’s), I do endorse his overall premise and can’t wait to read some of the works he’s cited. Overall this was a fascinating, read-able work and a bit of much needed hope in a difficult year.
( )
  Autolycus21 | Oct 10, 2023 |
Bregman, nosso centrista honorário, traz mais um livro fácil de ler, voltado para o grande público, que, apesar de soar aqui e ali simplificado e um pouco grosseiro, convence no geral e é bastante interessante. O tema principal circula sobre como é cômodo, psicologicamente e depois socialmente, tomarmos o humano como essencialmente egoísta e a sociedade como um verniz de civilidade. A hipótese de Bregman é que isso seria um nocebo (um placebo ruim), e Rosseau estava certo (embora soe apressado os elogios à fase coletora-caçadora da nossa espécie, ao menos o autor não deixa de comentar os avanços da regulação racional do comportamento). Nessa jornada o autor faz divulgação científica de teses sobre a origem de nossa espécie, seu sucesso (contra neandertais mais fortes e inteligentes), introduz a correlação entre docilidade e inteligência (selecionar docilidade acaba selecionando inteligência, em animais) e nos chama de homus-cachorrinho. Aproveita para convencer-nos o quanto a visão da interação social de O Senhor das Moscas é irrealista, e dá um exemplo similar, mas real, de "garotos perdidos na ilha deserta", aliás, muito mais ensolarado. Desmistifica o bando de charlatões da psicologia comportamental com os controversos experimentos da prisão, da inimizade entre garotos, do aumento de voltagem do choque, consultando a literatura que descreve as condições de aplicação destes. Passeia pela biologia e psicologia atual para apoiar a tese (consistente) de que somos inatamente cooperativos. Por fim, aconselha evitar notícias, esperar o melhor dos outros, prefira a compaixão (mais mediada racionalmente) que a empatia, ser bom etc. E fornece exemplos de iniciativas fofas de sucesso, mas sem ser brega demais, embora às vezes soe esperançoso demais (e sim, democracia participativa porto-alegrense consta lá). ( )
  henrique_iwao | Jul 29, 2023 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 38 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
sem críticas | adicionar uma crítica

» Adicionar outros autores (31 possíveis)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Bregman, Rutgerautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
De Korte, LeonInfographicsautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Dieudonné, CléaIlustradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Dieudonné, CléaContribuidorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Dunnink, HaraldArt directionautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Jonkers, AndreasEditorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Manton, ElizabethTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Medendorp, HarminkeEditorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Moore, EricaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Postma, LeonDesigner da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Tillema, AnneliekeCorrectionautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Van Dam, MartijnDesigner da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em holandês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Locais importantes
Acontecimentos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Epígrafe
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em holandês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
'De mens zal beter worden
als je hem toont hoe hij is.'
- Anton Tsjechov (1860-1904)
Dedicatória
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em holandês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Voor mijn ouders
Primeiras palavras
Citações
Últimas palavras
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Língua original
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em holandês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
DDC/MDS canónico
LCC Canónico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

History. Science. Nonfiction. HTML:

From the author of the New York Times bestseller Utopia for Realists, a "bold" (Daniel H. Pink), "provocative" (Adam Grant) argument that our innate goodness and cooperation have been the greatest factors in humanity's success.

If there is one belief that has united the left and the right, psychologists and philosophers, ancient thinkers and modern ones, it is the tacit assumption that humans are bad. It's a notion that drives newspaper headlines and guides the laws that shape our lives. From Machiavelli to Hobbes, Freud to Pinker, the roots of this belief have sunk deep into Western thought. Human beings, we're taught, are by nature selfish and governed primarily by self-interest.

But what if it isn't true? International bestseller Rutger Bregman provides new perspective on the past 200,000 years of human history, setting out to prove that we are hardwired for kindness, geared toward cooperation rather than competition, and more inclined to trust rather than distrust one another. In fact this instinct has a firm evolutionary basis going back to the beginning of Homo sapiens.

From the real-life Lord of the Flies to the solidarity in the aftermath of the Blitz, the hidden flaws in the Stanford prison experiment to the true story of twin brothers on opposite sides who helped Mandela end apartheid, Bregman shows us that believing in human generosity and collaboration isn't merely optimistic??-it's realistic. Moreover, it has huge implications for how society functions. When we think the worst of people, it brings out the worst in our politics and economics. But if we believe in the reality of humanity's kindness and altruism, it will form the foundation for achieving true change in society, a case that Bregman makes convincingly with his signature wit, refreshing frankness, and memorable storytelling.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Current Discussions

Nenhum(a)

Capas populares

Ligações Rápidas

Avaliação

Média: (4.22)
0.5 2
1 1
1.5
2 3
2.5 2
3 29
3.5 9
4 81
4.5 20
5 96

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 204,409,411 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível