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The Millionaire Next Door: The Surprising Secrets of America's Wealthy (1996)

por Thomas J. Stanley, William D. Danko

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3,413482,752 (3.71)22
"Why aren't I as wealthy as I should be?" Many people ask this question of themselves all the time. Often they are hard-working, well educated middle- to high-income people. Why, then, are so few affluent. For nearly two decades the answer has been found in the bestselling The Millionaire Next Door: The Surprising Secrets of America's Wealthy, reissued with a new foreword for the twenty-first century. According to the authors, most people have it all wrong about how you become wealthy in America. Wealth in America is more often the result of hard work, diligent savings, and living below your means than it is about inheritance, advance degrees, and even intelligence. The Millionaire Next Door identifies seven common traits that show up again and again among those who have accumulated wealth. You will learn, for example, that millionaires bargain shop for used cars, pay a tiny fraction of their wealth in income tax, raise children who are often unaware of their family's wealth until they are adults, and, above all, reject the big-spending lifestyles most of us associate with rich people. In fact, you will learn that the flashy millionaires glamorized in the media represent only a tiny minority of America's rich. Most of the truly wealthy in this country don't live in Beverly Hills or on Park Avenue-they live next door.… (mais)
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What I've noticed about books that are described as 'first in their category' is that many times they contain disappointingly small amounts of information. Why might that be?

In this case, I'd been looking at a few financial independence blogs and reddit threads, and saw this book mentioned a handful of times. I was aware of it previously as one of the first that examined people who became financially 'free' in their lives; "rich people don't buy new cars, just read TMND." What surprised me about this book was the utter lack of new information. After getting 25% in, I had to put it down; you could glean any of this information from a half-decent reddit wiki or introductory blog post on FI. So why do people call it so great?

My theory is that since originally topics like these were uncovering unexplored, fertile ground, readers were so amazed with the revelations that there was enough 'newness' to excuse, or possibly even warrant, such long-winded explanations. But when a category gets more popular and the basic knowledge becomes widespread, returning to the exploratory piece makes it seem dated and unoriginal. The reason it gets recommended is because those in the community doing the recommending did really perceive it as new when it was first released, and remember that experience of reading the book when recommending it to others. Unfortunately, as someone who likely already knows some basics, you won't have this same experience.

In summary, the book presents very little new information in a haphazard and difficult-to-read format of throwing tons of absurdly specific data at you (like answering, "What percentage of Irish-Americans save at least 2x the normal amount of money according to our made-up benchmark?"). It provides less value than you could get from spending 20 minutes reading the reddit financial independence FAQ. Definitely skip this book. ( )
  rsanek | Dec 26, 2020 |
One of the best reads on the topic of personal finance. I do think there's a lot of filler and redundancy in the book that you can just skim. The one main point that the book makes is that you should always live under your means. Which does make sense. If you save an extra $100 every month in less than 30 years that can add up to more than $83,000. The less you use the more you save. I also liked that most of the learnings in the book are not anecdotal but rather based on data obtained through surveys of millionaires.

Other than the "save more" point, the one major startling discovery was that when it comes to wealth, you cannot judge a book by its cover. or in this case a person by the car they drive, the clothes they wear, the phone they have.

One thing that it surprised me, was that the wealthiest individuals spend more time planning their finances. On the one hand being ruthless about knowing where your money goes does make sense but on the other hand I do think that spending a lot of time on your finances backfire. anyways, I'm still undecided on this issue.

I would definitely recommend this book to anyone entering the workforce. I will also definitely be gifting this book to some of my friends. ( )
  krngl | Dec 13, 2020 |
perspective and perceptions

The Millionaire Next Door will turn the image of what most people would consider affluence on its head. I've quickly come to realize that the people who give the appearance of wealth are nearly always under accumulators of wealth (UAWs as they are called in the book), while the vast majority of PAWs (prodigious accumulators of wealth) are inconspicuous in their appearance and lifestyle.
  bennybillings | Sep 24, 2020 |
I believed I read this book 10 years ago...The content is alright but it did not have a significant impact on me. ( )
  Wendy_Wang | Sep 28, 2019 |
I believed I read this book 10 years ago...The content is alright but it did not have a significant impact on me. ( )
  Jason.Ong.Wicky | May 2, 2019 |
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Stanley, Thomas J.autor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Danko, William D.autor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado

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For Janet, Sarah, and Brad -- a million Christmases, a trillion Fourth of Julys
—T. J. Stanley
For my loving wife, Connie, and my dear children, Christy, Todd, and Daniel
—W. D. Danko
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Twenty years ago we began studying how people became wealthy.
The person who said this was the vice president of a trust department.
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"Why aren't I as wealthy as I should be?" Many people ask this question of themselves all the time. Often they are hard-working, well educated middle- to high-income people. Why, then, are so few affluent. For nearly two decades the answer has been found in the bestselling The Millionaire Next Door: The Surprising Secrets of America's Wealthy, reissued with a new foreword for the twenty-first century. According to the authors, most people have it all wrong about how you become wealthy in America. Wealth in America is more often the result of hard work, diligent savings, and living below your means than it is about inheritance, advance degrees, and even intelligence. The Millionaire Next Door identifies seven common traits that show up again and again among those who have accumulated wealth. You will learn, for example, that millionaires bargain shop for used cars, pay a tiny fraction of their wealth in income tax, raise children who are often unaware of their family's wealth until they are adults, and, above all, reject the big-spending lifestyles most of us associate with rich people. In fact, you will learn that the flashy millionaires glamorized in the media represent only a tiny minority of America's rich. Most of the truly wealthy in this country don't live in Beverly Hills or on Park Avenue-they live next door.

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Taylor Trade Publishing

2 edições deste livro foram publicadas por Taylor Trade Publishing.

Edições: 1563523302, 1589795474

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