Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquisar O Sítio Web
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

The Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill:…
A carregar...

The Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965 (edição 2013)

por William Manchester (Autor)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
8681619,067 (4.31)1
Spanning the years of 1940-1965, this third volume in Manchester's monumental biography the Last Lion picks up shortly after Winston Churchill became Prime Minister-when his tiny island nation stood alone against the overwhelming might of Nazi Germany.
Membro:schultzosaurus
Título:The Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965
Autores:William Manchester (Autor)
Informação:Bantam (2013), Edition: Reprint, 1200 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Pormenores da obra

The Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill, Volume III: Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965 por William Manchester

Nenhum(a)
A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Ver também 1 menção

Mostrando 1-5 de 16 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
I originally wanted to read a bio of Churchill because I wanted to know if the story comparing Churchill as a man with many mistresses and Hitler as a man with none, was true. While Churchill isn't blameless* it appears that my initial sense was correct--- the claim is junior high rubbish.

4 stars for the research and for teaching me more about WWII than any other book I have read so far. I found Il Duce's fate particularly interesting. Reid does a good job illustrating the intermingling triumph, uncertainty, fear, and tragedy that the war was.

Here are my thoughts from these last few days:

--If you want to lead a country to do great things(descriptor chosen purposefully) you must be able to do what Churchill did. Faults he had. But he knew how to make language work for him. He knew how to build confidence. He knew how to research. He knew how to focus. Was a politician? Yes. Ever so much so. But his politics were tempered with a healthy morality/belief system.

-- Where does one draw the line at a historical biography between the history and it's influence on the biography? This was as much a history of WWII as it was a compendium of Churchill's travels, thoughts, machinations, and Jock Coville's observations of Churchill. But not every troop movement or General's reasoning behind action or inaction is essential to his life story. I feel that too much is included. Probably a personal preference.

--If you're looking for a biography of Churchill you may want one that devotes equal time to his post-WWII activities. This does not. At 900 pages, he is ousted from the government and 100 pages and 20 years later he is dead. To be sure, he was a driving force in the victory. But a lot of life is lived in 20 years.

*glossed over in the prior book, I believe ( )
  OutOfTheBestBooks | Sep 24, 2021 |
After a lifetime striving to obtain the greatest political office one can achieve, you are faced with one of the greatest military threats your nation as ever had to deal with. The Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965 is the final volume William Manchester’s biographical trilogy that was finished by Paul Reid that covers the five years that define Churchill to the world.

While title of the book indicates that it will cover the last quarter-century of Churchill’s life—and it does—almost 90% covers his tenure in 10 Downing Street from his ascension to Prime Minister through V-E Day almost 5 years to the day. Reid using Manchester’s established research and interviews as well as adding his own follows the path Winston Churchill had to tread both militarily as Britain’s war leader to defend the Home Islands from invasion as well as the outlying possessions that sustained the Home Islands in food and material while getting whatever assistance he can from the United States over the course a year until the German invasion of the Soviet Union followed later by the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Now with powerful allies, though now with another war on the other side of the world, Churchill’s problems were not solved but only multiplied as different strategic and post-war visions from the Soviet Union and the United States as well as their contributions to the overall war effort soon eclipsed that of the British not only in the war but in the eventual peace. The last tenth of the book dealt most with Churchill’s time as leader of the opposition to Attlee’s Labour government that came to power after the July 1945 election while also being considered the greatest statesmen in the world at the same. But once he achieved his goal of obtaining 10 Downing through the ballot box, but ill-health and that change in American and Soviet leaderships sent the rapidly freezing Cold War out of his hands diplomatically while his long-time loyal supporters looked ease him out but not in a way that would cause massive public dissatisfaction of backstabbing him. The last ten years of his life after his resignation are covered in about as many pages with a sadness of the inevitable but how he remained himself until the end.

While the first two volumes of this biographical trilogy gave showcased Churchill’s path towards his “date with destiny”, this was the volume anyone interested in Churchill was interested in. Looking from an American point-of-view at Churchill’s leadership role along with his various decisions and reactions that saw the war from British point-of-view gave a greater scope to the vast conflict, especially in the overall European theater. The personal and political relationships between Churchill to both Franklin Roosevelt and Joseph Stalin on one level to various British and American military commanders on another while also being a political leader on the home front showed the numerous plates that he had to spin, many times without success when it came to various strategic plans especially in Italy and the Balkans the latter of which would shape the early Cold War. Reid and Manchester, from an American point-of-view, took on the myth of Churchill’s opposition to D-Day that Eisenhower and other propagated especially when facts bore out that Churchill’s insistence that Montgomery review the initial plans that resulted in the Overlord plan that took place on June 6 in which Churchill wholeheartedly supported. The surprising fact that the “warmonger” Churchill attempted throughout his second premiership to organize a summit early in the hardening Cold War with the threat of atomic then nuclear war—one with only losers and no winners—beginning to loom large was a surprise and often overlooked.

Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965 portrays the Churchill of 1940 when Britain stood alone in which he is remember by history then follows the rest of his war years in detail, especially how the greatest empire in history at the beginning of the war would be the distant third major war power at the end of it. The research of both William Manchester and Paul Reid brings into focus for the reader the short-term and long-term military decisions Churchill dealt with as well as numerous political realities he had to either fight or acquiesce to throughout the war years and later upon his post-war premiership. ( )
  mattries37315 | Dec 9, 2020 |
Truly excellent biography of the life of Winston Churchill from 1940 until his death. The monumental amount of research, so well arranged, made it obvious that without Winston Churchill's farsightedness, grit, intelligence, and steadfastness WW II would have been lost. Because I have read many history books about WW II, I was familiar with much of the material in this book, but having it organized and told in such a cogent fashion was necessary to a fuller understanding of Churchill's importance and, indeed, his brilliance in so many things. Highly recommended. ( )
  whymaggiemay | May 19, 2018 |
Summary: The third volume of Manchester's biography of Churchill, covering his leadership of England during World War II, and his political and personal life until his death in 1965.

During the 1980's I read and relished the first two volume's of William Manchester's biography of Winston Churchill, and looked forward eagerly, as did many to the next installment covering the critical years of his Prime Ministership during the Second World War. I heard Manchester was struggling to complete the work though in poor health, and then that he had died. But before he did so, he passed along his notes, approximately 100 pages of text, and his blessing on the enterprise, to Paul Reid. In 2012, the long-awaited final volume was published.

Most of this volume (approximately 800 pages) covers the war years. What I noticed was that there was as much war here as there was Churchill, perhaps because it was impossible to understand the character and specific actions of Churchill's leadership except against the canvas of the war. And so we see the miraculous escape from Dunkirk as the British army is routed from the continent, and Churchill's galvanizing speeches as the island girds itself for the invasion that never came. Then there was the Blitz, and Churchill's presence among the ruins, inspiring people by the fact that he was there and he knew. This volume also chronicles the desperate U-boat war in the Atlantic that nearly brought the country to its knees while it struggled alone.

Manchester and Reid show us the development of the complicated relationship between Churchill and Roosevelt, from Churchill's desperation to gain whatever help he could from a neutral U.S., the first flush of the alliance following Pearl Harbor, and the increasingly tense relationship as strategic disagreements develop between the two countries, and different visions for the post-war world based on differing national interests, even as Roosevelt was loosing his slender hold on life. Part of this had to do with their interesting tripartite alliance with Stalinist Russia, which bore the major part of the European struggle, and in turn expected to reap the benefit of its conquests.

Part of the tension had to do with Churchill's complex vision of strategic opportunities as opposed to the pressures placed by both Russia, and the Americans for the main effort of an invasion in France. First there was North Africa, then Sicily, and Italy, and the ever present temptation of the Balkans. Part came from the great fear of a repulse on the beaches, delaying invasions from 1942 to 1943, and finally 1944. On the other hand, it was Churchill who understood the Russian ambitions correctly and that they would hold onto the land that their armies took, in Poland, and throughout Eastern Europe. (Yet one wonders if the outcome in Eastern Europe would have been different with an invasion a year earlier, if it had been successful.)

While the Americans hoped for a warm relationship with Russia following the war, Churchill, now out of office, spoke of "the iron curtain" descending across Eastern Europe. Along with George Kennan's famous telegram, he helped shape the beginnings of the Cold War policies that lasted nearly 50 years and averted a major, and possibly cataclysmic, confrontation. Back in office in 1951, he led his country to research resulting in the H-bomb, and was perhaps the first to enunciate the doctrine of Mutually Assured Destruction (MAD).

The last 250 pages recount not only this history but the public honors, the extensive travels, the personal pursuits of painting and writing and caring for Chartwell and the gradually declining health resulting in his death at 90. Like many great men, we see how his children struggled in his shadow, including son Randolph, and daughters Sarah, who died from the effects of alcoholism, and Diana, who pre-deceased Churchill, dying of a barbituate overdose, ruled as suicide. The authors also refute Lord Moran, who characterized Churchill's final years as a struggle with the "Black Dog" of depression. Only in the final couple years, when his health began to seriously fail was there any hint of this.

This is a portrait of a demanding leader, and yet one who most who served him considered it the high point of their lives. He drove others hard, even as he drove himself harder, sometimes to near death with several bouts of pneumonia as he approached age 70 at the end of the war. He was on the wrong side of history on some things, particularly colonialism, although he also foresaw some of the problems these countries would face in a post-colonial world. He was a man of prodigious intellectual ability and prodigious appetite, who could probably drink anyone under the table. It is also the story of a man of clear vision and resolve, who stood up alone, and led his country to stand alone against the might of the Axis powers, which seemed unstoppable. He helped a country understand that knocked down was not the same as knocked out, and helped them survive long enough for the U.S. to join them.

This is a big book on the life of one who arguably was the greatest leader of the twentieth century. It follows two others of similar size. It might take several months to read all three (this one took me a month), but I think you will be a better person for it. It makes one wonder about the Providence that gave such a man for such a time, and long for such leaders in our own time. ( )
  BobonBooks | Jun 29, 2017 |
Like many reviewers of this book, I read the first two volumes of William Manchester’s proposed three part bio of Winston Churchill, THE LAST LION, many years ago now, and eagerly awaited the final volume, if for no other reason than it covered the part of his life that everyone wanted to read about: his years as Prime Minister and leader of the British Empire during the Second World War. The middle book had ended on May 10th, 1940, the day he took up residence in Number 10, Downing Street, a cliffhanger that truly left us wanting more. Sadly, it would be a very long wait, William Manchester’s health went into decline before he could get started on his final book, and he gave up on the project. Shortly before Manchester died in 2004, he prevailed upon writer Paul Reid to take on the job of finishing his work.

I am happy to say that Reid more than rose to the occasion, and though he does not quite pull off Manchester’s style, he does give us everything we could have hoped for in a biography and more than does justice to the great man himself: Winston Spencer Churchill. For some history buffs like myself, and you know who you are, the very sight of this book with its one thousand plus pages will provoke true joy. We love epic histories that dive deep – very deep – into their subjects.

The third volume of THE LAST LION, subtitled Defender of the Realm 1940-1965, begins with a long preamble, which is a way of catching us up after all this time with the character and nature of Churchill and how he rolled. Then the movie dives into the most dramatic days of World War II, when France went down before the Nazi onslaught and Britain had the choice of fighting on alone or seeking an armistice, where the proud English people would have been forced to submit to whatever terms Hitler gave them. At no time did Churchill consider going hat in hand to Hitler, although certain members to the British establishment thought it was the best course of action. We get the great high points like Dunkirk and The Battle of Britain, and also the behind the scenes maneuvers, as Churchill tries to keep France in the war, wring whatever aid he could get from an isolationist America, and out maneuver his Nazi nemesis. And though things looked very dire for Great Britain, Churchill himself never despaired for his cause, threw himself tirelessly into the fight, clearly taking great pleasure in a task for which he had been preparing for all his life. The British people responded to his leadership and never wavered themselves; they stood their ground behind Churchill and became the first nation in Europe not to submit when confronted by Hitler.

The first 600 pages covers events from the defeat of France to the British victory at El Alamein in North Africa, a turning point in the war. This was when Churchill’s leadership was most tested, as the British Empire suffered a long series of defeats on the European mainland and battled to hold its own in the skies over London, in the Atlantic ocean and in the Mediterranean, where Rommel’s German army threatened to capture the Suez Canal and split the Empire in half Churchill had an ally in Franklin Roosevelt, but it was a very tentative one at first, as FDR took great pains not to get too far ahead of American public opinion, which right up to Pearl Harbor, wanted to stay out of another World War. Hitler’s invasion of the Soviet Union brought another ally to the table, the Communist dictator Joseph Stalin, who never tired of demanding more of an effort to defeat the Nazis from his wartime partners in London and Washington. The second half of the book, when the tide turns and the Allies begin the long march to victory, is bittersweet for Churchill, his goal of destroying Nazism is reached, but at a high cost with the diminishment of the British Empire and the establishment of a Soviet one over half of Europe, both of which Churchill futilely worked very hard to avoid.

This book is a wealth of detail from beginning to end as we learn the technical and logistic problems faced by British pilots during the Battle of Britain; the gross tonnage lost per month to German U-boats in the Battle of the Atlantic and how this nearly defeated Great Britain; how there was no German plan to invade the British Isles in 1940 and how Churchill was confident he could throw back any German force that dared to cross the Channel if Hitler so much as tried. The book makes plain there were a number of good options to defeat Britain short of an invasion, such as cutting Britain off from the oil fields in Iraq and Iran, but that Hitler foolishly ignored them. We get a true sense of what it was like to fight World War II in the moment, with its constantly shifting battlefronts, where who one day’s victory could turn to crushing defeat the next, and where new opportunities to win could always be found if one could be cunning enough to grasp them. Though Churchill was determined to defeat Germany, he was ever wary of the Soviets and was constantly prodding his American allies to adopt a strategy of defeating Hitler by going into Europe through Italy and then into the mountainous Balkans, slogging their way up to Vienna and Berlin, thus simultaneously winning the war and keeping the Soviets at bay. The Americans command, which meant FDR, Dwight Eisenhower, and George Marshall, wanted none of it, preferring to risk a cross channel invasion and a final battle in the flat country of Northern Europe to the long and bloody campaign that Churchill proposed. The American view prevailed, but one wonders how differently the Cold War would have gone if Churchill’s plan had been implemented and the western allies had reached Berlin first.

If the book is dominated by the presence of Churchill, there is a great cast of supporting historic personages including British Chief of Staff Alan Brooke and Field Marshall Bernard Montgomery, two prickly commanders who remained in Churchill’s good graces because they would fight; his loyal Foreign Minister Anthony Eden, who never quite succeeded in escaping the great man’s shadow. The Franklin Roosevelt that emerges here is an intriguer who enjoyed his role on the world stage, a man with far too much confidence in his own abilities, especially when he sat down across a conference table with Stalin; The Russian dictator himself is a steely world player, an ally of wartime convenience who is always seeking a way to strengthen the position and power of the Soviet Union, no matter at who’s expense. The Big Three was not the tight alliance that some history books portray, there was a strong working partnership between America and Britain, while the Soviets, with their 150 divisions, steered their own path, rarely feeling the need to coordinate with their allies. Then there is the Fuhrer, whose crude and evil mind was often so underestimated, but not by Winston Churchill. And always, there is Clementine, his wife, who stood by his side always, even when she and his children came second to his public life.

The book gives little space to the post World War II years, rushing through them as all of it were an anticlimax, including his second term as Prime Minister in the early 1950’s before finally retiring, and to frequent trips on Aristotle Onassis’s yacht. There were several things here that I found interesting, especially Churchill’s fondness for epic war movies like Bridge on the River Kwaii, The Longest Day and The Guns of Navarone; how us movie buffs would love have read a movie review by Winston Churchill, a master of the written English language. I also noticed how his attacks on the British Labour Party’s socialist policies could easily have been given by Ronald Reagan forty years later.

On every page is Churchill’s incredibly large personality; he possessed a nearly super human capacity for work at an age when most men were slowing down, being able to read volumes of paperwork and dictate equal amount in a day; working way into wee hours of the night, with a cigar and brandy always within arm’s reach. His mind was always working, retaining a tremendous amount of information which he put to good use. He could be a tough boss, but it could truly be said that his bark was much worse than his bite…unless you were a Nazi. He was of the upper class always, and his affection for the British Empire and its colonial system would make him anathema to many in the 21st Century, and though he clearly had great affection for the aristocratic Roosevelt, it was plain old Harry Truman from Missouri with whom he had an instant rapport.

.

It can honestly be said that the hardest job in all of human history was winning World War II, and for five years Winston Churchill did with distinction; it can truly be said that he possessed the traits of all great leaders, the ability to thrive on challenge and have no fear of confrontation. It can justly be said that was the 20th Century’s indispensible man. Thank you, Paul Reid, for finishing William Manchester’s great biographical work, it was truly worth the wait.
faeaefr

Like many reviewers of this book, I read the first two volumes of William Manchester’s proposed three part bio of Winston Churchill, THE LAST LION, many years ago now, and eagerly awaited the final volume, if for no other reason than it covered the part of his life that everyone wanted to read about: his years as Prime Minister and leader of the British Empire during the Second World War. The middle book had ended on May 10th, 1940, the day he took up residence in Number 10, Downing Street, a cliffhanger that truly left us wanting more. Sadly, it would be a very long wait, William Manchester’s health went into decline before he could get started on his final book, and he gave up on the project. Shortly before Manchester died in 2004, he prevailed upon writer Paul Reid to take on the job of finishing his work.

I am happy to say that Reid more than rose to the occasion, and though he does not quite pull off Manchester’s style, he does give us everything we could have hoped for in a biography and more than does justice to the great man himself: Winston Spencer Churchill. For some history buffs like myself, and you know who you are, the very sight of this book with its one thousand plus pages will provoke true joy. We love epic histories that dive deep – very deep – into their subjects.

The third volume of THE LAST LION, subtitled Defender of the Realm 1940-1965, begins with a long preamble, which is a way of catching us up after all this time with the character and nature of Churchill and how he rolled. Then the movie dives into the most dramatic days of World War II, when France went down before the Nazi onslaught and Britain had the choice of fighting on alone or seeking an armistice, where the proud English people would have been forced to submit to whatever terms Hitler gave them. At no time did Churchill consider going hat in hand to Hitler, although certain members to the British establishment thought it was the best course of action. We get the great high points like Dunkirk and The Battle of Britain, and also the behind the scenes maneuvers, as Churchill tries to keep France in the war, wring whatever aid he could get from an isolationist America, and out maneuver his Nazi nemesis. And though things looked very dire for Great Britain, Churchill himself never despaired for his cause, threw himself tirelessly into the fight, clearly taking great pleasure in a task for which he had been preparing for all his life. The British people responded to his leadership and never wavered themselves; they stood their ground behind Churchill and became the first nation in Europe not to submit when confronted by Hitler.

The first 600 pages covers events from the defeat of France to the British victory at El Alamein in North Africa, a turning point in the war. This was when Churchill’s leadership was most tested, as the British Empire suffered a long series of defeats on the European mainland and battled to hold its own in the skies over London, in the Atlantic ocean and in the Mediterranean, where Rommel’s German army threatened to capture the Suez Canal and split the Empire in half Churchill had an ally in Franklin Roosevelt, but it was a very tentative one at first, as FDR took great pains not to get too far ahead of American public opinion, which right up to Pearl Harbor, wanted to stay out of another World War. Hitler’s invasion of the Soviet Union brought another ally to the table, the Communist dictator Joseph Stalin, who never tired of demanding more of an effort to defeat the Nazis from his wartime partners in London and Washington. The second half of the book, when the tide turns and the Allies begin the long march to victory, is bittersweet for Churchill, his goal of destroying Nazism is reached, but at a high cost with the diminishment of the British Empire and the establishment of a Soviet one over half of Europe, both of which Churchill futilely worked very hard to avoid.

This book is a wealth of detail from beginning to end as we learn the technical and logistic problems faced by British pilots during the Battle of Britain; the gross tonnage lost per month to German U-boats in the Battle of the Atlantic and how this nearly defeated Great Britain; how there was no German plan to invade the British Isles in 1940 and how Churchill was confident he could throw back any German force that dared to cross the Channel if Hitler so much as tried. The book makes plain there were a number of good options to defeat Britain short of an invasion, such as cutting Britain off from the oil fields in Iraq and Iran, but that Hitler foolishly ignored them. We get a true sense of what it was like to fight World War II in the moment, with its constantly shifting battlefronts, where who one day’s victory could turn to crushing defeat the next, and where new opportunities to win could always be found if one could be cunning enough to grasp them. Though Churchill was determined to defeat Germany, he was ever wary of the Soviets and was constantly prodding his American allies to adopt a strategy of defeating Hitler by going into Europe through Italy and then into the mountainous Balkans, slogging their way up to Vienna and Berlin, thus simultaneously winning the war and keeping the Soviets at bay. The Americans command, which meant FDR, Dwight Eisenhower, and George Marshall, wanted none of it, preferring to risk a cross channel invasion and a final battle in the flat country of Northern Europe to the long and bloody campaign that Churchill proposed. The American view prevailed, but one wonders how differently the Cold War would have gone if Churchill’s plan had been implemented and the western allies had reached Berlin first.

If the book is dominated by the presence of Churchill, there is a great cast of supporting historic personages including British Chief of Staff Alan Brooke and Field Marshall Bernard Montgomery, two prickly commanders who remained in Churchill’s good graces because they would fight; his loyal Foreign Minister Anthony Eden, who never quite succeeded in escaping the great man’s shadow. The Franklin Roosevelt that emerges here is an intriguer who enjoyed his role on the world stage, a man with far too much confidence in his own abilities, especially when he sat down across a conference table with Stalin; The Russian dictator himself is a steely world player, an ally of wartime convenience who is always seeking a way to strengthen the position and power of the Soviet Union, no matter at who’s expense. The Big Three was not the tight alliance that some history books portray, there was a strong working partnership between America and Britain, while the Soviets, with their 150 divisions, steered their own path, rarely feeling the need to coordinate with their allies. Then there is the Fuhrer, whose crude and evil mind was often so underestimated, but not by Winston Churchill. And always, there is Clementine, his wife, who stood by his side always, even when she and his children came second to his public life.

The book gives little space to the post World War II years, rushing through them as all of it were an anticlimax, including his second term as Prime Minister in the early 1950’s before finally retiring, and to frequent trips on Aristotle Onassis’s yacht. There were several things here that I found interesting, especially Churchill’s fondness for epic war movies like Bridge on the River Kwaii, The Longest Day and The Guns of Navarone; how us movie buffs would love have read a movie review by Winston Churchill, a master of the written English language. I also noticed how his attacks on the British Labour Party’s socialist policies could easily have been given by Ronald Reagan forty years later.

On every page is Churchill’s incredibly large personality; he possessed a nearly super human capacity for work at an age when most men were slowing down, being able to read volumes of paperwork and dictate equal amount in a day; working way into wee hours of the night, with a cigar and brandy always within arm’s reach. His mind was always working, retaining a tremendous amount of information which he put to good use. He could be a tough boss, but it could truly be said that his bark was much worse than his bite…unless you were a Nazi. He was of the upper class always, and his affection for the British Empire and its colonial system would make him anathema to many in the 21st Century, and though he clearly had great affection for the aristocratic Roosevelt, it was plain old Harry Truman from Missouri with whom he had an instant rapport.

.

It can honestly be said that the hardest job in all of human history was winning World War II, and for five years Winston Churchill did with distinction; it can truly be said that he possessed the traits of all great leaders, the ability to thrive on challenge and have no fear of confrontation. It can justly be said that was the 20th Century’s indispensible man. Thank you, Paul Reid, for finishing William Manchester’s great biographical work, it was truly worth the wait.
faeaefr ( )
  wb4ever1 | Jun 14, 2017 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 16 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
sem críticas | adicionar uma crítica

» Adicionar outros autores (1 possível)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
William Manchesterautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculated
Manchester, WilliamAutorautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Reid, Paulautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado

Belongs to Series

Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Locais importantes
Acontecimentos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Prémios e menções honrosas
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Epígrafe
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
In freta dum fluvii current, dum montibus umbrae
Lustrabunt convexa, polus dum sidera pascet;
semper honos nomenque tuum laudesque manebunt.

As long as rivers shall run down to the sea,
or shadows touch the mountains slopes,
or stars graze in the vault of heaven,
so long shall your honor, your name,
your praises, endure.

Virgil, Aeneid, I: 607—9
Dedicatória
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
To the memory of
John Colville, C.B., C.V.O 1915-1987
Estonian, Civil Servant, Fighter, Pilot, Scholar
(William Manchester, August 1994)
For Barbara
(Paul Reed, August 2012)
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
On June 21, 1940, the first day of summer, Winston Churchill was the most visible man in England.
Citações
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
(Carregue para mostrar. Atenção: Pode conter revelações sobre o enredo.)
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Língua original
DDC/MDS canónico
Canonical LCC

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

Spanning the years of 1940-1965, this third volume in Manchester's monumental biography the Last Lion picks up shortly after Winston Churchill became Prime Minister-when his tiny island nation stood alone against the overwhelming might of Nazi Germany.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Capas populares

Ligações Rápidas

Avaliação

Média: (4.31)
0.5
1 2
1.5 1
2 2
2.5 1
3 9
3.5 5
4 27
4.5 6
5 56

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 163,312,363 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível