Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquisar O Sítio Web
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

She Who Became the Sun (The Radiant Emperor…
A carregar...

She Who Became the Sun (The Radiant Emperor Duology, 1) (edição 2022)

por Shelley Parker-Chan (Autor)

Séries: The Radiant Emperor (1)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
1,856529,136 (3.96)43
To possess the Mandate of Heaven, the monk Zhu will do anything "I refuse to be nothing..." In a famine-stricken village on a dusty yellow plain, two children are given two fates. A boy, greatness. A girl, nothingness... In 1345, China lies under harsh Mongol rule. For the starving peasants of the Central Plains, greatness is something found only in stories. When the Zhu family's eighth-born son, Zhu Chongba, is given a fate of greatness, everyone is mystified as to how it will come to pass. The fate of nothingness received by the family's clever and capable second daughter, on the other hand, is only as expected. When a bandit attack orphans the two children, though, it is Zhu Chongba who succumbs to despair and dies. Desperate to escape her own fated death, the girl uses her brother's identity to enter a monastery as a young male novice. There, propelled by her burning desire to survive, Zhu learns she is capable of doing whatever it takes, no matter how callous, to stay hidden from her fate. After her sanctuary is destroyed for supporting the rebellion against Mongol rule, Zhu takes the chance to claim another future altogether -- her brother's abandoned greatness.… (mais)
Membro:abidina
Título:She Who Became the Sun (The Radiant Emperor Duology, 1)
Autores:Shelley Parker-Chan (Autor)
Informação:Tor Trade (2022), 416 pages
Coleções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Informação Sobre a Obra

She Who Became the Sun por Shelley Parker-Chan

A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Ver também 43 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 52 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Locus Award
  benrowe05 | Apr 29, 2024 |
#ReadAroundTheWorld. #China #New Zealand

This is the debut work of Shelley Parker-Chan, an Asian-Australian author born in New Zealand. The book has been nominated for many awards including the Hugo Award and British Book Award for Fiction. It is more historical fiction with a touch of fantasy or magical realism than pure fantasy. Beginning in 1345 it is a reimagining of the 1351-1368 Red Turban rebellions in China that led to the overthrow of the Mongol led Yuan dynasty and the establishment of the Ming dynasty.

The main character is Zhu Chongba, a poor village girl who takes on her brother’s identity when he dies, to escape starvation. She is taken into a monastery as a boy novice. Her fierce determination to survive and find greatness is the main theme of the story and sees her become part of the rebel army and meet Ma the General’s daughter.

The second storyline involves General Ouyang, a Han eunuch fighting for the Yuan and secretly in love with Prince Esen. His shame and anger over the death of his family and his own emasculation makes revenge a driving motivation for Ouyang.

The story is well-written and the early and later parts are engaging. It definitely experienced a slump in the middle where I found myself bored. Zhu’s obsession with her quest for greatness is also repetitive and almost monosyllabic with little expansion on this theme. The exploration of gender issues was another theme. I enjoyed the creation of 14th century China but the main character needed more fleshing out for me. 3 stars ( )
  mimbza | Apr 17, 2024 |
*3,5 - 3,8* - but I am not rounding up…

I expected to like this one a lot, so there is quite a mixed bag of feelings here. The setting is great, as the author makes Ancient China come alive, close enough to touch. The relationships between certain characters were cool to watch.
But, but, but:
- I did not find the characters particularly interesting (especially Zhu), they rarely came alive. At times I was quite tired of everybody’s constant suffering (not that they did not have their reasons…).
- Around the middle of the book, I was slightly bored and kept checking how much I had left, a bad sign.
- The writing, generally good, rang false at times. A word here, a sentence there, that made think “some extra editing, if you please.”
This book did not leave me cold - rather, it left me lukewarm…
I have no idea whether I’ll be reading the next book in this series. If I have nothing better to do - maybe. ( )
  Alexandra_book_life | Dec 15, 2023 |
Really interesting and unique story of the power of sheer will and determination. A few things bugged me a bit.

SPOILER ALERT...
- I want to know more about the ghosts
- It annoyed me that we never learn Zhu's actual name, only her patronymic and her brother's name
- I really want to know more about Ouyang ... his life and what happens after ( )
  decaturmamaof2 | Nov 22, 2023 |
In a lot of ways, this book reminded me of the legend of Mulan, a woman who disguises herself as a man to fight the Mongols and expel them from China. However, this story is so much more than that. She Who Became the Sun is a novel about identity, acceptance, familial expectations, and fate. It is a novel that will keep you guessing and leave you in awe.

Our female protagonist is unnamed until she learns that her brother is destined for greatness and so steals his name at his unexpected death. Going primarily by her family name Zhu, the girl navigates her world as a boy, going to great lengths to conceal her identity. She begins working her way up the ranks in the Wuhuang Monastery followed by the army of the Red Turban rebels. Zhu is the definition of 'work smarter not harder'. She is repeatedly given impossible tasks but always manages to achieve them through unusual means.

Zhu spends the majority of the novel shunning her female self. Eventually, she learns that her strength comes, in part, from this side of her. If she wasn't female, she wouldn't have the tenacious desire to survive nor would she be as cunning as she is. In fact, her greatest achievements - the taking of the city of Lu and the Yao River encounter - are not won by masculine behaviors such as fighting. Instead, Zhu uses her intelligence to win the day. In particular, she uses her understanding of the limitations facing women in her society to her advantage as she connects with the other women in her life. Zhu truly sees her female companions and thus truly sees her female readers.

Meanwhile, our other major character of General Ouyang is a foil to Zhu. Unlike Zhu, he is surrounded by family (albeit their ghosts), and he cannot escape his fate while Zhu seeks hers. He acts very much like he has not control over his life while Zhu wants nothing more than to control hers. Ouyang's journey is just as tough and gut-wrenching, even as he succeeds in his goals. Ultimately, I worry about Ouyang because I get the feeling his future is limited because he refuses to accept his duality, or that a duality exists in others. While he was born male, Ouyang was castrated as punishment by the Mongols. As a result, he despises his body and what it is not. He even goes a step further to detest women because they remind him of what they have in common. Whereas Zhu eventually learns that her strength stems from the balance of her identities, Ouyang is trapped in a realm of toxic masculinity.

This book is very light on the fantasy. There are ghosts and bursts of light/flame that come from certain people, but that's about it. Sometimes it didn't feel like a fantasy novel, but that didn't take away from my enjoyment of it at all. I highly recommend this book for its creative storytelling and the fact that it packs an emotional wallop. ( )
  readerbug2 | Nov 16, 2023 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 52 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
"Though Parker-Chan’s unrelentingly grim view of humanity bogs down the middle of the novel, her nuanced exploration of gender identity and striking meditation on bodily autonomy set this fantasy apart."
adicionada por jagraham684 | editarPublisher's Weekly (Feb 11, 2021)
 

» Adicionar outros autores

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Shelley Parker-Chanautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
JungShenArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Naudus, NatalieNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

Pertence a Série

Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Locais importantes
Acontecimentos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Epígrafe
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
All things, O priests, are on fire . . . And with what are they on fire? With the fire of passion, say I, with the fire of hatred, with the fire of infatuation: with birth, old age, death, sorrow, lamentation, misery, grief, and despair are they on fire.
ADITTAPARIYAYA SUTTA; The Fire Sermon
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Zhongli village lay flattened under the sun.
Citações
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Língua original
DDC/MDS canónico
LCC Canónico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

To possess the Mandate of Heaven, the monk Zhu will do anything "I refuse to be nothing..." In a famine-stricken village on a dusty yellow plain, two children are given two fates. A boy, greatness. A girl, nothingness... In 1345, China lies under harsh Mongol rule. For the starving peasants of the Central Plains, greatness is something found only in stories. When the Zhu family's eighth-born son, Zhu Chongba, is given a fate of greatness, everyone is mystified as to how it will come to pass. The fate of nothingness received by the family's clever and capable second daughter, on the other hand, is only as expected. When a bandit attack orphans the two children, though, it is Zhu Chongba who succumbs to despair and dies. Desperate to escape her own fated death, the girl uses her brother's identity to enter a monastery as a young male novice. There, propelled by her burning desire to survive, Zhu learns she is capable of doing whatever it takes, no matter how callous, to stay hidden from her fate. After her sanctuary is destroyed for supporting the rebellion against Mongol rule, Zhu takes the chance to claim another future altogether -- her brother's abandoned greatness.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Current Discussions

Nenhum(a)

Capas populares

Ligações Rápidas

Avaliação

Média: (3.96)
0.5
1 3
1.5
2 7
2.5 4
3 47
3.5 22
4 113
4.5 12
5 69

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 205,736,428 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível