Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquisar O Sítio Web
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

A carregar...

Failure is not an Option: Mission Control from Mercury to Apollo 13 and… (2000)

por Eugene Kranz

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
1,0341914,879 (4.14)19
Gene Kranz was present at the creation of America's manned space program and was a key player in it for three decades. As a flight director in NASA's Mission Control, Kranz witnessed firsthand the making of history. He participated in the space program from the early days of the Mercury program to the last Apollo mission, and beyond. He endured the disastrous first years when rockets blew up and the United States seemed to fall further behind the Soviet Union in the space race. He helped to launch Alan Shepard and John Glenn, then assumed the flight director's role in the Gemini program, which he guided to fruition. With his teammates, he accepted the challenge to carry out President John F. Kennedy's commitment to land a man on the moon before the end of the 1960s. Kranz was flight director for both Apollo 11, the mission in which Neil Armstrong fulfilled President Kennedy's pledge, and Apollo 13. He headed the Tiger Team that had to figure out how to bring the three Apollo 13 astronauts safely back to Earth. (In the film Apollo 13, Kranz was played by the actor Ed Harris, who earned an Academy Award nomination for his performance.) In Failure Is Not an Option, Gene Kranz recounts these thrilling historic events and offers new information about the famous flights. What appeared as nearly flawless missions to the moon were, in fact, a series of hair-raising near misses. When the space technology failed, as it sometimes did, the controllers' only recourse was to rely on their skills and those of their teammates. Kranz takes us inside Mission Control and introduces us to some of the whiz kids--still in their twenties, only a few years out of college--who had to figure it all out as they went along, creating a great and daring enterprise. He reveals behind-the-scenes details to demonstrate the leadership, discipline, trust, and teamwork that made the space program a success. Finally, Kranz reflects on what has happened to the space program and offers his own bold suggestions about what we ought to be doing in space now. This is a fascinating firsthand account written by a veteran mission controller of one of America's greatest achievements.… (mais)
A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Ver também 19 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 19 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Very enjoyable - great to read the behind-the-scenes stories of the unsung heroes who worked at mission control. It was surprising to learn how many glitches there were in practically every mission. To the outsider, it seemed that every mission (with the exception of Apollo 13) was flawless, without any real problems. The people on the ground working with the astronauts really made the missions work and achieve their objectives. My favorite take-away: the people on the ground came up with options that provided time to solve the thorny problems that they encountered on a flight. ( )
  tgraettinger | Feb 21, 2021 |
Although the writing style frequently leaves something to be desired, this was a fascinating look at Mission Control during the golden era of space flight. I especially appreciated the overarching view of how we got to where we are. ( )
  LACbooks | Dec 22, 2020 |
This book is a lot more than just a rehash of Apollo 13. In fact, it discusses pretty much all of the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo missions (but mostly the ones that Gene Kranz was flight director for). I appreciated how each mission was made interesting by the narrative, even if they were flights that have otherwise been pretty much forgotten. In less capable hands, this would have been a monotonous, boring book. It wasn't. ( )
  lemontwist | Apr 5, 2020 |
Fair to middlin' technical treatise on the history of USA space flight program. In the first few pages, I was bored by the technobabble and skipped to the pieces that interested me: Apollo 11, 13 and the end. There is a bit of political wrangling about the loss of the space program. Throughout the memoir, Kranz stressed the value of hard work, integrity, and teamwork-- an excellent takeaway for the book. ( )
  buffalogr | Sep 7, 2019 |
FAILURE IS NOT AN OPTION
Gene Kranz

You don’t get much more eyewitness-to-history than Gene Kranz. As a member (later leader) of the Mission Control team for America’s space program, Kranz participated in every Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo launch, from the humiliating failures of the early Mercury tests through the heart-pounding Apollo 13 journey, to the demoralizing end of our active participation in manned exploration of space.

Kranz has a straight-up style, and the book’s only real flaw is that it may be overpacked with detail. In his attempt to ensure that every member of the ground and flight teams are acknowledged, and the technical details of the missions explained, there are a lot of names swimming around in the alphabet-soup of program acronyms.

The reader who can get through those gets a front-row seat to the missions, including descriptions of mission- (and life-) threatening glitches and problems solved on the fly. Most of the American public, even those of us who followed the flights with great interest, had no idea of problems that didn’t rise to the Apollo-13 level of magnitude.

As the Apollo program itself draws to an end, the emotional impact of the book strikes a deep and troubling chord. Kranz does a bit of soap-boxing at the end, acknowledging the short-sightedness of allowing apathy and changes in political support to fritter away the momentum we had at the height of the program. It remains one of the most devastating events in human history that we, as a country, turned away from space exploration and research just as we had battered the door open.

The shuttle and space station missions are not within the purview of Kranz’ book and so are not addressed. While undoubtedly providing valuable information, neither has the impact of the moon landings, and it’s heartbreaking to recognize what we lost.

Kranz’ viewpoint is a valuable part of the history of America’s man-in-space program, and an enthralling read as well. ( )
  LyndaInOregon | Jul 23, 2019 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 19 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
sem críticas | adicionar uma crítica
Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Locais importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Acontecimentos importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Filmes relacionados
Prémios e menções honrosas
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
With love to my wife, Marta, and our children, Carmen, Lucy, Joan, Mark, Bridid, and Jean
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
"Houston, we have a problem."
Citações
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
(Carregue para mostrar. Atenção: Pode conter revelações sobre o enredo.)
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Língua original
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
DDC/MDS canónico
Gene Kranz was present at the creation of America's manned space program and was a key player in it for three decades. As a flight director in NASA's Mission Control, Kranz witnessed firsthand the making of history. He participated in the space program from the early days of the Mercury program to the last Apollo mission, and beyond. He endured the disastrous first years when rockets blew up and the United States seemed to fall further behind the Soviet Union in the space race. He helped to launch Alan Shepard and John Glenn, then assumed the flight director's role in the Gemini program, which he guided to fruition. With his teammates, he accepted the challenge to carry out President John F. Kennedy's commitment to land a man on the moon before the end of the 1960s. Kranz was flight director for both Apollo 11, the mission in which Neil Armstrong fulfilled President Kennedy's pledge, and Apollo 13. He headed the Tiger Team that had to figure out how to bring the three Apollo 13 astronauts safely back to Earth. (In the film Apollo 13, Kranz was played by the actor Ed Harris, who earned an Academy Award nomination for his performance.) In Failure Is Not an Option, Gene Kranz recounts these thrilling historic events and offers new information about the famous flights. What appeared as nearly flawless missions to the moon were, in fact, a series of hair-raising near misses. When the space technology failed, as it sometimes did, the controllers' only recourse was to rely on their skills and those of their teammates. Kranz takes us inside Mission Control and introduces us to some of the whiz kids--still in their twenties, only a few years out of college--who had to figure it all out as they went along, creating a great and daring enterprise. He reveals behind-the-scenes details to demonstrate the leadership, discipline, trust, and teamwork that made the space program a success. Finally, Kranz reflects on what has happened to the space program and offers his own bold suggestions about what we ought to be doing in space now. This is a fascinating firsthand account written by a veteran mission controller of one of America's greatest achievements.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Ligações Rápidas

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (4.14)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 4
2.5
3 24
3.5 5
4 66
4.5 12
5 55

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 160,715,635 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível