Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquisar O Sítio Web
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

A carregar...

A Terrible Kindness

por Jo Browning Wroe

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
1403192,614 (4.3)7
It is October 1966 and William Lavery is having the night of his life at his first black-tie do. But, as the evening unfolds, news hits of a landslide at a coal mine. It has buried a school: Aberfan. William decides he must act, so he stands and volunteers to attend. It will be his first job as an embalmer, and it will be one he never forgets. His work that night will force him to think about the little boy he was and the losses he has worked so hard to forget. But compassion can have surprising consequences, because as William discovers, giving so much to others can sometimes help us heal ourselves.… (mais)
Nenhum(a)
A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Ver também 7 menções

Mostrando 3 de 3
Shortlisted for the Bridport Prize for emerging writers, A Terrible Kindness is the debut novel of Jo Browning Wroe from Birmingham. In the UK it became a bestseller, but I heard about it from a podcast called Pagecast. This novel was also mentioned in a Guardian article about the rise of older female writers. Wroe was 58 when it was published. Most people would probably not associate traumatic experiences with the e, and in my reading, it has featured in that context. A Terrible Kindness, however, is the first that I've read that focusses on the unseen 'first responders' who come into a community to attend to the bodies of the dead in a mass disaster. Wroe's novel is about a young man called William, who responded for a call to help at the Aberfan disaster. Aged just nineteen, he spent three days making a succession of little bodies fit for parents to identify, and when his work was done he went home to Birmingham. Aberfan in the days immediately after the disaster, showing the extent of the spoil slip (Wikipedia) Reading this novel brought back memories for me. I was a teenager in 1966 when a Welsh colliery slag heap collapsed in heavy rain, sending a slurry (a river of waste material from the coal mine) down into the valley at 50 miles an hour. In the village of Aberfan, it smothered Pantglas Junior School and some houses, killing 116 children between seven and ten, and 28 adults. It was front page news here in Australia, and though the disaster was masked by the small black-and-white images, the world grieved. Going to school was an ordinary everyday experience. It had never occurred to us that disaster could suddenly strike like this. How could a community recover from something so dreadful? It is normal, I expect, that people focus on the bereaved, but Wroe, who 'grew up in a crematorium in Birmingham' has crafted her novel to depict the experience of one who dealt with this experience without the support of the community. William arrives at the scene after driving all night and is ushered into a makeshift, get them identified, treat and coffin them. Then they're moved to the other chapel. ' Jimmy still has his hand on William's shoulder, but he's talking to a spot on the ground a few feet ahead of them. William tries to concentrate; there won't be time for questions later. 'Our biggest challenge is the slurry. It's like tar and all you've got is soap and cold water. Just do the best y, William — it is William, isn't it?' William nods again. 'The help we give these people is not complicated. We do our job. We do it well, we do it quickly and we leave. We're not priests, or friends or family. We're embalmers. Keep your head down and your heart hard. That's your kindness.' He squeezes William's shoulder. 'Got it?' 'Yes sir.' (p.17) To read the rest of my review please visit https://anzlitlovers.com/2023/02/27/a-ter
  anzlitlovers | Mar 4, 2023 |
In October 1966, the small town of Aberfan in Wales, suffered a terrible tragedy when, after days of rain, a pile of spoils from the local coal mines slid in a slurry down the hillside into the town, taking down everything in its way, including the local school. 116 children and 28 adults were buried under the piles.

It took days to recover the bodies and the importance at that time of the embalmers cannot be overstated. They worked tirelessly to embalm the bodies after the grueling task of presenting devastated parents with the evidence that their child was among the lost. Jo Browning Wroe chose this setting for her enormously compelling and tragic novel.

Recently graduated embalmer, William Lavery, is asked to go to Aberfan to help and he accepts the challenge. He comes from a family of embalmers and funeral directors but his real love, nurtured by his mother and the Cambridge Choir she managed to get him into, is music and especially the singing of Allegri's 'Miserere'.

"It's a high wire act, this solo, like floating above a canyon. Getting up there isn't the problem; William can get to an F, never mind a C. The problem is holding the G in perfect pitch, rock steady, without cracking or fading while all the parts below are changing. Allegri's 'Miserere'. It still thrills him how his breath, his voice, can fill the chapel, soaring up to its high ceiling, piercing the silence, or slicing through other voices. And when he's a soloist, there's the thrill of knowing the others' voices are there to frame and magnify his own. It's magic. Pure magic." (Page 124)

Those are the two different threads of William's life that are woven together brilliantly in the novel, the Aberfan tragedy and the story that is William's life, both filled with challenges and sadness but the author handles all with aplomb and beautiful prose. This is historical fiction at the height of its powers, able to convey to the reader the horror of one particular event and its eventual impact on one individual, who is also fighting other demons. Wonderfully done and plenty of opportunities for tears. I played Allegri's 'Miserere' in the background while I read and it's just as beautiful as described. I'll remember this book for a long time and what more can we hope for as readers. ( )
2 vote brenzi | Apr 10, 2022 |
"'I remember them,' the woman says, 'a terrible job. A terrible kindness they did for us. Something none of us wanted to think about.'"

A Terrible Kindness opens with William Lavery attending an event for embalmers. He's newly qualified and is joining the family business. It's clear embalming is a vocation for gentle William, one where he can show one final act of kindness and care to a person. However, very quickly he is put to the test when he volunteers to go to Aberfan and help with the embalming of those who died in the coal mine landslide. It's not often a book sets me off crying in the first few pages but that's what happened here as William has to deal with the unthinkable and tragic loss of a community's children.

Bookended by sections about Aberfan and its effect on William are sections on William's time at Cambridge as a chorister and his early life as an embalmer. There's so much relevant background to William's life and what's so skilful about the writing is the way Jo Browning-Wroe unfolds it layer by layer until the whole picture is clear.

This is an incredible book and one that I will never forget. This kind of book doesn't come along very often and when it does it's breathtaking. The writing is so beautifully evocative. Even a passage where William remembers the drawer at home that contained the napkins his mother has brought to school, and the items that nestled alongside them was so real it brought a lump to my throat. It's full of the little moments that make up a life, each important in its own way. Small acts of kindness mean so much but it's a long time until William can accept that not everything is cut and dried.

There are two pieces of music interwoven through the story with such meaning. The author made them special and brought them to life to such an extent that they will always bring this book to mind if I hear them. There's a melancholy to them that chimes perfectly with the themes of the book.

I don't think anything I could say would do justice to just how wonderful A Terrible Kindness is. It's an outstanding debut, one that I started and finished reading in tears. It's extraordinarily moving, a story of family, loss and friendship amidst the worst that life can throw at you. ( )
  nicx27 | Jan 12, 2022 |
Mostrando 3 de 3
sem críticas | adicionar uma crítica
Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Locais importantes
Acontecimentos importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Filmes relacionados
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Citações
Últimas palavras
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Língua original
DDC/MDS canónico
LCC Canónico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

It is October 1966 and William Lavery is having the night of his life at his first black-tie do. But, as the evening unfolds, news hits of a landslide at a coal mine. It has buried a school: Aberfan. William decides he must act, so he stands and volunteers to attend. It will be his first job as an embalmer, and it will be one he never forgets. His work that night will force him to think about the little boy he was and the losses he has worked so hard to forget. But compassion can have surprising consequences, because as William discovers, giving so much to others can sometimes help us heal ourselves.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Current Discussions

Nenhum(a)

Capas populares

Ligações Rápidas

Avaliação

Média: (4.3)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 3
3.5
4 11
4.5 4
5 9

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 201,855,171 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível