Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquisar O Sítio Web
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

A carregar...

Demon Copperhead

por Barbara Kingsolver

Outros autores: Ver a secção outros autores.

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaDiscussões / Menções
3,2051324,146 (4.35)1 / 274
The teenage son of an Appalachian single mother who dies when he is eleven uses his good looks, wit, and instincts to survive foster care, child labor, addiction, disastrous loves, and crushing losses.
A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

» Ver também 274 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 131 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
"Literature is a long conversation through time and space."
Barbara Kingsolver

Although this book is intellectually stimulating and well- written, its bleakness can be depressing.
In her introduction, Kingsolver speaks of the inspiration for this novel. She had finished a tour for her last book, and was grappling with subject for the next one. She knew that she wanted to write about opiod addiction. She knew that "any novel worth your time and mine should concern itself with the problems that keep us awake at night." She just did not know how to present it.
In the introduction to the Barnes and Nobles Exclusive Edition, Kingsolver recounts how the story of Demon Copperhead came about. She was staying at an inn that was once Bleak House, the seaside residence of Charles Dickens and was allowed to explore the house and even sit at the desk where Charles Dickens wrote David Copperfield. She writes that while looking out at the sea, she realized that this was also Dickens view while he wrote the novel that was "closest to his heart."
She then had an "ethereal visit" and felt "a ghost of outrage past, suggesting I was a coward if I couldn't risk telling the stories that matter most. Whether or not people want to hear about such things. It's the artist's job to make them want to hear." A voice told her : "Look to the child". Was this Dicken's permission to rewrite David Copperfield to tell a tale of misery about the Appalachian mountains, "a beautiful, rural place" in which she grew up, now a place where an entire generation of kids are growing up a product of families destroyed by prescription drug abuse.
With Dickens' apparent approval, she has it all here: every major character rewritten in this tale of childhood trauma and eventual resilience. If you are interesting in comparing the original to this version, I recommend this link as a place to start: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demon_Copperhead
Reading the original is not a prerequisite for this book.
Just beware. This is not feel good fiction. Along with an exploration of the opiod crisis in Appalachia, the characters discuss the economic tragedy brought about by the mining industry,the education system in the region, society's denegration of their lifestyle as "hillbilly" culture, and the social/historical aspects of melungeon people, the foster system, child labor and lastly, the role of art as a means for societal change.
Kingsolver, feels that Dickens would approve. In her acknowledgements she starts with the following paragraph:
"I'm grateful to Charles Dickens for writing David Copperfield, his impassioned critique of insitiutional poverty and its damaging effects on children in his society. Those problems are still with us. In adapting his novel to my own place and time, working for years with his outrage, inventiveness, and empathy at my elbow, I've come to thinkof him as my genius friend."
This book is a selection chosen for both book clubs I belong to. I am interested in finding out what the members' thoughts will be!
4 out of 5 stars not only for the utter bleakness of the book but for the ending! ( )
  Chrissylou62 | Apr 11, 2024 |
This is an excellent book. Interesting characters and a narrative that moves along nicely. I was impressed how Kingsolver wove in our current opioid crisis and how that started and affected regular folks with devastating consequences. I also appreciated how she used her narrative to comment on the power imbalance between employee and employer when corporate welfare is wrapped in the guise of free enterprise. ( )
  Neil_Luvs_Books | Apr 6, 2024 |
A great novel that takes the reader from Demon's birth to a life in Lee County in the Appalachian Mountains of Virginia. His life is packed with drugs, poverty, American football and drawing cartoons and various friends. He has some ups and many downs. It is all perfectly written and so engrossing. ( )
  CarolKub | Mar 26, 2024 |
One of the best-written books I've ever read. ( )
  Nodressrehearsal | Mar 22, 2024 |
A searing look at the life of a poverty-stricken, unwanted boy growing up amid the opioid crisis in the mountains of Virginia. Abusive step-father, criminal foster parents, drug addict friends are balanced by DC's will and perseverance. Kingsolver hammers home the message that DC is -- indeed all of his people -- are, at best, scapegoats and objects of scorn and, at worst, invisible. Despite the gravity of the subject, the book has moments of humor, poignancy, and even joy. This is the true hillbilly elegy. ( )
  mjspear | Mar 17, 2024 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 131 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Equal parts hilarious and heartbreaking, this is the story of an irrepressible boy nobody wants, but readers will love. Damon is the only child of a teenage alcoholic — “an expert at rehab” — in southwest Virginia.... In a feat of literary alchemy, Kingsolver uses the fire of that boy’s spirit to illuminate — and singe — the darkest recesses of our country....From the moment Demon starts talking to us, his story is already a boulder rolling down the Appalachian Mountains, faster and faster, stopping for nothing. ...Kingsolver has effectively reignited the moral indignation of the great Victorian novelist to dramatize the horrors of child poverty in the late 20th century.
 
In echoing Dickens, Barbara Kingsolver has written a social justice novel all her own, one only she could write, for our time and for the ages.Master storyteller Kingsolver has given the world a book that will have a ripple effect through the generations...Like all stories that stick with you, this one is both universal and decidedly personal. If you’ve lived near the Appalachians, you'll recognize these characters as well as their voice. They may even remind you of family members—those who’ve made it through, made it out, or made it back. If you haven’t, it will touch your heart anyway....That Kingsolver has shone a light on them as only she can, is a leap in understanding the hurting of a forgotten, often misunderstood and ridiculed people. Next time you see such a person, be kind, open your mind, and stop making fun of their accent.
 
“Demon Copperhead” reimagines Dickens’s story in a modern-day rural America contending with poverty and opioid addiction... Of course Barbara Kingsolver would retell Dickens. He has always been her ancestor. Like Dickens, she is unblushingly political and works on a sprawling scale, animating her pages with the presence of seemingly every creeping thing that has ever crept upon the earth.....Kingsolver’s prose is often splendid....And so, caught between polemic and fairy tale, Kingsolver is stuck with an anticlimax. .
 
With its bold reversals of fate and flamboyant cast, this is storytelling on a grand scale – Dickensian, you might say, and Kingsolver does indeed describe Demon Copperhead as a contemporary adaptation of David Copperfield....And what a story it is: acute, impassioned, heartbreakingly evocative, told by a narrator who’s a product of multiple failed systems, yes, but also of a deep rural landscape with its own sustaining traditions.
 

» Adicionar outros autores

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Barbara Kingsolverautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Carlson-Stanisic, LeahDesignerautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Thurston, CharlieNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

Foi inspirada por

Prémios

Distinctions

Notable Lists

Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Locais importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Acontecimentos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Epígrafe
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
“It’s in vain to recall the past, unless it works some influence upon the present.”

Charles Dickens, David Copperfield
Dedicatória
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
For the survivors.
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
First, I got myself born.
Citações
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Living in a holler, the sun gets around to you late in the day, and leaves you early. Like much else you might want. In my years since, I've been amazed to see how much more daylight gets flung around in the flatter places.
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
(Carregue para mostrar. Atenção: Pode conter revelações sobre o enredo.)
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Língua original
DDC/MDS canónico
LCC Canónico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

The teenage son of an Appalachian single mother who dies when he is eleven uses his good looks, wit, and instincts to survive foster care, child labor, addiction, disastrous loves, and crushing losses.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Current Discussions

"Demon Copperhead" by Barbara Kingsolver em 75 Books Challenge for 2023

Capas populares

Ligações Rápidas

Avaliação

Média: (4.35)
0.5 1
1 8
1.5 2
2 15
2.5 5
3 54
3.5 38
4 233
4.5 98
5 388

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 204,117,269 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível