Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquisar O Sítio Web
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

A carregar...

The Sun Walks Down

por Fiona McFarlane

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
1586172,822 (3.84)14
Fiction. Literature. Mythology. Historical Fiction. HTML:

Short-Listed for the 2023 Walter Scott Prize for Historical Fiction
"The Sun Walks Down is the book I'm always longing to find: brilliant, fresh, and compulsively readable. It is marvelous. I loved it start to finish." ??Ann Patchett, author of The Dutch House
Fiona McFarlane's blazingly brilliant new novel, The Sun Walks Down, tells the many-voiced, many-sided story of a boy lost in colonial Australia.
In September 1883, a small town in the South Australian outback huddles under strange, vivid sunsets. Six-year-old Denny Wallace has gone missing during a dust storm, and the entire community is caught up in the search for him. As they scour the desert and mountains for the lost child, the residents of Fairly??newlyweds, farmers, mothers, Indigenous trackers, cameleers, children, artists, schoolteachers, widows, maids, policemen??confront their relationships, both with one another and with the land­scape they inhabit.
The colonial Australia of The Sun Walks Down is noisy with opinions, arguments, longings, and terrors. It's haunted by many gods??the sun among them, rising and falling on each day in which Denny could be found, or lost forever.
Told in many ways and by many voices, Fiona McFarlane's new novel pulses with love, art, and the unbearable divine. It arrives like a vision, mythic and bright with
… (mais)

A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Ver também 14 menções

Mostrando 5 de 5
Every time I felt I was getting comfortable with the book some event threw me off my stride and made me question what was going on. There was no smooth transition. The writing was good but it left me glad to finish the book. Thank you Goodreads for a copy for my review. ( )
  juju2cat | Apr 9, 2024 |
In the late 19th century in outback Australia, a small boy is sent on an errand and gets lost in a dust storm. For the next week or so family, friends and townsfolk search for the little boy, Denny.

This was an interesting look at life at that time in that place, and the book was short-listed for the Walter Scott prize for Historical Fiction. Denny's older sister and his deaf mother play prominent roles, as does his father. However, his father has to balance his concern for Denny with the realities that taking time off from the never-ending grind of work to search for Denny may result in his inability to make mortgage payments on the farm. There are some interesting details about the interactions between the white settlers in the town and the local aborigines, including the wealthiest landowner in the area coveting the possum coat worn by one of the aboriginal searchers.

There's some good story-telling here, but I did not find the book to be a particularly compelling read.

3 stars ( )
  arubabookwoman | Dec 31, 2023 |
Despite its evocative prose, this book didn’t resonate with me.

The setting is the span of a week in September of 1883 in the outback of South Australia. A dust storm sweeps through the small town of Fairly and six-year-old Denny Wallace goes missing from his parents’ nearby farm. The reader gets to spend the week of the search with various people who live in Fairly and its environs.

The perspectives of so many people are given: Denny; Mary, Denny’s mother; Mathew, Denny’s father; Cissy, one of Denny’s five sisters; Robert, the town’s police constable; Minna, Robert’s wife; Wilhelmina, Minna’s mother; Sergeant Foster, who arrives to take charge of the official search; Joanna Axam, the widow of an English aristocrat who started a sheep ranch in the area; George and Ralph Axam, Joanna’s sons; Karl and Bess Rapp, Swedish artists traveling through the area; an Afghan cameleer; the town’s prostitute; Billy Rough, Mathew’s Indigenous farmhand; Mary’s father; Mary’s stepmother; and the local vicar. And this is not a complete list!

There is actually very little plot, though there is a lot of description of landscape. What are also included are the anxieties, hopes and dreams, beliefs, accomplishments, and failures of many of the characters. The problem for me was connecting with any of the characters because the sheer number of them makes that difficult. Furthermore, few of the characters are likeable. Everyone seems self-serving. There’s a woman, a newlywed, who is obsessed with sex, and not only with her husband; there’s a rich woman who has so much yet wants to steal a cloak from an Aboriginal tracker; and there’s a woman who adds to a family’s pain to fulfill her artistic ambitions. And so many of the white settlers are condescending to the Aboriginal Peoples.

What I found most interesting was the examination of the relationship between the colonizers and Australia’s Indigenous Peoples. It is obvious that the Whites have tried to shape the land to their needs, but are largely unsuccessful because of their limited understanding of that land. The Aboriginals are very much in tune with nature, but the Whites tend to be dismissive and condescending. Billy, for example, is careful never to antagonize by doing something that might suggest to a white person that he is more skilled. Sergeant Foster becomes upset when he learns that his native trackers have been given the same wine as he. Many of the employees on the Axam sheep farm are Aboriginal, but George thinks of them as unreliable: “He thinks of them as disposed to laziness (they are, for example, disinclined to engage in hard physical labour during the hottest part of a hot day).” George’s father Henry insisted on teaching Billy skills he felt he’d need in his life at Henry’s side and prevented Billy from speaking his native language and completing his initiation ceremonies and becoming a full elder in his tribe.

As I stated earlier, I can appreciate how well-written the book is, but the presence of so many characters and so many viewpoints means I found it difficult to connect with anyone. Except for Denny’s fate, I remained indifferent to what might happen to people. I would have enjoyed a book focusing on Billy Rough and his role in and perspective on the search for Denny; he seems to have a unique understanding of the sensitive young boy, having “noticed Denny’s watchful way of being in the world . . . the way he speaks to invisible things.”

This book will undoubtedly appeal to some readers, but it didn’t work for me.

Note: Please check out my reader's blog (https://schatjesshelves.blogspot.com/) and follow me on Twitter (https://twitter.com/DCYakabuski). ( )
  Schatje | Aug 24, 2023 |
The Wallace family lives in a small town in the Outback in the 1800's. One day, seven year old Denny disappears into the desert. Mary, the mother, and Matthew, the father begin a slow search first believing that he will appear but as time goes on fear sets in. The story is about the search for this young boy - the sisters in the family: Cissy, Joy, Ada, Novella; the young constable who has recently married Minna, the daughter of a more affluent family; Seargent Foster, the military man who is also an author; and Karl and Bess, a Swedish couple who is touring Australia painting and drawing.

The characters are real, the plot is believable, and everything seems accurate for the time and place. The dessert in the Outback with the red sunsets is beautifully drawn.

There is humor in the story, the mystery of finding Denny, and the yearnings of the characters. Loved the story. ( )
  maryreinert | Jul 28, 2023 |
“This is bloody country for those who aren’t prepared—the weak, the nervous. The true pioneers, true children of the bush, are always masters of themselves.”

After a dust storm passes over the tiny South Australian town of Fairly, six year old Denny Wallace, who was last seen collecting kindling in a dry creek bed behind the family homestead, cannot be found. While Denny’s mother and sisters fret, Denny’s father, Matthew, returns from a long day of sowing turnips in the field, to then set out in to the desert with his hired hand, Billy Rough, to search for his only son. When they fail to find him by first light, word spreads quickly across the region, and the community begins to rally.

Set in 1883, The Sun Walks Down unfolds over a week in September. As each long day passes, McFarlane dips in and out of the lives of those touched, some only peripherally, by Denny’s disappearance exposing anxieties and ambitions, rivalries and friendships, superstitions and secrets, accomplishments and failures. Meanwhile Denny, a sensitive child, wanders across the Flinders Ranges, lost and afraid of the blood red Sun.

Objectively I recognise and appreciate the elements of this story from the evocative imagery, to its thoughtful exploration of themes such as colonisation and dispossession. The characters are portrayed with an unexpected richness given the large cast, and their relationships to one another, and the land, acknowledges the distinctiveness of culture, experience and purpose.

Yet I was unmoved by it all, even the possibilities of poor Denny’s fate. I can’t articulate why I didn’t connect emotionally to the story, because nothing is lacking per se, it just didn’t resonate with me.

Despite my own experience, I do feel The Sun Walks Down has a lot to recommend it so if it appeals, don’t hesitate to pick it up. ( )
1 vote shelleyraec | Oct 30, 2022 |
Mostrando 5 de 5
sem críticas | adicionar uma crítica
Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Locais importantes
Acontecimentos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Citações
Últimas palavras
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Língua original
DDC/MDS canónico
LCC Canónico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

Fiction. Literature. Mythology. Historical Fiction. HTML:

Short-Listed for the 2023 Walter Scott Prize for Historical Fiction
"The Sun Walks Down is the book I'm always longing to find: brilliant, fresh, and compulsively readable. It is marvelous. I loved it start to finish." ??Ann Patchett, author of The Dutch House
Fiona McFarlane's blazingly brilliant new novel, The Sun Walks Down, tells the many-voiced, many-sided story of a boy lost in colonial Australia.
In September 1883, a small town in the South Australian outback huddles under strange, vivid sunsets. Six-year-old Denny Wallace has gone missing during a dust storm, and the entire community is caught up in the search for him. As they scour the desert and mountains for the lost child, the residents of Fairly??newlyweds, farmers, mothers, Indigenous trackers, cameleers, children, artists, schoolteachers, widows, maids, policemen??confront their relationships, both with one another and with the land­scape they inhabit.
The colonial Australia of The Sun Walks Down is noisy with opinions, arguments, longings, and terrors. It's haunted by many gods??the sun among them, rising and falling on each day in which Denny could be found, or lost forever.
Told in many ways and by many voices, Fiona McFarlane's new novel pulses with love, art, and the unbearable divine. It arrives like a vision, mythic and bright with

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Current Discussions

Nenhum(a)

Capas populares

Ligações Rápidas

Avaliação

Média: (3.84)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5 1
3 5
3.5 5
4 16
4.5 1
5 5

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 204,815,654 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível