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A Lucky Child: A Memoir of Surviving…
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A Lucky Child: A Memoir of Surviving Auschwitz as a Young Boy (original 2007; edição 2015)

por Thomas Buergenthal (Autor)

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6854225,995 (4.1)12
Thomas Buergenthal, now a Judge in the International Court of Justice in The Hague, tells his astonishing experiences as a young boy in his memoir. Arriving at Auschwitz at age 10 after surviving two ghettos and a labor camp, he became separated first from his mother and then his father but managed by his wits and some remarkable strokes of luck to survive on his own. Almost two years after his liberation, Buergenthal was miraculously reunited with his mother and in 1951 arrived in the U.S. to start a new life.… (mais)
Membro:KelleyHartnett
Título:A Lucky Child: A Memoir of Surviving Auschwitz as a Young Boy
Autores:Thomas Buergenthal (Autor)
Informação:Little, Brown Spark (2015), Edition: Expanded, 304 pages
Colecções:Para ler
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

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A Lucky Child: A Memoir of Surviving Auschwitz as a Young Boy por Thomas Buergenthal (2007)

  1. 20
    The Diary of a Young Girl por Anne Frank (Utilizador anónimo)
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For being about the horrors of Nazi occupation of Europe and the Holocaust, this wasn't a difficult read. The author, Thomas Buergenthal, writes about his childhood in an approachable manner. It probably helps that he's writing it several decades after the fact - the pain and anger he would have felt during and immediately after the events have had time to heal. It's light on details of the day-to-day activities of those years, as he and his family were first on the run from Germans, then living in the Jewish ghetto in Poland, then the various concentration camps he was imprisoned in. As a result, it glosses over a lot of the horrors, focusing instead on events that stick out to him most - but those events are rather harrowing in themselves. He doesn't linger on them though. Some might find this lack of detail frustrating, others may be relieved. I've read other accounts of the Holocaust, most memorably Elie Wiesel's [b:Night|1617|Night (The Night Trilogy, #1)|Elie Wiesel|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1473495285s/1617.jpg|265616], so I was able to fill in what wasn't there.

This felt like a very honest and intimate account of his days surviving WWII and the Holocaust. His writing here is flowing and stark, and he doesn't get bogged down with unnecessary repetition like last few autobiographies I've read. He was indeed a "lucky" child to survive Dr. Mengele and Auschwitz. Speaking of Night, they were both clearly in Auschwitz at the same time, as they both describe the Death March with the same sort of dreadful resignation. He was lucky many other times in order to survive, and that continues even after his liberation as he details how he was eventually reunited with his mother.

One cannot stress enough how important this time period was to the shaping of the world as it is today and why it's necessary that it continue to be taught in our schools. Buergenthal's work in international humanitarian law is inspirational and reminds us that, no matter how bleak things can still appear, there is hope for improvement and that things already have improved in many places. We can make the world a better place, but we can only do that by remembering the atrocities that came before and striving not to repeat them. ( )
  Linda_Bookworm | May 6, 2021 |
Nothing Dr. Buergenthal could write can make me understand the unbelievable horror he lived through. Clearly, he belongs to that band of children given to be resilient in the face of overwhelming odds.

I was fortunate to hear the professor speak at the installation of Ralph Steinhardt as the new holder of the Loebinger Chair (and recipient of an actual GWLS chair, which Buergenthal humorously pointed out had never been given to him....). His love of living was so apparent in his remarks, I felt compelled to read his memoir. ( )
  kaulsu | Jan 20, 2018 |
This man's story is amazing. If it was a movie you would shake your head and say the director went too far. Nobody could be that lucky. ( )
  Fearshop | Aug 10, 2017 |
In this memoir of his life as a young prisoner, Buergenthal adds depth and a thoughtful voice to other stories of the Holocaust you may have read. Buergenthal doesn't diminish the horrors of life in the ghetto or the series of work and concentration camps. Instead, he focuses on the connections, accidental fortunes, and human choices. At several points in the book, Buergenthal offered the reader questions about choices (e.g., why do some people abandon principals or turn on their fellow prisoners?) and perceptions (were the post-war Polish looters different than the Germans?). It is a must read with any other book on the subject.

Pros: Thoughtful and thought provoking, A Lucky Child offers readers a personal story with a universal study of humanity's best (and ugliest) moments.

There's more to our review. Visit The Reading Tub®. While you’re there, add a link to your review of the book.
  TheReadingTub | Mar 14, 2016 |
En fantastisk livshistoria från gettot i Kielce, koncentrationslägren i Auschwitz och Sachsenhausen, polska armén som pojksoldat, barnhem i Otwock (Polen) till friheten och återföreningen med modern i Göttingen och slutligen emigration till USA, där han blir professor i internationell rätt med mänskliga rättigheter som specialitet. Boken har översatts av hans domarkollega Krister Thelin vid Internationella domstolen i Haag. Att boken är skriven ett halvt sekel efter de fruktansvärda upplevelser som skildras, gör att texten förmedlar en viss distans och överblick. ( )
  Humila | Jan 21, 2016 |
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Et lykkebarn
Gutten som overlevde Holocaust og ble dommer i Haag"Thomas Buergenthals liv fra han var syv til elleve år gammel kunne ikke vært mer dramatisk. [...] en svært tilgjengelig bok."
– Sten Inge Jørgensen, VG, terningkast 5

10 år gammel hadde Thomas Buergenthal overlevd to polske ghettoer, Auschwitz og dødsmarsjen til Sachsenhausen. Odd Nansen berget livet hans i krigens siste dager.

Dette er erindringer fra en barndom som brått ble forvandlet fra idyll til ghettoer og konsentrasjonsleire. Men det er også den gripende historien om gjenforeningen med moren og letingen etter redningsmannen Odd Nansen etter krigen. Vesle «Tommy» ble kjent for tusenvis av norske lesere gjennom Nansens bestselgende dagbok, og det ble et folkekrav i Norge å få vite hvordan det hadde gått med gutten.

Erfaringene fra nazistenes folkemord og vennskapet med Odd Nansen ledet Thomas Buergenthal dit han er idag – til stillingen som dommer i Den internasjonale domstolen i Haag.

Presse"Oppmuntrende selvbiografi fra et barn som overlevde Holocaust. [...] Den mest verdifulle dimensjonen i Buergenthals fremstilling er insisteringen på ærlighet og optimisme selv i en slik grufull kontekst. [...] Avslutningsvis leverer han krystallklare argumenter for at verden tross alt kan bevege seg fremover."
– Sten Inge Jørgensen, VG, terningkast 5

"I´ve never read a holocaust memoir like this. The description of horrors is unflinching, yet full of wry insights into human character and underlying everything is an extraordinary generosity of spirit. But it is also the insights that Buergenthal brings from his work as a distinguished human rights lawyer that make the book quite remarkable. I´ve seldom been so fired up about a book – as we all are."
– Andrew Franklin, Profile Books
adicionada por kirstenlund | editarwww.spartacus.no (Sep 25, 2009)
 

» Adicionar outros autores (20 possíveis)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Buergenthal, Thomasautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Wiesel, EliePrefácioautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Moppes, Rob vanTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Röckel, SusanneÜbersetzerautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Thelin, KristerTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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To the memory of my parents, Mundek and Gerda Buergenthal, whose love, strength of character; and integrity inspired this book.
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Thomas Buergenthal, now a Judge in the International Court of Justice in The Hague, tells his astonishing experiences as a young boy in his memoir. Arriving at Auschwitz at age 10 after surviving two ghettos and a labor camp, he became separated first from his mother and then his father but managed by his wits and some remarkable strokes of luck to survive on his own. Almost two years after his liberation, Buergenthal was miraculously reunited with his mother and in 1951 arrived in the U.S. to start a new life.

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Edições: 0316043400, 0316043397

 

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