Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquisar O Sítio Web
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

A carregar...

Beyond the Pleasure Principle (1920)

por Sigmund Freud

Outros autores: Ver a secção outros autores.

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
724723,054 (3.68)1
Beyond the Pleasure Principleis Freud's most philosophical and speculative work, exploring profound questions of life and death, pleasure and pain. In it Freud introduces the fundamental concepts of the "repetition compulsion" and the "death drive," according to which a perverse, repetitive, self-destructive impulse opposes and even trumps the creative drive, or Eros. The work is one of Freud's most intensely debated, and raises important questions that have been discussed by philosophers and psychoanalysts since its first publication in 1920. The text is presented here in a contemporary new translation by Gregory C. Richter. Appendices trace the work's antecedents and the many responses to it, including texts by Plato, Friedrich Nietzsche, Melanie Klein, Herbert Marcuse, Jacques Derrida, and Judith Butler, among many others.… (mais)
A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Ver também 1 menção

Mostrando 1-5 de 7 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Behold one of Freud’s most over-determined navels. A piece of thought, exploration and theory that is yet to be pinned down and is a fertile seed to many theorists who came after and attempted to corral this confused yet beguiling psychical mechanism into their own works. A fount of seemingly never-ending creative inspiration for others.

While also being a frustrating 78 page read…

Been trying to come up with a review for this one for weeks and kept hitting some wall that I would be hard pressed not to attribute to some function of the pleasure principle / reality principle / death drive / jouissance.

Overtime / bonus chapter enjoyment through experience.

I know, I am rambling…
But this work doesn’t need to be summarized here.
My only desire is to express its effect on me…
As if one could say, “My *only* desire”…

It seems that every time I read Freud my brain is forced to read him on 4 or more parallel tracks that range over “what he’s trying to say” and “how he sometimes gets bogged down in trying to explain everything physiologically” yet “how even when that feels wrong there’s always still something interesting there so you have to parse it in real time” to “considering everything within the psychological and cultural context within which he was writing” yet still “separating that from the universal truths that he would still be living” while all the while being reminded of “what an amazing and brilliant explorer of a completely new realm” he was.

I’m reminded of Jacques Cousteau only if Jacques Cousteau had also basically DISCOVERED OCEANS before anyone else had thought to notice them.

Here’s the thing for me. Reading Freud is clearly frustrating because he was obviously on to something extraordinary and yet since he was the first one there he had to figure out from scratch how to even conceptualize, label and order it. I agree with others I’ve read that posit word choice might have been his biggest enemy. Pleasure principle. Reality principle. Death drive. Not only might these have been named better, but Freud himself often seemed mercurial in how he used his terms and would shift their meanings over time. I’m perfectly fine with Freud modifying and revising his concepts and theory over the years. But when that seems to happen within the limited pages of a short work it can be a bit difficult to lock on to a clear intended meaning.

Maybe that’s why his writings - and this work in particular - seem so ripe for interpretation and exploration...

I read BtPP right before reading Alenka Zupancic’s What IS Sex? (https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/36304803-what-is-sex) and I have to say it was a damn good match. Or maybe much of Lacanian studies revolve around this singular process/mechanism so that's not so surprising? I've now just started reading Seminar VII, and it’s with some feeling that the extension of this core theory will be expanded further.

Even with all the frustration and confusion it’s hard not to walk away from this book knowing in your gut that Freud was on to something. The words shift, the causes are many and over-determined, and yet the psychical actions that he describes feel too true and familiar to deny. Desire for homeostasis, judging future actions against some knowledge of possible pleasure or pain (comfort or discomfort), compulsive repetition (often of “seemingly” un-pleasureable acts), a basic obsession with and avoidance of the impossibility of existing, of being conscious yet cut off by a loss/gap back in a past you can’t remember yet always feel on the back of your shoulder. A desire to be inanimate if only to stop the desire machine…

This is the tool box for much that would follow... ( )
  23Goatboy23 | Jan 17, 2020 |
Beyond the Pleasure Principle is an extraordinary book, arguably one of the most important books ever written. Rather ashamed to admit this but I’ve never actually read Freud; given the amount of critiques, good and bad, that I’ve heard and read over the years, I decided it was time to read his work for myself. This book is really a short read that explores the “why” of our mind’s mechanics and his theory that we humans are guided by two instincts; the life instinct, Eros, which preserves all things, and the death instinct, served by the “pleasure principle” which seeks to return us to an inanimate state. This notion of the death instinct leads us to a most revolutionary theory-"The aim of all life is death". According to Feud, there is barely an aspect of life which is not exposed to the possibility of being harmed by its destructible force. Much of what Freud writes he himself admits is speculative yet the idea that there is a life and a death instinct in all organisms is certainly something that can be discussed on a deeper psychological level.

Beyond the Pleasure Principle, while short, is not an easy read, Freud sometimes packs too much information into each sentence. I frequently found myself wishing he would slow down and explain his theories in more detail, especially for those of us who have not studied psychology in any form. Being that this was one of his last texts, some of his earlier concepts seemed to be glossed over, making it difficult to understand, I would have benefited from a more detailed explanation in these areas. But, Freud is a fascinating writer, and it's interesting to read what he actually said compared to what I’ve heard about his theories.

**I received a complimentary advanced copy of this book from the publisher, Dover Publications and NetGalley in exchange for my honest review**
( )
1 vote jenladuca | May 22, 2015 |
In this work Freud presents his theory for a pyschological force that acts as the counterbalance of the sexual instinct, or libido, with which much of his previous work is concerned. Previously, he groups all forms of mpulse (such as self preservation and creativity) as being derived from the sexual instinct, which together with the other instincts such as feeding ourselves he categorises as the "Pleasure Principle". Whether we agree with this is not ever so important, it is partially a matter of semantics and redefining what is meant by libido and the sexual (Jung uses the term "libido" to refer to energy of the psyche in general).
The important development that is introduced here is Freud's introduction of a counter force, a "death instinct" or "death drive", that acts against the life forces of the libido. He asserts that its primary and most common manifestation is a compulsion to repeat, which is as much a product of the instincts and the unconscious as the libidinal impulses.
Freud presents various theoretical justifications for the death instinct, several from a biological /physical perspective: life originated from inanimate matter, and all life will die (and therefore this is its goal, thermodynamically speaking). The problem that I find in this is that from the point of view of a physicist, this is true, and there is no need to invoke a psychological principle to explain something that thermodynamics can explain, and from the point of view of a biologist, the idea of a universal death drive is not something that would have been selected for by natural selection. This, however, is not say that the death drive does not exist, only that some of Freud's justifications for his theory are ill-chosen. The clinical evidence, relating to masochism, and the link to repetition compulsion, however, does carry more weight.
Freud, throughout, acknowledges that this theory is speculative, in accord with his lack of evidence. As is said, the more remarkable a theory, the more remarkable the evidence that is needed to support it. Here there is no remarkable evidence, which is partly why this remains Freud's most controversial work. If one is interested in the thought of Freud, and psychology, then this is worth reading, however it raises more questions than it answers, and does not help the understanding of psychology like his other works. If, however, the reader wants to be given a difficult problem to think about, then this book is ideal. A previous knowledge of Freud's works, for example the material in his first volume of Introductory Lectures, would be more or less essential before reading this. ( )
1 vote P_S_Patrick | Jun 2, 2013 |
What a strange book! Not what I was expecting at all... Freud is not at his best, I think, when dabbling in pseudo-biology. Ultimately, the idea of a death instinct is more compelling than the argument as it appears here. ( )
  amydross | Nov 18, 2012 |
I bought this because I was interested in learning about Freud's theory of the "Death Drive," humans' paradoxical longing for self-destruction. Though he has fallen from grace in the eyes of the contemporary psychological community, I think Freud was genuinely one of the world's true geniuses, and his ideas deserve a second look. He had some truly profound insights into human nature, but I think he and his followers took them too literally. Viewed as metaphors, there's some profound truth in classic psychoanalytic theory.
  yonderboy777 | Dec 13, 2009 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 7 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
sem críticas | adicionar uma crítica

» Adicionar outros autores (12 possíveis)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Freud, Sigmundautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Jones, ErnestEditorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Reddick, JohnTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Strachey, JamesEditorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Strachey, JamesTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Zilboorg, GregoryIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Locais importantes
Acontecimentos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Prémios e menções honrosas
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Citações
Últimas palavras
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Língua original
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em italiano. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
DDC/MDS canónico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

Beyond the Pleasure Principleis Freud's most philosophical and speculative work, exploring profound questions of life and death, pleasure and pain. In it Freud introduces the fundamental concepts of the "repetition compulsion" and the "death drive," according to which a perverse, repetitive, self-destructive impulse opposes and even trumps the creative drive, or Eros. The work is one of Freud's most intensely debated, and raises important questions that have been discussed by philosophers and psychoanalysts since its first publication in 1920. The text is presented here in a contemporary new translation by Gregory C. Richter. Appendices trace the work's antecedents and the many responses to it, including texts by Plato, Friedrich Nietzsche, Melanie Klein, Herbert Marcuse, Jacques Derrida, and Judith Butler, among many others.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Ligações Rápidas

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (3.68)
0.5
1 3
1.5 1
2 3
2.5 1
3 13
3.5 8
4 15
4.5 1
5 16

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 158,011,541 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível