Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquisar O Sítio Web
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

A carregar...

The Bookbinder of Jericho

por Pip Williams

Séries: OUP Stories (2)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
5113047,742 (4.06)27
"It is 1914, and as the war draws the young men of Britain away to fight, women must keep the nation running. Two of those women are Peggy and Maude, twin sisters who live on a narrowboat in Oxford and work in the bindery at the university press. Ambitious, intelligent Peggy has been told for most of her life that her job is to bind the books, not read them-but as she folds and gathers pages, her mind wanders to the opposite side of Walton Street, where the female students of Oxford's Somerville College have a whole library at their fingertips. Maude, meanwhile, wants nothing more than what she has: to spend her days folding the pages of books in the company of the other bindery girls. She is extraordinary but vulnerable, and Peggy feels compelled to watch over her. Then refugees arrive from the war-torn cities of Belgium, sending ripples through the Oxford community and the sisters' lives. Peggy begins to see the possibility of another future where she can educate herself and use her intellect, not just her hands. But as war and illness reshape her world, her love for a Belgian soldier-and the responsibility that comes with it-threaten to hold her back."--… (mais)
A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Ver também 27 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 27 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
This is another well-researched feminist historical fiction by English Australian author Pip Williams. It is a sequel to, or a companion volume to The Dictionary of Lost Words, set in Oxford during WW1.

Peggy and her twin sister Maude work as bindery girls at the Oxford University Press and live aboard a ramshackle canal boat Calliope, as full of books as a floating library. Peggy loves reading and dreams of attending University, although this seems an impossibility for a girl, particularly one brought up very much as “town” rather than “gown.” Maude is never given a diagnosis in the book, but possibly has some form of autism. She loves origami and struggles to express herself other than repeating fragments she has heard. The war brings many changes and new people into their lives including the very damaged Belgian refugee Lotte, the wounded Bastiaan and the high society Gwen. There are also letters from the front, including from their feisty, suffragette godmother-figure Tilda.

The book gives insight into the Belgian crisis during WWI, when over 200,000 Belgians sought refuge in Britain, the influenza pandemic, and the ins and outs of how to bind a book (probably far too much detail on the latter).

I loved the descriptions of the relationship between Maude and Peggy, and its changing dynamic. This book told a good story, although it was very slow moving in parts and tending to get bogged down in minutiae. It was good, but not as stunning as the reviews make out, and not as impacting as The Dictionary of Lost Words. ( )
  mimbza | Apr 10, 2024 |
Thanks so much to Netgalley for the review copy. I’m glad I gave this author another chance. I plan to go back and finish The Dictionary of Lost Words. I look forward to reading more books by this author. ( )
  DKnight0918 | Dec 23, 2023 |
I fell in love with this book, and I didn't want to be over it. Luckily I had "The dictionary of lost words" right after. I traveled in Jericho, and it was such a beautiful trip. ( )
  simonamitac | Nov 27, 2023 |
Pip Williams writes softly, so softly that she allows you time to embrace her characters, their surroundings and the opportunity to know them intimately. Her writing requires attention and concentration because she builds upon her story and its occupants every so slowly. There is much to be told but Williams prefers to drop crumbs and allow the reader to come to her/his own conclusion at the appropriate time with just a few words.

Twins, identical but completely different. One “filters conversation like a prism filters light. She broke it down so that each phrase could be understood as an articulation of something singular. The truth of what she said could be inconvenient; sometimes it made life easier to understand her.” The other aware of their differences feeling the need to protect and preserve. Bindery girls folding pages, one not caring about the content, the other inhaling every word, nuance and thought - they couldn’t be more different although they were identical.

“Keep en eye.”
“Watch over.”
“Deep breath.”

On the cusp of World War I the sisters live a basic life, because this is a basic story of a very basic fight, for among other things, the vote for women, a margin of equality for women, and the work that women have done to wage those good fights. The research is immaculate, for one who has no knowledge Williams introduces the reader to Somerville College, The Clarendon Press, The Oxford University Press always reminding that women had to fight for a place in education, had to fight to break the protocols of class. The story ranges from everyday work at the bindery, to the heartbreaking consequences of war and the Spanish Flu, to the friendships and love that take up residence in the lives of the twins, Maude and Peggy, as the days and years pass.

Intrigued by the introduction of “The Anatomy of Melancholy”, it made several appearances and other than addressing a vast myriad of subjects, its inclusion informs and allows the story to embrace the melancholy that Burton wrote about and that Peggy is feeling . It opens the story to the vast ignorance, even by a librarian, of how a book is bound and the segregated sections of the bindery and segues into “a love of learning and overmuch study”. This is an apt description of Peggy and her desire to gain access that is withheld, to matriculate, to be a scholar, to find validation, to be acknowledged.

I enjoyed this book and the attention Pip Williams attributed to her twins, their point in time and circumstances. Her writing is profound in its simplicity with a fine tuned ear to description and dialog. Many, many thanks to Ballantine Books and NetGalley for a copy. ( )
  kimkimkim | Nov 25, 2023 |
Wonderful writing - clear, spare text with not one unnecessary word.
Excellent historical fiction telling of the life and roles of those of different genders and classes, against the backdrop of world war 1.
The sister of the protagonist has some form of autism, but is never classified. We gradually become aware of her differences, and abilities, but never explicitly - shown, not told.
I was captivated. ( )
  mbmackay | Nov 19, 2023 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 27 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
sem críticas | adicionar uma crítica

Pertence a Série

Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Locais importantes
Acontecimentos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Citações
Últimas palavras
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Língua original
DDC/MDS canónico
LCC Canónico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

"It is 1914, and as the war draws the young men of Britain away to fight, women must keep the nation running. Two of those women are Peggy and Maude, twin sisters who live on a narrowboat in Oxford and work in the bindery at the university press. Ambitious, intelligent Peggy has been told for most of her life that her job is to bind the books, not read them-but as she folds and gathers pages, her mind wanders to the opposite side of Walton Street, where the female students of Oxford's Somerville College have a whole library at their fingertips. Maude, meanwhile, wants nothing more than what she has: to spend her days folding the pages of books in the company of the other bindery girls. She is extraordinary but vulnerable, and Peggy feels compelled to watch over her. Then refugees arrive from the war-torn cities of Belgium, sending ripples through the Oxford community and the sisters' lives. Peggy begins to see the possibility of another future where she can educate herself and use her intellect, not just her hands. But as war and illness reshape her world, her love for a Belgian soldier-and the responsibility that comes with it-threaten to hold her back."--

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Current Discussions

Nenhum(a)

Capas populares

Ligações Rápidas

Avaliação

Média: (4.06)
0.5
1 2
1.5
2 1
2.5
3 13
3.5 10
4 42
4.5 10
5 27

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 204,758,662 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível