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In ascension por Martin MacInnes
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In ascension (original 2023; edição 2023)

por Martin MacInnes

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
283995,267 (3.82)28
LONGLISTED FOR THE 2023 BOOKER PRIZEAn astonishing novel about a young microbiologist investigating an unfathomable deep vent in the ocean floor, leading her on a journey that will encompass the full trajectory of the cosmos and the passage of a single human life Leigh grew up in Rotterdam, drawn to the waterfront as an escape from her unhappy home life and volatile father. Enchanted by the undersea world of her childhood, she excels in marine biology, travelling the globe to study ancient organisms. When a trench is discovered in the Atlantic ocean, Leigh joins the exploration team, hoping to find evidence of the earth's first life forms - what she instead finds calls into question everything we know about our own beginnings. Her discovery leads Leigh to the Mojave desert and an ambitious new space agency. Drawn deeper into the agency's work, she learns that the Atlantic trench is only one of several related phenomena from across the world, each piece linking up to suggest a pattern beyond human understanding. Leigh knows that to continue working with the agency will mean leaving behind her declining mother and her younger sister, and faces an impossible choice: to remain with her family, or to embark on a journey across the breadth of the cosmos. Exploring the natural world with the wonder and reverence we usually reserve for the stars, In Ascension is a compassionate, deeply inquisitive epic that reaches outward to confront the greatest questions of existence, looks inward to illuminate the smallest details of the human heart, and shows how - no matter how far away we might be and how much we have lost hope - we will always attempt to return to the people and places we call home.… (mais)
Membro:mmparker
Título:In ascension
Autores:Martin MacInnes
Informação:London : Atlantic Books, 2023.
Coleções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:to-read

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In Ascension por Martin MacInnes (2023)

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Mostrando 1-5 de 9 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
DNF

Recommended to me by a guy I went on a date with.
It was so slow, and monotone and dull. I kept zoning out. Putting it down helped me ascend out of the boredom.
  spiritedstardust | Jun 1, 2024 |
First the good: the novel is well-written, well-crafted, well-constructed – even if it’s sometimes transparent & obvious. Pacing is excellent, and the progression feels great: it starts as a regular book about an abusive dad, and slowly morphs into a mystery in the cold depths of space. I can see non-SF readers being sucked in, surprised by what they ultimately end up reading.

At the same time, even though it is set in the near future, In Ascension keeps it real – and MacInnes’ realism is what makes the later space scenes so harrowing and claustrophobic. Those might be the most true space ship scenes I have ever read – and that’s including Aurora from Robinson or Redemption Ark by Reynolds – who both in their own & very different ways tried to convey possible realities of fictional space flight.

But realism is not the full denominator: the alien stuff is handled differently, and remains vague & unresolved. There’s a bit of how Christopher Priest might handle such stuff there, and, as said, Stanisław Lem. MacInnes writes something that is both creepy and mystical, yet he doesn’t make it feel less real even if it is all handwavium. It also doesn’t dominate the story at all, and like the other speculative near future elements, generally remains in the background. Very well done, and rather unique.

Also the character arcs are well-done, and MacInnes lets our perception of the main character end up in some kind of liminal space. In a way there is no resolution or conclusion, or at least no definitive answer to the exact psychology of Leigh, and somehow it fits the story and its themes.

Serious novels get serious reviews, and googling will get you some quality writing on the book easily. As such, it’s nice to review this a few months after the fact, and engage in a dialogue not only with the book itself.

A few reviewers, like Duncan Lunan of Shoreline To Infinity and Stuart Kelly on The Scotsman, refer to an author’s note accompanying the review copies of the book – nowhere to be found in the edition I bought.

(...)

Full review on Weighing A Pig Doesn't Fatten It ( )
  bormgans | May 19, 2024 |
This is a good book. The story, mostly told in the first person, seemed at first to be mostly plot-driven the way sci-fi often is. Even though Leigh does describe growing up in her, close, caring, but not at all warm sort of family in Rotterdam, she speaks more about her early interest in biology and her path toward a pHd, and eventually a job heading a lab that is an important part of a new space project.

But I gradually became aware that, in this complex novel, each step on her way was related both to her traumatic childhood, to her parents and sister, and to her adventures to come. The book is about people and emotions as well as scientific and engineering details There are also questions about how life on Earth, including we humans, came to be the way we are now and, what might happen in the future.

Only when she finds herself one of a crew of three on a spacecraft moving rapidly through the solar system, toward interstellar space, did I think the pace slowed and wander into maybe too much detail. But that doesn’t last for long, and in the rest of the book Macinnes skillfully describes what could be only day-to-day routine in ways that kept me entranced to the end. ( )
  mykl-s | Apr 28, 2024 |
an interesting and well written novel that to me does not really work, because it is caught between its imaginative near-future set-up about a space flight and bioengineering immortality and the very different inward-looking focus of a contemporary family psychological novel. so it moves awkwardly between the momentum of an sf story and the more static inner issues of a psychological novel, and that complicates and ultimately compromises both impulses. at the same time both the author's attention to detail and the rhythms of his prose herald a gifted writer, but i'm not certain that this approach could ever work; perhaps he tried it as an experiment. ( )
  macha | Apr 3, 2024 |
I love this book.

As an extremely picky reader with a lot of jaded feelings towards fiction, I seldom find works with characters and concepts that speak to me but I genuinely felt changed after reading In Ascension. I found MacInnes's writing to be exceptional and never tone deaf, corny, or obnoxious. I wholeheartedly cared for the characters in this book and was fully committed to understanding whatever it was that I could about the main character, Leigh, and their family. I was gutted by the book's resolution and having to part ways.

Despite being branded as science fiction, I would argue that this book is so much more. It is an incredibly slow burn with major emphasis on the main character's internal relationship with themself as well as their external relationships with family and the people they meet along the way.
My biggest gripe about this book was simply that I am not someone with a very science-y brain, nor do I care much about topics in science, especially biology. With much of this book being filled with conversation about science related topics, it was easy to find myself zoning out or bored. I do not feel like this is necessarily a flaw, but I do think it is something that will deter certain readers. This is not an action packed book filled with super entertaining adventures or crazy events that will keep you on your toes, but it is an incredibly thought provoking and moving piece of writing that I would genuinely encourage the right reader to consume.

I'll be thinking about this one for a very long time.
( )
  brookeklebe | Feb 6, 2024 |
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Martin MacInnesautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Freya MillerNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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LONGLISTED FOR THE 2023 BOOKER PRIZEAn astonishing novel about a young microbiologist investigating an unfathomable deep vent in the ocean floor, leading her on a journey that will encompass the full trajectory of the cosmos and the passage of a single human life Leigh grew up in Rotterdam, drawn to the waterfront as an escape from her unhappy home life and volatile father. Enchanted by the undersea world of her childhood, she excels in marine biology, travelling the globe to study ancient organisms. When a trench is discovered in the Atlantic ocean, Leigh joins the exploration team, hoping to find evidence of the earth's first life forms - what she instead finds calls into question everything we know about our own beginnings. Her discovery leads Leigh to the Mojave desert and an ambitious new space agency. Drawn deeper into the agency's work, she learns that the Atlantic trench is only one of several related phenomena from across the world, each piece linking up to suggest a pattern beyond human understanding. Leigh knows that to continue working with the agency will mean leaving behind her declining mother and her younger sister, and faces an impossible choice: to remain with her family, or to embark on a journey across the breadth of the cosmos. Exploring the natural world with the wonder and reverence we usually reserve for the stars, In Ascension is a compassionate, deeply inquisitive epic that reaches outward to confront the greatest questions of existence, looks inward to illuminate the smallest details of the human heart, and shows how - no matter how far away we might be and how much we have lost hope - we will always attempt to return to the people and places we call home.

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