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Barnaby Rudge (in slip cover) por Charles…
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Barnaby Rudge (in slip cover) (original 1841; edição 1941)

por Charles Dickens

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
2,143315,434 (3.73)139
'What dark history is this?'This is the question that hangs over Dickens's brooding novel of mayhem and murder in the eighteenth century. Set in London at the time of the anti-Catholic Gordon Riots, Barnaby Rudge tells a story of individuals caught up in the mindless violence of the mob. Lord George Gordon's dangerous appealto old religious prejudices is interwoven with the murder mystery surrounding the father of the simple-minded Barnaby. The discovery of the murderer and his involvement in the riots put Barnaby's life in jeopardy. Culminating in the terrifying destruction of Newgate prison by the rampaging hordes,the descriptions of the riots are among Dickens's most powerful.Written at a time of social unrest in Victorian Britain, Barnaby Rudge explores the relationship between repression and liberation in private and public life. It looks forward to the dark complexities of Dickens's later novels, whose characters also seek refuge from a chaotic and unstable world.… (mais)
Membro:slowloris
Título:Barnaby Rudge (in slip cover)
Autores:Charles Dickens
Informação:Heritage Press edition
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:British Literature

Pormenores da obra

Barnaby Rudge por Charles Dickens (1841)

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Mostrando 1-5 de 31 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
I must admit, I really enjoyed Barnaby Rudge. Dickens' 6th book, and 5th novel, it is perhaps the least read of his "Big Fifteen" and not unfairly, but that's only because the rest of them are so vibrant! Barnaby Rudge is a bit of an anomaly, in that it has its origins in history, but it's still very Dickensian, and fits neatly into its place just after The Old Curiosity Shop, which also features a naive young thing running away with their guardian from an unforgiving society. Published in 1841, Rudge is the last book in a rapid writing frenzy that must have overtaken Dickens. It's certainly true that these early novels feel less thorough, less thematically unified than the later works (but perhaps that's because Dickens was thinking almost solely of serialisation, and not so much about ultimate publication), but it also means that they can be more surprising. One doesn't feel so often (as one does even with the best of the later books) that Dickens is making you wait forever just to get to the secrets he has kept hidden from you.

Despite being the title character (and one of my personal favourites), Barnaby himself is not really the lead in this book; it feels like a real ensemble piece, being marvelously unpredictable in terms of which characters will join which side of the riots. The riot setpieces themselves, and how easily Barnaby is swept up in them (perhaps reflecting on how so many others were swept up, in some cases unwillingly and in some cases just due to the Trump-esque mob mentality), are particularly moving. What works here is Dickens' incredible skill at description; every home and street feels truly lived in, even if none of the characters in this novel - even the irrepressible Dolly Varden - have any real internal life. To be honest, I feel as if the first half of the novel is a bit repetitive, while the second half spends so much historical time on the one situation that the book could easily be a two- or three-hour miniseries rather than the kind of lengthy soap opera which could be spun from Little Dorrit. Anyhow, if only the BBC would give us a modern Barnaby Rudge, perhaps the book would be more widely read! In truth, I'd place this fairly low down the Dickens totem pole, lower than Dombey and Son, perhaps equal to The Old Curiosity Shop, but I find it interesting to see Dickens applying his skill to history, which gives him a chance to further investigate why men do what they do, a question he will plunge into with great fervour later in his career. By the time Rudge was done, Dickens was off to America, and the next phase of his remarkable career. ( )
  therebelprince | Nov 15, 2020 |
There are some really evil characters in this book. It is a historical novel, based on anti-catholic riots in London during the 1790's. With a Dickensian twist.

( )
  LindaLeeJacobs | Feb 15, 2020 |
Brilliant. I don't know why this isn't taught in schools more. There are totally beautiful moments in this story that really remind me of Tale of Two Cities. ( )
  slmr4242 | Oct 16, 2019 |
Dickens' books typically abound with coincidences but they will usually be explained. Not here. Dickens didn't explain how Varden the locksmith came to be friends with Haredale (you do wonder because of their different backgrounds), how Edward Chester came to be friends with the locksmith's family and how Edward joined up with Joe Willet in the midst of the riots. Also, Dickens didn't explain how Hugh took away Dolly and Emma in the chaos of the fire (if he did, I certainly missed it). But as usual, there are some delicious scenes when the wicked get their just desserts, like Miggs and the hangman Dennis. And John Chester has to be one of the evilest men Dickens created. In addition, Dickens' description of the fire burning down Harehale's house is one to savor with his eye for details, creating a vivid image in your mind. ( )
  siok | Sep 1, 2019 |
This review is written with a GPL 4.0 license and the rights contained therein shall supersede all TOS by any and all websites in regards to copying and sharing without proper authorization and permissions. Crossposted at WordPress, Blogspot & Librarything by Bookstooge’s Exalted Permission

Title: Barnaby Rudge
Series: ----------
Author: Charles Dickens
Rating: 4 of 5 Stars
Genre: Classic
Pages: 864
Format: Digital Edition

Synopsis:


Barnaby Rudge is a young man who is an idiot. He never grew up past 6 and can't remember one day from the next. He lives with his widowed mother on a stipend from Mr Haredale, the estate owner that Barnaby's father worked for before he vanished all those years ago on the night that a murder was committed.

Mr Haredale, a staunch Catholic, has a niece named Emma. Her father was the man murdered all those years ago and now Mr Haredale is her guardian. She is in love with a young man named Edward Chester, the son of Mr Chester. Mr Chester and Mr Haredale are at odds with one another and neither guardian nor father want the match to happen. Emma also has a companion named Dolly Varden.

Dolly Varden lives in London with her father and mother. Her father is a jolly blacksmith while her mother is one of those creatures that only Dickens can bring to the page. Gabriel Varden has an apprentice, one Simon Tappertitt, who is in love with Dolly, hates Gabriel for some reason and thinks he is the most beautiful specimen of manhood to ever exist. Dolly is in love with Joe Willet.

Joe Willet is a young man whose father runs the Maypole, an inn that belongs to Mr Haredale. Joe Willet Sr is constantly treating Joe Jr like a boy and eventually Joe runs away and joins the army.

The main story is about how all of these characters interact through the 5 years leading up to the riots in 1780 in London, where a mob ran riot for several days in protest against Catholics and Catholicism. Barnaby is dragged into it, not knowing any better. Joe has returned from America (where he fought against American Independence, boo hiss!) and Edward Chester has returned from the Continent after having learned to make his living. Simon Tappertitt kidnaps Dolly and Emma during the riots, gets his just desserts and becomes a legless beggar by the end of the story. Mr Haredale and Mr Chester have a duel in which Chester dies. Mr Haredale gives his blessing and fortune to Emma and Edward. Joe Jr returns with an arm missing and his father starts treating him like an adult. Joe Jr and Dolly get married and run the Maypole together. Barnaby goes to jail for participating in the riots and is about to be hung when he gets a pardon because Joe Jr and Edward Chester work like the dickens (ha!) to get him free.

My Thoughts:

This was not plot oriented at all. Given, most of Dickens' books center around his characters, but this one more so. The Riot of '80 was the event that tied this all together.

I enjoyed this but it took me over 2 weeks to work my way through. I'd read a chapter and then put the book down for the rest of the day. Given, Mrs B was away for a family visit and I was dealing with job interviews and thinking about the future, so I was obviously distracted but still, I had to concentrate to pick this up.

I really don't know what else to say. If you enjoy Dickens, you'll enjoy this. This is probably not the book to start a Dickens Journey of Discovery though. This wasn't quite as organic as some of Dickens other books and it shows. That is why I kept this at 4stars like last time.

I can say that one needs uninterrupted time, without stress or pressure, to fully appreciate Dickens. If one is harried, distracted and busy, it takes away from the experience.

★★★★☆ ( )
  BookstoogeLT | Aug 23, 2019 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 31 (seguinte | mostrar todos)

» Adicionar outros autores (134 possíveis)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Dickens, Charlesautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Bowen, JohnEditorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Browne, Hablot KnightIlustradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Buckland, A. H.Ilustradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Cattermole, GeorgeIlustradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Spence, GordonEditorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Tillotson, KathleenIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Vance, SimonNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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'What dark history is this?'This is the question that hangs over Dickens's brooding novel of mayhem and murder in the eighteenth century. Set in London at the time of the anti-Catholic Gordon Riots, Barnaby Rudge tells a story of individuals caught up in the mindless violence of the mob. Lord George Gordon's dangerous appealto old religious prejudices is interwoven with the murder mystery surrounding the father of the simple-minded Barnaby. The discovery of the murderer and his involvement in the riots put Barnaby's life in jeopardy. Culminating in the terrifying destruction of Newgate prison by the rampaging hordes,the descriptions of the riots are among Dickens's most powerful.Written at a time of social unrest in Victorian Britain, Barnaby Rudge explores the relationship between repression and liberation in private and public life. It looks forward to the dark complexities of Dickens's later novels, whose characters also seek refuge from a chaotic and unstable world.

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Penguin Australia

2 edições deste livro foram publicadas por Penguin Australia.

Edições: 0140437282, 0141199695

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