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Prophet Song por Paul Lynch
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Prophet Song (original 2023; edição 2023)

por Paul Lynch (Autor)

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5382844,293 (4.31)114
"On a dark, wet evening in Dublin, scientist and mother-of-four Eilish Stack answers her front door to find two officers from Ireland's newly formed secret police on her step. They have arrived to interrogate her husband, a trade unionist. Ireland is falling apart, caught in the grip of a government turning toward tyranny. As the life she knows and the ones she loves disappear before her eyes, Eilish must contend with the dystopian logic of her new, unraveling country. How far will she go to save her family? And what-or who-is she willing to leave behind? Exhilarating, terrifying, and surprisingly intimate, Prophet Song offers a shocking vision of a country at war and a deeply human portrait of a mother's fight to hold her family together"--… (mais)
Membro:nashjmf
Título:Prophet Song
Autores:Paul Lynch (Autor)
Informação:Oneworld Publications (2023), Edition: 1, 320 pages
Coleções:A sua biblioteca, Para ler
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Prophet Song por Paul Lynch (2023)

  1. 00
    The Narrow Road to the Deep North por Richard Flanagan (kjuliff)
    kjuliff: Both extremely well written novels on the effects of war on civilians or POWs.
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Mostrando 1-5 de 27 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
This book was pretty much the enactment of all my fears about what would happen if we lose our democracy. I don't usually read dystopian literature, and after this, it will be a long time before I read another. Don't get me wrong--I'm NOT bashing this book. It took me a while to get into it, but once things went from disturbing to downright harrowing, I couldn't put it down.

The novel is set in Ireland in a time the government has labelled "the crisis." In the opening chapter, two Garda (policemen) arrive at the home of Eilish and Larry, a couple with four children ranging in age from an infant to 16. Larry isn't home, but they ask Eilish to have him come down to the station the next day. Larry is a top officer in the Teacher's Union. He goes to the station but never returns.

The situation is bad for everyone, and it only gets worse. Employers are pressed to get rid of anyone the government has a beef with, people start disappearing off the street, lawyers are afraid to represent anyone with a complaint against the government, civil rights are suspended, food supplies are short, protesters are shot and beaten to death, strict curfews are enacted, boys as young as 16 are taken out of school and conscripted into the military. And Eilish is left to fend for herself and her children and the father across town who is falling into senility.

I won't say more as I don't want to spoil the book for anyone else, but the last few chapters are among the most heartbreaking and horrifying that I have ever read. Anyone who thinks that our country needs a strong man dictator and suspension of our Constitutional rights in order to "save" this country should read it (since obviously they never read their world history books in school). It's beautifully written, mainly from Eilish's point of view. ( )
4 vote Cariola | Feb 14, 2024 |
So upset my review failed to save. I came here to remember the quote I pulled from the end of the book. Luckily I think I remember: All end-of-the-world events are local. The prophet song is the song that reminds us that everywhere all the time someone's world is ending, some crisis is afoot, some Kafkaesque dystopian is being hatched.
The story of a family having to deal with a sudden authoritarian government, when those crucial questions of IF to leave turn into HOW to leave—and the terror of that change of question—is really well told in this book. Feels close and real, and as the prophet song reminds us, it would be good to remember how close and real it is.
  BookyMaven | Feb 14, 2024 |
SPOILERS: Upon reaching the end, I couldn't help sensing that I'd witnessed an elaborately dilatory exercise, all designed for the purpose of simply getting the reader to that closing image. And no doubt Lynch thinks himself terribly clever in delivering that ethnic inversion. Unfortunately, if the population of the West ends up fleeing in little dingies, there will be no place to flee to. ( )
1 vote BeauxArts79 | Feb 13, 2024 |
Summary: A mother tries to hold her family and life together as Ireland descends into authoritarian rule.

Paul Lynch’s Prophet Song, winner of the 2023 Booker Prize is a tough read in two respects. One is seeing the unraveling of a democratic society through the disbelieving eyes of Eilish stack, an educated, middle class mother who works for a biotech company. It is disturbing becausew of how close to home it strikes.

The other respect is the text, written without paragraphs with dialogue without quotation marks. Yet this running text reflects increasingly unsettled and anxious perceptions of Eilish, fusing dialogue, emotions, and interior thought. We sense her movement back and forth from disbelief to concern, from hollow assurances that even her children don’t believe to rising fear, from clinging to the hope that her “disappeared” will come home to the realization that no one taken by the government comes home, from the illusion that she can preserve her home and way of life and that their only hope is flight. It’s the increasingly frantic and instinctive thought of one who loses husband, two sons, her job, her respect as “traiter” is spray-painted on her car and home, as her neighborhood becomes a battleground between the regime and the resistance, and finally her flight with her daughter and infant son, having to pay “fees” at numerous checkpoints as she they try to flee. The running text takes us inside her mind and we live the growing terror with Eilish.

It all begins when the National Alliance Party takes over the Republic of Ireland, declares emergency powers and suspends the constitution including writs of habeas corpus. The reality comes home when her husband Larry, a leader in a teacher’s union, goes out to a protest–and never returns. Her eldest son Mark has to go into hiding to avoid the drafting of 17 year-olds. He joins the resistance. After infrequent communications on burner phones, Eilish hears no more, but persists in hoping he will come home. Then, after a list of draft-dodgers, including her son, is published, she learns her services are no longer required. Meanwhile, her father, across town, is descending into dementia. Yet, in his occasional lucid moments, he tells her she must take the children and leave.

Subsequently, her neighborhood becomes front lines in the battle between the Party and the resistance. Power and water are intermittent and the gone. Buildings around suffer bombardment. Yet she uses all her resources, including money from her sister for her to get out of the country to survive. She can’t let go of hope that her husband and son will come home. Only when another son goes missing does she realize that she must save the two who remain–if she can.

The story takes us into the powerful disbelief that democracy really can’t unravel and how rapidly a society can consume itself when it does. We also see how powerful the urge is to try to hold onto home, onto some shred of normalcy. We glimpse how bad things must get for someone to flee from home and become a refugee. When Eilish’s neighborhood becomes a warzone, her running narrative gives the reader of what lived reality must be like in Gaza and other warzones.

Paul Lynch takes us to a place those of us in the West resist going. We join Eilish in denial that it can happen here–that our institutions, the rule of law, our education, jobs, and suburbs will protect us. He forces us to look into the dark abyss through the eyes of Eilish to recognize the vulnerability of all of this when we embrace unfettered power rather than the less “efficient” processes of the rule of law and democratic legislative processes. His book reminds us that the possibility of effective resistance after the fact is far more perilous than resisting beforehand, as inconvenient as that may be. Is this book a “Prophet Song” for us? ( )
1 vote BobonBooks | Feb 8, 2024 |
This book won the Booker Prize for 2023. It was not a unanimous choice and I can see why. It takes place in modern day Ireland and a new government has come to power and they have passed an emergency power act which gives them sweeping powers. It is the beginning of a descent into totalitarianism. The story is about Elish Stack and her family. She is a biologist and her husband Larry is an official in a trade union. We see how their life begins to deteriorate from their comfortable existence as the impacts of the government erode the peoples' rights and eventually descend into a civil war. The book focuses of Elish trying to hold her family together as first her husband Larry and son Mark disappear. She has trouble accepting the situation and keeps believing that things will return to. normal. The books shows the impacts on everyday people as chaos reigns and society falls apart. It is a very disturbing novel but one that shows what people are currently living through in places like Ukraine, Gaza, Haiti, Venezuela etc. It is unrelenting in the horror that Elish faces and is not easy to read but you keep with it for the so called hopeful ending. Doesn't come. Also the style Lynch uses is not easy. There are no punctuations to distinguish between dialogue and non-dialogue. Many authors are using this style. now and in this case it adds to the bleakness of the novel. For me it was a bit off putting and impacted my rating. A worthwhile book for our times and scary as we head into our 2024 election. ( )
1 vote nivramkoorb | Feb 6, 2024 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 27 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
With his winding, dread-filled sentences and without paragraph breaks, Lynch plunges readers into this nightmare and scarcely provides any space to breathe....At times, the novel's relentless bleakness made it almost unbearable to read. And yet its plausibility kept me from looking away....The lesson for readers is not necessarily to wake up to signs of totalitarianism knocking at our doors, but to empathize with those for whom it has already called.
adicionada por Lemeritus | editarNPR, Kristen Martin (Dec 11, 2023)
 
Lynch stays deliberately vague, partly so that the story can serve as a more general allegory, but there’s a cost to the allegory, too. Without an emergency, without any kind of immediate history, it’s hard to understand what the nationalists are fighting for ... This is not a funny book; it’s fairly relentless, even before things go haywire. I wouldn’t have minded a little more acceptable, less intense life ... Lynch’s decision to leave the political context blank starts to pay off. What’s happening to Eilish opens out into a much larger and older story of displacement, as she struggles to find a passage with whatever family she has left into something like civilization.
adicionada por Lemeritus | editarNew York Times, Benjamin Markovits (sítio Web pago) (Dec 1, 2023)
 
His story about the modern-day ascent of fascism is so contaminated with plausibility that it’s impossible not to feel poisoned by swelling panic ... Eilish is a carefully-drawn portrait of affection and grit ... [A] relentless novel. It’s written in the grammar of dread. The sentences cascade from one to the next without so much as a moment’s breath. And with no paragraph breaks to cling to, every page feels as slippery as the damp walls of a torture chamber. I have not read such a disturbing novel since Richard Flanagan’s The Narrow Road to the Deep North, which won the Booker Prize almost 10 years ago.
adicionada por Lemeritus | editarThe Washington Post, Ron Charles (sítio Web pago) (Nov 27, 2023)
 
Irish writer Lynch conveys the creeping horror of a fascist catastrophe in a gorgeous and relentless stream of consciousness illuminating the terrible vulnerability of our loved ones, our daily lives, and social coherence. Eilish muses over the fragility of the body, its rhythms and flows, diseases and defenses. The body politic is just as assailable. A Booker Prize finalist, Lynch's hypnotic and crushing novel tracks the malignant decimation of an open society, a bleak and tragic process we enact and suffer from over and over again.
adicionada por Lemeritus | editarBooklist, Donna Seaman (Nov 1, 2023)
 
I don’t know when I last read a book that left me as shaken and disturbed as Paul Lynch’s fifth novel. It is a tremendous achievement, telling a dark story of a society’s descent into war that resonates far beyond Ireland....This is one of the most important novels of 2023....Paul Lynch is a fearless writer — unafraid of taking on large themes and tackling them face to face. The story recounts a mother’s experience of life in suburban Dublin, as it is transformed by a tyrannical government into a war zone. While it is Irish in detail, its events recall those seen nightly on the news....Prophet Song is an extraordinary achievement, totally realistic, demonstrating the power of fiction to enhance our empathy for those elsewhere, living through horrors beyond our everyday experience., witnessed only on the TV screen.
 
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"On a dark, wet evening in Dublin, scientist and mother-of-four Eilish Stack answers her front door to find two officers from Ireland's newly formed secret police on her step. They have arrived to interrogate her husband, a trade unionist. Ireland is falling apart, caught in the grip of a government turning toward tyranny. As the life she knows and the ones she loves disappear before her eyes, Eilish must contend with the dystopian logic of her new, unraveling country. How far will she go to save her family? And what-or who-is she willing to leave behind? Exhilarating, terrifying, and surprisingly intimate, Prophet Song offers a shocking vision of a country at war and a deeply human portrait of a mother's fight to hold her family together"--

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