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Making Sense of Japanese: What the Textbooks…
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Making Sense of Japanese: What the Textbooks Don't Tell You (edição 2002)

por Jay Rubin (Autor)

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297690,380 (4.07)4
Foreign Language Study. Nonfiction. HTML:Making Sense of Japanese is the fruit of one foolhardy American's thirty-year struggle to learn and teach the Language of the Infinite. Previously known as Gone Fishin', this book has brought Jay Rubin more feedback than any of his literary translations or scholarly tomes, "even if," he says, "you discount the hate mail from spin-casters and the stray gill-netter."
To convey his conviction that "the Japanese language is not vague," Rubin has dared to explain how some of the most challenging Japanese grammatical forms work in terms of everyday English. Reached recently at a recuperative center in the hills north of Kyoto, Rubin declared, "I'm still pretty sure that Japanese is not vague. Or at least, it's not as vague as it used to be. Probably."
The notorious "subjectless sentence" of Japanese comes under close scrutiny in Part One. A sentence can't be a sentence without a subject, so even in cases where the subject seems to be lost or hiding, the author provides the tools to help you find it. Some attention is paid as well to the rest of the sentence, known technically to grammarians as "the rest of the sentence."
Part Two tackles a number of expressions that have baffled students of Japanese over the decades, and concludes with Rubin's patented technique of analyzing upside-down Japanese sentences right-side up, which, he claims, is "far more restful" than the traditional way, inside-out.
"The scholar," according to the great Japanese novelist Soseki Natsume, is "one who specializes in making the comprehensible incomprehensible." Despite his best scholarly efforts, Rubin seems to have done just the opposite.
Previously published in the Power Japanese series under the same title and originally as Gone Fishin' in the same series.
… (mais)
Membro:NenadN
Título:Making Sense of Japanese: What the Textbooks Don't Tell You
Autores:Jay Rubin (Autor)
Informação:Kodansha USA (2002), 144 pages
Coleções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:currently-reading

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Making Sense of Japanese: What the Textbooks Don't Tell You por Jay Rubin

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Mostrando 1-5 de 6 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
A tidy little book on Japanese language and usage, which I looked into as a possible pathway to the intermediate level after working through the two volumes of Genki. It is not a textbook in the usual sense, but a set of concise essays or expositions of particular parts of the language. The section on the use of the particles wa and ga, usually called 'subject matters' in a loose sense, is particularly detailed: the author demonstrates the subtle, but very real differences in the sense conveyed by the two particles respectively, and the misunderstandings that can arise if they are used mechanically. It's a short book, so you don't mind if it doesn't actually drill you in higher grammar or new vocabulary. At the end of this short but dense essay, one realizes that an average Japanese sentence has a number of particles and connectors, that are probably not covered in an introductory course, but which have to be sorted out if any sense is to be made! So this book is not for the beginner. ( )
  Dilip-Kumar | Feb 26, 2022 |
What a treat! Almost 5 stars, if only I wasn't lost for most of it. I don't know how to speak Japanese, and am a rank beginner in terms of learning to read it, so some of the trickier bits sailed past me--but it was astonishing how much I grasped, and how enjoyable it was to read about the intricacies of this language from an opinionated, humorous, knowledgeable author.

I even ran around quoting bits of it to uninterested friends, colleagues, and family, that's how much I liked it. It reads like a series of blog posts of varying lengths on several subjects, and you're sure to find a few of them to your taste, if not all.

(Note: 5 stars = amazing, wonderful, 4 = very good book, 3 = decent read, 2 = disappointing, 1 = awful, just awful. I'm fairly good at picking for myself so end up with a lot of 4s). I feel a lot of readers automatically render any book they enjoy 5, but I grade on a curve! ( )
  ashleytylerjohn | Oct 13, 2020 |
Docking a star for misogyny and general douche-baggery. ( )
  AshLaz | Jan 24, 2020 |
It's too bad this awesome book is out of print because it really helps you to learn to think in Japanese. It should be a required text for every college Japanese course! ( )
  RosemerrySong | Oct 31, 2015 |
It does not seem possible that a book providing a rigorous comparative grammar for Japanese and English could be funny, well paced, and well written. But Making Sense of Japanese does just that. For those in the first three years of the difficult climb to proficiency in Japanese, this book will give you a pleasant lift. Rubin's concept of the "zero pronoun" provides an elegant answer to the enigma of the particles は and が。 ( )
  Chalkstone | Apr 10, 2015 |
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Previously published in the Power Japanese series as Gone Fishin’ and under the same title.
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Foreign Language Study. Nonfiction. HTML:Making Sense of Japanese is the fruit of one foolhardy American's thirty-year struggle to learn and teach the Language of the Infinite. Previously known as Gone Fishin', this book has brought Jay Rubin more feedback than any of his literary translations or scholarly tomes, "even if," he says, "you discount the hate mail from spin-casters and the stray gill-netter."
To convey his conviction that "the Japanese language is not vague," Rubin has dared to explain how some of the most challenging Japanese grammatical forms work in terms of everyday English. Reached recently at a recuperative center in the hills north of Kyoto, Rubin declared, "I'm still pretty sure that Japanese is not vague. Or at least, it's not as vague as it used to be. Probably."
The notorious "subjectless sentence" of Japanese comes under close scrutiny in Part One. A sentence can't be a sentence without a subject, so even in cases where the subject seems to be lost or hiding, the author provides the tools to help you find it. Some attention is paid as well to the rest of the sentence, known technically to grammarians as "the rest of the sentence."
Part Two tackles a number of expressions that have baffled students of Japanese over the decades, and concludes with Rubin's patented technique of analyzing upside-down Japanese sentences right-side up, which, he claims, is "far more restful" than the traditional way, inside-out.
"The scholar," according to the great Japanese novelist Soseki Natsume, is "one who specializes in making the comprehensible incomprehensible." Despite his best scholarly efforts, Rubin seems to have done just the opposite.
Previously published in the Power Japanese series under the same title and originally as Gone Fishin' in the same series.

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