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Hidden in Plain View: A Secret Story of…
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Hidden in Plain View: A Secret Story of Quilts and the Underground… (edição 1999)

por Jacqueline Tobin, Raymond G. Dobard

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
5611132,760 (2.95)13
The fascinating story of a friendship, a lost tradition, and an incredible discovery, revealing how enslaved men and women made encoded quilts and then used them to navigate their escape on the Underground Railroad.   In Hidden in Plain View, historian Jacqueline Tobin and scholar Raymond Dobard offer the first proof that certain quilt patterns, including a prominent one called the Charleston Code, were, in fact, essential tools for escape along the Underground Railroad. In 1993, historian Jacqueline Tobin met African American quilter Ozella Williams amid piles of beautiful handmade quilts in the Old Market Building of Charleston, South Carolina. With the admonition to "write this down," Williams began to describe how slaves made coded quilts and used them to navigate their escape on the Underground Railroad. But just as quickly as she started, Williams stopped, informing Tobin that she would learn the rest when she was "ready." During the three years it took for Williams's narrative to unfold--and as the friendship and trust between the two women grew--Tobin enlisted Raymond Dobard, Ph.D., an art history professor and well-known African American quilter, to help unravel the mystery. Part adventure and part history, Hidden in Plain View traces the origin of the Charleston Code from Africa to the Carolinas, from the low-country island Gullah peoples to free blacks living in the cities of the North, and shows how three people from completely different backgrounds pieced together one amazing American story. With a new afterword. Illlustrations and photographs throughout, including a full-color photo insert.… (mais)
Membro:atlantaquakers
Título:Hidden in Plain View: A Secret Story of Quilts and the Underground Railroad
Autores:Jacqueline Tobin
Outros autores:Raymond G. Dobard
Informação:Anchor Books
Colecções:A sua biblioteca, Race, Racism, and People of Color Collection
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Slavery - United States - History

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Hidden in Plain View: A Secret Story of Quilts and the Underground Railroad por Jacqueline L. Tobin

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Mostrando 1-5 de 11 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
This book is a breath of fresh air in terms of presenting oral histories as valid, and folk history as usable in an academic setting. Forms of record-keeping which are not written using methods recognized by dominant cultures, whether academia, today, or the former empires of England, Spain, etc, are almost always discounted, or destroyed, as the Quipus of the Incan empire.

These quilts are essentially, it sounds, like an updated form of Quipu (Khipu) made from fabric rather than strands of yarn or twine cordage.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quipu

Page 29 made me think of the strain sometimes found between differing cultural interpretations and valuations of oral history and what makes a fact a fact, or something 'obvious,' well, obvious. In other words, the academic methodology versus intuitive oral tradition. As a phd student, I was horrified at the first presentation I attended by a fellow doctoral student. She presented her preliminary findings based on two years of research, and I found myself thinking that if any of my family could see this, they would all tell me I was wasting my time and money in doing research, if I would end up presenting findings as blindingly obviousl as hers. But, as on Page 31, the fear of ridicule forces one to follow a methodology that can be at odds with what one's gut instincts say are obvious. And when those two ways of thinking clash, it is the dominant culture that wins.

Thanks to these many authors for making non-dominant cultural histories valid again.
Shira Destinie
Willaim-James-MEOW Date: 27 August, 12014 H.E. ( )
  FourFreedoms | May 17, 2019 |
This book is a breath of fresh air in terms of presenting oral histories as valid, and folk history as usable in an academic setting. Forms of record-keeping which are not written using methods recognized by dominant cultures, whether academia, today, or the former empires of England, Spain, etc, are almost always discounted, or destroyed, as the Quipus of the Incan empire.

These quilts are essentially, it sounds, like an updated form of Quipu (Khipu) made from fabric rather than strands of yarn or twine cordage.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quipu

Page 29 made me think of the strain sometimes found between differing cultural interpretations and valuations of oral history and what makes a fact a fact, or something 'obvious,' well, obvious. In other words, the academic methodology versus intuitive oral tradition. As a phd student, I was horrified at the first presentation I attended by a fellow doctoral student. She presented her preliminary findings based on two years of research, and I found myself thinking that if any of my family could see this, they would all tell me I was wasting my time and money in doing research, if I would end up presenting findings as blindingly obviousl as hers. But, as on Page 31, the fear of ridicule forces one to follow a methodology that can be at odds with what one's gut instincts say are obvious. And when those two ways of thinking clash, it is the dominant culture that wins.

Thanks to these many authors for making non-dominant cultural histories valid again.
Shira Destinie
Willaim-James-MEOW Date: 27 August, 12014 H.E. ( )
  ShiraDest | Mar 6, 2019 |
Read this for Tomball Library Non-Fiction Book Group. I have wanted to check this book out for some time and was glad to have it pop up on my book club list.

Interesting read but not sure of the plausibility I have read some accounts that discount the information based on when certain quilt designs are know to appear.

( )
  yvonne.sevignykaiser | Apr 2, 2016 |
In 1994,Jacqueline was visiting historic Charleston when she stopped at the famous Old Marketplace and was drawn to a stand selling beautiful quilts. She bought one and the vendor, an elderly African American woman, started to tell her a story about how quilts were used by slaves to communicate on the Underground Railroad. This was something Jacqueline had never heard before but several months passed before she began what was to become a long, and fascinating quest to learn about the secret codes of the quilts. With the help of many historian and quilters, she traced African cultural history, cultural memory, oral history and the stories of codes, spirituals, and secret societies both in Africa and in the USA. Mrs. Ozella McDaniel Williams, the woman who initially sold Jacqueline the quilt and started her on her journey, was a *griot*, an African term for a storyteller and keeper of cultural and heritage, usually passed down from generation to generation. Gradually, the quilt code patterns were revealed. The various patterns used in quilting, from the designs, to the colours, to the stitching, each represented a message, a direction or a directive, guiding the slaves in their attempts to escape slavery and make their way north to Canada and freedom. Since slaves in the 1800s were not legally allowed to learn to read or write, their songs, or spirituals also often contained coded messages, thus rendering songs and quilts - all *hidden in plain view* - a sort of audio-visual form of communication between them.

One particular example I found fascinating was that each *safe* station along the way had a code name. For example Detroit, Michigan was *Midnight*, and Dresden, Ontario (Canada) was *Dawn*. The coded message *from Midnight to Dawn* meant to travel from Detroit to Dresden. This was given as a sample of a specific coded message but it struck me particularly because I happen to also have another book by Jacqueline Tobin, published 8 years after Hidden in Plain View. Its title? From Midnight to Dawn - The Last Tracks of the Underground Railroad. Suddenly, that title took on a whole new meaning for me.

Hidden in Plain View has illustrations, photos, a glossary and a timeline, and is fascinating reading, giving new insight into a part of history we thought we knew but are still learning about. ( )
  jessibud2 | Feb 17, 2016 |
The book was such inspiration to me that I began and completed my first quilt. Many African Americans are not aware of how important quilts were in the Underground Railroad Great Escape Procedures. Quilting Blocks were used as creative pictorial communication devices just as our ancient ancestors used pictorial communication in our Kamitic (Ancient Egyptian) African Culture. Talk about "By Any Means Necessary" to attain "God Given Freedom", this was a major intelligent task. Many of the symbols used in African Textiles many, many years ago are used in todays quilts.
In response to "oregonobessessionz" surely you don't think that you can conclude that base on so called facts relating to the people with a "History of Slavery" that you are aware of what was going on among the "slaves" networking together to find ways to be free of bondage. To know truth you must live it. So therefore unless your family members were slaves themselves how can you determine what creative abilities "slaves" possessed (which is the reason why these Talented People were such a hot commodities) before they were forced into bondage to free themselves. You should be mindful of the fact that these people ("slaves") had a rich civilization before the undeveloped Northern Caucasian came down from the mountains wagging war on civilized people all over Europe and Africa to name a few. I think that you owe it to yourself and your family to research "African History" before you conclude what so called "slaves" were or were not capable of base on a short time line. Slavery has a Three Hundred Year plus time line. I think your research is grossly incomplete because it is not holistic reasoning. I am certain that many secrets among "slaves" were never revealed to this day. I Thank God for the many people who secretly assisted and died in the operation of the "Underground Railroad" to help free (Slaves) people from bondage. A "God Given" right is to have free will so that we may all equally share in our development into our most highest spiritual nature.
Peace and Love
  CherylAJ | Feb 11, 2016 |
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The fascinating story of a friendship, a lost tradition, and an incredible discovery, revealing how enslaved men and women made encoded quilts and then used them to navigate their escape on the Underground Railroad.   In Hidden in Plain View, historian Jacqueline Tobin and scholar Raymond Dobard offer the first proof that certain quilt patterns, including a prominent one called the Charleston Code, were, in fact, essential tools for escape along the Underground Railroad. In 1993, historian Jacqueline Tobin met African American quilter Ozella Williams amid piles of beautiful handmade quilts in the Old Market Building of Charleston, South Carolina. With the admonition to "write this down," Williams began to describe how slaves made coded quilts and used them to navigate their escape on the Underground Railroad. But just as quickly as she started, Williams stopped, informing Tobin that she would learn the rest when she was "ready." During the three years it took for Williams's narrative to unfold--and as the friendship and trust between the two women grew--Tobin enlisted Raymond Dobard, Ph.D., an art history professor and well-known African American quilter, to help unravel the mystery. Part adventure and part history, Hidden in Plain View traces the origin of the Charleston Code from Africa to the Carolinas, from the low-country island Gullah peoples to free blacks living in the cities of the North, and shows how three people from completely different backgrounds pieced together one amazing American story. With a new afterword. Illlustrations and photographs throughout, including a full-color photo insert.

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