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Comet in Moominland (Puffin Books)
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Comet in Moominland (Puffin Books) (original 1946; edição 1967)

Séries: Mumin (2)

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1,697387,673 (4.18)59
When Moomintroll learns that a comet will be passing by, he and his friend Sniff travel to the Observatory on the Lonely Mountains to consult the Professors. Along the way, they have many adventures, but the greatest adventure of all awaits them when they learn that the comet is headed straight for their beloved Moominvalley.… (mais)
Membro:dannysutton
Título:Comet in Moominland (Puffin Books)
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Informação:Penguin Books (1967), Paperback
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:****
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

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Comet in Moominland por Tove Jansson (1946)

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» Ver também 59 menções

Inglês (32)  Sueco (3)  Finlandês (2)  Alemão (1)  Todas as línguas (38)
Mostrando 1-5 de 38 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Ah, there's Snuffkin. I'm so happy! ( )
  wetdryvac | Mar 2, 2021 |
The Moomins, a family of trolls, have appeared in my life in various ways; I vaguely remember having read (or having been read) one of the novels as a young child - as an older child I remember the animated series on television. I happened across it by accident and spent much time in enjoyable confusion about the names and natures of the seemingly infinite cast of characters. This year I decided I wanted to find out more than my hazy memories could tell me and in the process stumbled across the fact that Tove Jansson had written and drawn a Moomin strip comic for a British newspaper and I acquired the first volume of the collected strip comics and read it. I was pleasantly surprised to find it densely but gently satirical as well as pleased to find that the bizarre imagination (particularly for characters who are mythic or completely invented creatures) was most definitely as I recalled.

This meant I still didn't know what the novels were like, but encouraged by the high quality of the comic strip and my memories, I decided to give Comet in Moominland a go - selected because it was the first written (though not first published, I think) of the Moomin novels.

It turned out to be a delightful, pleasant book, strong on imagined characters and incidental mystery - what is a Snufkin? Just how much difference is there between a Troll and a Snork? Everybody and everything is introduced blithely as if common-place without any real requirement for detailed explanation. Everybody knows what a Hattifattener is, really - description is almost superfluous.

The plot is epic compared to those in the volume of comic strips I read - the fate of Moomin Valley (and the rest of the world, really) is at stake and an arduous journey is undertaken to request knowledge and help in saving the day.

The gentle satire is present but in lesser quantity - a philosopher who states that everything is Unnecessary, is never-the-less rather keen on creature comforts (all the more so because he is a creature - a Muskrat)and not being destroyed by the impact of a celstial body. Not keen enough to actually help avert the crisis, however. The scientists that Moomintroll appeals to for information and help take no interest, but pour out all their knowledge to the Snork Maiden when asked about their work...

Contrast of characters is also used to give a Message about the moral and physical dangers of too much attachment to physical belongings (a sentiment expressed in the comic strip, too). The characters are also used to promote the virtues of friendship and familial love. Moomintroll's faith that his mother, Moominmama will fix everything if only they can get back to her in time, is touching - hasn't there been a time in all our lives when we had absolute faith that Mum could resolve any problem satisfactorily?

I suppose it is not too much of a spoiler to reveal that Moomintroll, friends and family, The Valley of the Moomins and even the rest of the planet survive to return in more books; I look forward to reading them.

I would say that comparing Comic Strip vol.1 to Novel 1, the strip has just a slight edge in my opinion because it is more densely packed with satire, but that a greater focus on plot is suited to the novel as a form, so perhaps each should be enjoyed for their own merits and comparison should not be dwelled on too much.

Now, if only some-one would tell me what order the rest of the novels are meant to be read in....
( )
  Arbieroo | Jul 17, 2020 |
It’s so relaxing. Straightforward, hugely visual, there’s forests and caves and oceans and sailing, it’s all the adventure my mind needs, with friends and love and comfort. It’s very nice. ( )
  jtth | May 4, 2020 |
My cousin, Diane, has some fascination/connection with Finland, and that's where I first encountered Moomins, from perusing her FaceBook posts. I gather that they are sort of hippo-like forest trolls, or something. No idea, but apparently in Finland they're wildly popular. I read a book by the Moomin creator, Jove Jansson, but it had nothing to do with Moomins, just weird, slightly depressed Finnish people. So, I finally broke down and went to the library to get a dead-tree Moomin book because my library didn't carry any kindle books featuring Moomins. [It was my first time in our newly refurbished library, and I must say it's awesome. I might take up reading dead-tree books again just to have the chance to go to the library more often.]

Anyway, this was a most delightful book. Just what I needed after finishing something about the horrors of racism. So, Moomintroll lives in a blue Moominhouse with Moominmamma and Moominpapa. I think, maybe, Sniff, who is a "little animal"—sort of like a mouse perhaps—, also lives with them. First Moomintroll and Sniff go off on an adventure and discover a cave. They also come in contact with Snuffkin, a wanderer, with whom they become fast friends. Then they hear about a comet that is hurtling toward earth. So they're off on another adventure to an observatory to ask the scientists about the comet and it's potential dangers. They collect up some more companions along the way, most notably Snork Maiden, with whom Moomintroll develops a romance. They discover that the comet is indeed a danger and they have only a short time to warn people in Moomin valley to flee. They get back, just in the nick of time, move all their stuff into the cave and survive the comet. Something like that.

My synopsis is, of course, a bit simple minded, but that's not the fault of the book. This is a delightfully written story that reads like a very good bed time story, somewhat like the first couple of Dr. Doolittle books or The Hobbit. Interestingly, I conned my spouse into reading this book and she was less impressed. "A bit bland", I think was her comment. She thought I'd be better served by re-reading The Wind in the Willows, or Winnie the Pooh. So, now I have those two in kindle format for reading in the near future. But first, the next in the Moomin series, Finn Family Moomintroll.
( )
1 vote lgpiper | Jun 21, 2019 |
https://nwhyte.livejournal.com/3091856.html

This was the first full Moomin novel, pubished in 1946 but written in the shadow of war, and it’s not too difficult to see the metaphor of the world-altering disaster threatened here in the shape of a comet aproaching the Earth. Against this ominous background, Moomintroll, who is the central character of most of the Moomin books, along with Sniff (who fulfills a younger sibling role) and Snufkin (the Best Friend) go to the Observatory to ask advice from the Astronomer. On the way they make friends with two more siblings, the Snork and the Snork Maiden. After a series of adventures (including a dragon and a carnivorous tree), they get to the Observatory and there the Astronomer nonchalantly informs them that there is no hope - the comet will destroy everything. They return home across a devastated landscape with scurrying refugees, and at the last moment as they prepare for the end, all comes right and the world is saved.

This is bleak and scary stuff for the young target audience, and I remember being chilled by it as I first read it. At the same time there is always a sense that Moominmamma and Moominpappa will provide security in an uncertain world, the tale is told with plenty of humour, and time is found for parties and good food and drink (mostly coffee of course). It is beautifully illustrated by Jansson herself (as are all the Moomin books). It’s clearly an early work - rather episodic, despite the grim over-arching narrative, and without the attention to character that we would get later on. So I think a younger child would enjoy it most, but there is plenty for us grownups too. ( )
1 vote nwhyte | Sep 23, 2018 |
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» Adicionar outros autores (6 possíveis)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Jansson, Toveautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Järvinen, LailaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Polet, CoraTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Portch, ElizabethTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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The Moomin family had been living for some weeks in the valley where they had found their house after the dreadful flood (which is a different story).
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Wikipédia em inglês (1)

When Moomintroll learns that a comet will be passing by, he and his friend Sniff travel to the Observatory on the Lonely Mountains to consult the Professors. Along the way, they have many adventures, but the greatest adventure of all awaits them when they learn that the comet is headed straight for their beloved Moominvalley.

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Penguin Australia

2 edições deste livro foram publicadas por Penguin Australia.

Edições: 0140302867, 0141328614

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