Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquisar O Sítio Web
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

A carregar...

The Ghost Mountain Boys: Their Epic March and the Terrifying Battle for…

por James Campbell

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
1996103,597 (3.92)18
"New Guinea is among the world's largest islands. In 1942, when World War II exploded onto its shores, it was an inhospitable, cursorily mapped, disease-ridden land of dense jungle, towering mountain peaks, deep valleys,and fetid swamps. Coveted by the Japanese for its strategic position, New Guinea became the site of one of the South Pacific's most savage campaigns. Despite their lack of jungle training, the 32nd Division's Ghost Mountain Boys were assigned the most grueling mission of the entire Pacific campaign: to march 130 miles over the rugged Owen Stanley Mountains and to protect the right flank of the Australian army as they fought to push the Japanese back to the village of Buna on New Guinea's north coast." "Comprised of National Guardsmen from Michigan and Wisconsin, reserve officers, and draftees from across the country, the 32nd Division lacked more than training - they were without even the basics necessary for survival. The men were not issued the specialized clothing that later became standard issue for soldiers fighting in the South Pacific; they fought in hastily dyed combat fatigues that bled in the intense humidity and left them with festering sores. They waded through brush and vines without the aid of machetes. They did not have insect repellent. Without waterproof containers, their matches were useless and the quinine and vitamin pills they carried, as well as salt and chlorination tablets, crumbled in their pockets. Exhausted and pushed to the brink of human endurance, the Ghost Mountain Boys fell victim to malnutrition and disease. Forty-two days after they set out, they arrived two miles south of Buna, nearly shattered by the experience." "Arrival in Buna provided no respite. The 32nd Division was ordered to launch an immediate assault on the Japanese position. After two months of furious - sometimes hand-to-hand - combat, the decimated division finally achieved victory. The ferocity of the struggle for Buna was summed up in Time magazine on December 28, 1942, three weeks before the Japanese army was defeated: "Nowhere in the world today are American soldiers engaged in fighting so desperate, so merciless,so bitter, or so bloody." Reminiscent of classics like Band of Brothers and The Things They Carried, this harrowing portrait of a largely overlooked campaign is part war diary, part extreme adventure tale, and (through letters, journals, and interviews) part biography of a group of men who fought to survive in an environment every bit as fierce as the enemy they faced."--BOOK JACKET.… (mais)
Nenhum(a)
A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Ver também 18 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 6 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
A well written book covering the Buna campaign, focusing on the titular Ghost Mt Boys. This all occurred early in the war and pitted woefully unprepared troops against a savage island. The Japanese troops suffered as badly and possibly worse. The drive that was required to push a military action thru to a conclusion is hard to comprehend in the 21st century. The suffering of the frontline troops is described in detail and is difficult to absorb.
The leadership of the armies was groping to find a solution and under tremendous opposition within their own sides. A hell of a way to fight a war.
The author is clear that his task was to tell a specific story, not the whole battle or campaign. He does this well.
The soldiers who carried this fight to the end deserve the highest regard. War is ugly and the war in this corner of the world, particularly so. ( )
  Whiskey3pa | Feb 9, 2021 |
The harrowing story of the U.S. 32nd Infantry Division – a National Guard division – and their long trek across the treacherous New Guinea jungle/swamp/mountains in 1942/43 to help the Australian Army expel the Japanese from the island. The division took serious casualties, not only from battle but from a variety of jungle diseases, their condition exacerbated by a lack of proper equipment and supplies.

General Douglas MacArthur, commander of the Southwest Pacific Forces, fresh from having been run out of the Philippines, is unflatteringly portrayed as more of a master of publicity than a master of war and tactics. ( )
  Hagelstein | Jan 23, 2019 |
I am not going to even attempt to review this one. There is a wonderful review posted by J. Green that speaks to the book better any attempt I may make. I do have some personal thoughts that I will add:
- The details provided of the wounded and the fighting are graphic and not for the faint of heart.

- The presentation of MacArthur is not an overly positive one as it tars the war hero, explaining some of the 'fictions' MacArthur wrote and said about the war effort. This didn't surprise me - I had refused to believe he was the amazing leader that he was painted to be - but I was still horrified to learn that he made sweeping statements without even setting foot on the battlefield, AND that his wife and child travelled with him in the Pacific theater during WWII while he was overseeing activities. He took his family into the war zone with him. Good Grief.

- Great presentation of Papua New Guinea, its population, their customs, history and geography which was the real reason I decided to listen to this audiobook as I usually don't read war books of this nature. Some cringe-worthy mentions - like the cannibalism bit and the fact that a wife is shut up in her hut with the dead body of her husband were rather unsettling to read about.

Overall, a well presented, intimate examination of a battle between the Japanese and Allied forces that really reminded me just how global the battles of WWII were, touching corners of the world that do not get the same mention or importance in the history books as the battles that were fought in Europe and the Northern Pacific regions receive. ( )
  lkernagh | Aug 2, 2015 |
The battle for Buna, New Guinea (November 1942 through January 1943), isn't as well-known as others like Guadalcanal. The 32nd Army Infantry Division (National Guard) was tasked with defeating a Japanese army poised for devastating strikes on Australia. Unfortunately, the 32nd was poorly trained and supplied, and had to fight both the Japanese and the jungle. MacArthur and other top brass grossly underestimated the strength and condition of the enemy, which, contrary to their belief was numerous and *not* starving. They were also very deeply entrenched on the island and the 32nd had to resort to "primitive tactics" that guaranteed high casualties, and so many young men were sacrificed needlessly. Weeks of constant fighting turned the green troops into hardened soldiers and they eventually defeated the Japanese, but at terrible cost.

James Campbell does an excellent job of recounting the terrifying battle, striking a good early balance between MacArthur's overall strategy and the experience of the men on the ground - American, Australian, and even Japanese. He effectively points out the folly of generals who "fight" far from the actual fighting (and then take the credit), as MacArthur blamed the National Guardsmen for failing to quickly defeat their enemy without knowing the true conditions or even visiting the island. Told with frequent quotes from letters and journals (Japanese soldiers, too), Campbell puts a very human face on the war, and I couldn't help but wonder at the madness of it all. He regularly quotes from Army surgeon Simon Warmenhoven's letters to home, and one to a young daughter is especially touching.

For readers who want a real whiff of jungle battle, this is an excellent account that reads as easily as a novel and makes you feel like you've been there in the mud with bullets tearing up the foliage all around you. I listened to the audio version, which is read extremely well by Stephen Hoye. ( )
2 vote J.Green | Aug 26, 2014 |
This book was similar to another I read about the Bataan campaign and its prisoners. Ghost Mountain Boys tells the story of the Allied war in New Guinea, a hellish environment to fight in by any account. It goes into detail about the terrible unpreparedness of the US Army for jungle warfare, and how the commanders far from the war zone could not comprehend entire companies of men being reduced to squads by only disease. A good book about the absurdity of war. ( )
  NickBlasta | Jul 17, 2009 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 6 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
sem críticas | adicionar uma crítica
Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Locais importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Acontecimentos importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Filmes relacionados
Prémios e menções honrosas
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Citações
Últimas palavras
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Língua original
DDC/MDS canónico
"New Guinea is among the world's largest islands. In 1942, when World War II exploded onto its shores, it was an inhospitable, cursorily mapped, disease-ridden land of dense jungle, towering mountain peaks, deep valleys,and fetid swamps. Coveted by the Japanese for its strategic position, New Guinea became the site of one of the South Pacific's most savage campaigns. Despite their lack of jungle training, the 32nd Division's Ghost Mountain Boys were assigned the most grueling mission of the entire Pacific campaign: to march 130 miles over the rugged Owen Stanley Mountains and to protect the right flank of the Australian army as they fought to push the Japanese back to the village of Buna on New Guinea's north coast." "Comprised of National Guardsmen from Michigan and Wisconsin, reserve officers, and draftees from across the country, the 32nd Division lacked more than training - they were without even the basics necessary for survival. The men were not issued the specialized clothing that later became standard issue for soldiers fighting in the South Pacific; they fought in hastily dyed combat fatigues that bled in the intense humidity and left them with festering sores. They waded through brush and vines without the aid of machetes. They did not have insect repellent. Without waterproof containers, their matches were useless and the quinine and vitamin pills they carried, as well as salt and chlorination tablets, crumbled in their pockets. Exhausted and pushed to the brink of human endurance, the Ghost Mountain Boys fell victim to malnutrition and disease. Forty-two days after they set out, they arrived two miles south of Buna, nearly shattered by the experience." "Arrival in Buna provided no respite. The 32nd Division was ordered to launch an immediate assault on the Japanese position. After two months of furious - sometimes hand-to-hand - combat, the decimated division finally achieved victory. The ferocity of the struggle for Buna was summed up in Time magazine on December 28, 1942, three weeks before the Japanese army was defeated: "Nowhere in the world today are American soldiers engaged in fighting so desperate, so merciless,so bitter, or so bloody." Reminiscent of classics like Band of Brothers and The Things They Carried, this harrowing portrait of a largely overlooked campaign is part war diary, part extreme adventure tale, and (through letters, journals, and interviews) part biography of a group of men who fought to survive in an environment every bit as fierce as the enemy they faced."--BOOK JACKET.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Ligações Rápidas

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (3.92)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3 2
3.5 6
4 9
4.5 2
5 4

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 157,657,873 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível