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William Tell por Friedrich Schiller
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William Tell (original 1804; edição 1951)

por Friedrich Schiller, Sir Theodore Martin (Tradutor), Charles Hug (Ilustrador), Thomas Carlyle (Introdução), Walter Diethelm (Designer)2 mais, Fretz Freres (Printer), Fretz Freres (Binder)

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905917,816 (3.43)23
When Schiller completed Wilhelm Tell as a "New Year's Gift for 1805" he foretold that it would cause a stir. He was right. In the midst of Great Power politics a play which drew substance from one of the fourteenth-century liberation movements proved both attractive and inflammatory. Since then the work as become immensely popular. This new English translation by William F. Mainland brings out the essential tragi-comic nature of Wilhelm Tell but also emphasizes its impressive formal unity. Schiller based his play on chronicles of the Swiss liberation movement, in which Wilhelm Tell played a major role. Since Tell's existence has never been proven, Schiller, a historian by profession, felt he had to devise a figure who would bring the uncertainties and contradictions of the various Swiss chronicles into focus. Respected for his courage and skill with a bow, for his peaceable nature and his integrity, Schiller's archer--while always ready to aid his fellows--habitually seeks solitude. In the midst of political turmoil Wilhelm Tell is the nonpolitical man of action. Keenly interested in the problematic interplay of history and legend, Schiller turned it to be dramatic advantage. He constructed his play to illustrate the greatest possible development of the character traits suggested for Tell by the chronicles. The result of Schiller's supreme achievement in historical drama.… (mais)
Membro:Sport1963
Título:William Tell
Autores:Friedrich Schiller
Outros autores:Sir Theodore Martin (Tradutor), Charles Hug (Ilustrador), Thomas Carlyle (Introdução), Walter Diethelm (Designer), Fretz Freres (Printer)1 mais, Fretz Freres (Binder)
Informação:[New York] : Limited Editions Club, 1951
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:LEC, Limited Editions Club

Pormenores da obra

William Tell por Friedrich Schiller (Author) (1804)

Adicionado recentemente porknstntn, carlets, Josep-Enric, fey.naomi, DarrylRRC
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Like many other medieval folk-heroes, the early-14th-century Swiss freedom-fighter William Tell turns out to have left little or no solid evidence to prove that he ever existed — the earliest written mentions of his name are about a century after his supposed lifetime, while many of the stories told about him have suspiciously close parallels to much older mythological sources. Nonetheless, he has long been an important symbol of Swiss national identity, and he achieved pan-European status as an icon of liberty around the time of the French Revolution.

Schiller half-jokingly claimed that he had started writing his play in 1803 to put an end to the persistent rumours that he was working on a play about William Tell — in practice the impetus seems to have come mostly from his wife Charlotte, who had a long-standing interest in Swiss culture, and from Goethe. Schiller himself never visited Switzerland, but one of the first things he did when he started work on the play was to order a large-scale map of the Vierwaldstättersee. The stage directions show clear traces of this geographical interest: we are told exactly which mountains should be visible in the background of each scene. For the details of the Tell legend, Schiller mostly followed Aegidius Tschudi's Chronicle, written in the late 16th century. The first performance was in Weimar in March 1804, and the play was published in October of that year.

With his historian's hat on, Schiller introduces a couple of interesting nuances into the story. One aspect of this is a careful attempt to make a distinction between legitimate rebellion against a (local) ruler who oversteps his constitutional authority and wrongful attempts to usurp the divinely appointed authority of the Holy Roman Emperor. Throughout the play, the rebels make it clear that they are only seeking to restore their constitutional rights, and in the penultimate scene Tell turns away the man who has come to him for help after assassinating the Emperor Albrecht. Obviously, that is meant to be relevant to the situation in Germany at the time of writing, and also to the post-1789/post-1776 world more generally. Another nuance is the way he keeps Tell apart from the political leaders of the rebellion: he is a man of action whose personal bravery is an inspiration for others, a decent ordinary man pushed beyond the limits of toleration by an arrogant ruler, but he doesn't make speeches or take part in the Oath on the Rütli, contrary to most Swiss versions of the story.

The play is Schiller's only full-length drama not framed as a tragedy: in the title it is simply "Schauspiel" (a play). Where The bride of Messina only had five named characters, it has about forty. As well as the usual serious debates between political leaders, there are a number of big, set-piece crowd scenes with lots of different things going on at once, much as in Wallenstein's Camp. Especially interesting is the scene (III:iii) where Gessler's men-at-arms, Friesshardt and Leuthold, arrest Tell and are set upon by an angry crowd — Schiller showing us how fragile authority is when it is only based on force — and the gratuitously complex scene in the hollow way in Act IV, when Tell is setting up to assassinate Gessler and all sorts of passers-by (including a complete wedding party) threaten to get in the way.

Of the Schiller plays I've read, this is the one that I can most easily imagine working well on a stage, although it would be an expensive and complex one to produce, and of course it comes with its own historical baggage because of the way it has been adopted as a kind of nationalist ritual by the Swiss. (Hitler also loved it at one point, but is said to have lost interest somewhat when he realised people were identifying him with Gessler...) ( )
1 vote thorold | Oct 18, 2020 |
5
  kutheatre | Jun 7, 2015 |
I learnt to read thanks to a fortnightly magazine called Story Teller that was around in the early 80s – it was one of those publications that came with a cassette taped to the front cover, on which various celebrities of the day could be heard reading out fairytales and children's stories, while you read along in the lavishly-illustrated magazine. Frankly, every child deserves to grow up listening to Brian Blessed bellow out The Elves and the Shoemaker, or Joanna Lumley politely explain Gulliver's Travels.

One of my favourite stories – indeed one of my strongest memories of childhood – was William Tell, which drew on the inspired combination of Tom Baker and Gioachino Rossini (together at last). Of course I didn't know who Tom Baker was then, I just knew I loved the way he enunciated ‘Gessler's black heart’ with such relish; and I certainly didn't know who Rossini was – I probably assumed the Overture was just something they'd come up with for the sake of the Story Teller recording – I only knew that the music got me so riled up that, afterwards, I used to charge around the house in some frenzy, trying to liberate the airing cupboard from the Habsburg Austrian yoke.

If you have a spare few minutes, treat yourself here.

So anyway. Though Schiller had a lot to live up to by the time I finally got around to reading him, his play also found fertile ground. And though I am the least nationalistic person imaginable, I have always had a soft spot for tales of national freedom or independence. This one is put together with consummate skill, different scenes and conversations echoing each other very deftly. The poetic flourishes are well translated in my edition by William F Mainland in the 70s.

The herald cries his summons to the lists,
But no sound comes to these sequestered valleys;
I only hear the melancholy note
Of cowbells and the dreary
ranz des vaches.

There is an interesting tension in the treatment of the central character, who is often discussed but not often on stage. Perhaps it comes from the fact that Schiller, as a professional historian, knew only too well that Tell probably never really existed; Schiller the historian and Schiller the dramatist have, perhaps, slightly different ideas about how large a role he should play. Much of his dialogue consists of regurgitated proverbs, as though he's merely a personification of general folk wisdom – most of it revolving around the theme of self-sufficiency, which is something of a recurring motif here, for people as well as for countries.

I find national myths like this weirdly moving – not so much the original story as the way it has captured the imaginations of so many generations of people. I'm determined to get down to the open-air staging of the play that's put on every summer outside Altdorf, where these legendary events actually ‘happened’. Until then I'll make do with the words on the page – supplemented, natch, by regular doses of Tom Baker. ( )
1 vote Widsith | Sep 9, 2014 |
One of the prominent German figures, Schiller as a playwright promoted democracy. Here, the heroic Swiss huntsman pursues his independent streak while the governor of his canton sees his figure as a threat to his power. You already know the story, but the play delves more into the struggle than just the apple on the head of Tell's son. ( )
  JVioland | Jul 14, 2014 |
Esta obra corresponde a la reedición que Anaya ha llevado o llevó (no sé si sigue) a cabo de los clásicos de la Colección Araluce de literatura infantil y juvenil. Del texto original de Henrietta Elizabeth Marshall, "Stories of William Tell and his Friends", publicada en 1906, la editorial Araluce realizó la adaptación, que publicó entre 1910 y 1920 según se desprende de los registros de la Biblioteca Nacional:

Historia de Guillermo Tell / relatada a los niños por H.E. Marshall. — Barcelona : Editada por Ramón S.N. Araluce, [entre 1910-1920]. — 131 p. : lám. col. ; 15 cm. - (Colección Araluce)

De la que también registra una 5.ª edición con las siguientes diferencias:

Historia de Guillermo Tell / relatada a los niños por H.E. Marshall ; con ilustraciones de Albert. — 5ª ed. — Barcelona : Araluce, [1951] (Myria). — 118 p., 8 lám. ; 15 cm. - (Colección Araluce ; n. 5). — Las lám. son en colores

Ahora (aunque sea 1998) Anaya la recupera y narra la historia de… Suiza. Éste es un libro que debiera titularse algo así como “La libertad de Suiza” o algo parecido. Utiliza el carisma y el atractivo de un personaje como Guillermo Tell para despertar la curiosidad (aunque no sé si los niños de ahora habrán oído hablar alguna vez de ese tal Tell), pero Guillermo sólo aparece tres o cuatro veces.

La maquetación de la serie, de Aderal Tres + Gerardo Domínguez, es muy atractiva, pero (tiene un pero) sucia. En color hueso, la camisa lleva el nombre de la serie y de la editorial en huecograbado (supongo) y troquelada para dejar ver lo que supongo será una reproducción de la cubierta original y que ahora Anaya deja ver en la actual. Se completa con papel de calidad sin brillo y un tamaño de letra grande y generosos márgenes. Legibilidad asegurada.

La novela no deja de leerse bien y cómodamente. No se le notan en exceso los años. Uno espera que el señor Tell nos lleve de aventura tras aventura, pero nada de eso. Tras la escena de la flecha, la manzana y su hijo poco más.

Un libro para nostálgicos y niños habituados a la lectura.

--
Marshall, H. E. (Henrietta Elizabeth) (1867-1941). Guillermo Tell / [relatada a los niños por H. E. Marshall ; con ilustraciones de Albert] ; presentación Luis Alberto de Cuenca ; prólogo Jaime García Padrino. — Madrid : Anaya, 1998. — 127 p. : il. col. ; 24 cm. — (Biblioteca Araluce). — Reedición de "Guillermo Tell" editado por Araluce en 1914. -- ISBN 84-207-8288-2

821.111-311.3"19"
CDU adaptadas:
82-32
82-4 ( )
  Biblioteca-LPAeHijos | Sep 27, 2013 |
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Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Schiller, FriedrichAutorautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Funke, A.Editorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Palmer, Arthur H.Editorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Piatti, BarbaraPosfácioautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Ras, G.Editorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Schmidt, JosefEditorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Schmitz-Mancy, MaximilianContribuidorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

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Es lächelt der See, er ladet zum Bade,/Der Knabe schlief ein am grünen Gestade,/Da hört er ein Klingen,/Wie Flöten so süß,/Wie Stimmen der Engel/Im Paradies.
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Tell: Der brave Mann denkt an sich selbst zuletzt,
Vertrau auf Gott und rette den Bedrängten.
Pfeiffer: Seid ihr erst Oesterreichs, seid ihrs auf immer.
Gertrud: Ertragen muss man, was der Himmel sendet,
Unbilliges erträgt kein edles Herz.
Tell: Was Hände bauten, können Hände stürzen.
Das Haus der Freiheit hat uns Gott gegründet.
Alle: Wir sind Ein Volk, und einig wollen wir handeln.
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When Schiller completed Wilhelm Tell as a "New Year's Gift for 1805" he foretold that it would cause a stir. He was right. In the midst of Great Power politics a play which drew substance from one of the fourteenth-century liberation movements proved both attractive and inflammatory. Since then the work as become immensely popular. This new English translation by William F. Mainland brings out the essential tragi-comic nature of Wilhelm Tell but also emphasizes its impressive formal unity. Schiller based his play on chronicles of the Swiss liberation movement, in which Wilhelm Tell played a major role. Since Tell's existence has never been proven, Schiller, a historian by profession, felt he had to devise a figure who would bring the uncertainties and contradictions of the various Swiss chronicles into focus. Respected for his courage and skill with a bow, for his peaceable nature and his integrity, Schiller's archer--while always ready to aid his fellows--habitually seeks solitude. In the midst of political turmoil Wilhelm Tell is the nonpolitical man of action. Keenly interested in the problematic interplay of history and legend, Schiller turned it to be dramatic advantage. He constructed his play to illustrate the greatest possible development of the character traits suggested for Tell by the chronicles. The result of Schiller's supreme achievement in historical drama.

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