Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquisar O Sítio Web
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

A carregar...

The Manhattan Project: The Birth of the Atomic Bomb in the Words of Its… (2007)

por Cynthia C. Kelly (Editor)

Outros autores: Richard Rhodes (Introdução)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
246185,140 (3.93)7
A collection of writings--including essays, articles, and excerpts from biographies, plays, novels, letters, and oral histories--explores the history of the Manhattan Project and analyzes its legacy.
Nenhum(a)
A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Ver também 7 menções

The Manhattan Project is an ambitious undertaking, taken on by Kelly, the president of the Atomic Heritage Foundation in D.C. Her brief was to present the story of the atomic bomb from the discovery of fission through to today's possibility that terrorist organizations could control this means to destroy the world. The 70 year span includes letters, speeches, eyewitness accounts and oral histories. These last are the most compelling: scientists enmeshed in the overwhelming process of creating a top secret government project describe what it was like to live with the horrifying results of their work.

The chief physicist, J. Robert Oppenheimer and the army's head of the program, Gen. Leslie R. Groves, are the main characters here, two compelling personalities determined to carry out their project in a limited time and bring an end to WWII. The army built three top secret sites in Tennessee, Washington State and Los Alamos, New Mexico where scores of the west's most brilliant scientists and their families lived, assisted by army personnel, most of whom had some scientific background.

The team faced a massive, dangerous task and produced atom and hydrogen bombs in a relatively short time. This "can do" tone changes once the bomb is dropped and much of the second half of the book centers on the aftermath: the morality of dropping the bomb, the horrible effects of destruction and radiation on the people of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and the need for arms control as more and more countries develop their own nuclear programs.

President Eisenhower's "Atoms for Peace" speech at the UN is startling in its eloquence and Oppenheimer's speech to his fellow scientists titled "You Have Done Excellent Work" warns them that their work will be criticized for generations to come.

Questions about whether the bomb should have been dropped on Japan surfaced almost immediately after the event. The creation of the Manhattan Project was due to the Allies' concern that the Nazis were developing a nuclear program; once it was determined in 1944 that no program existed, several MP physicists wanted the project to be abandoned. Some left, appalled that the bomb would be dropped on Japan, a country that never had a nuclear program. Others leaked secrets to the Soviets, fearing a post war world in which one country - the U.S. - could potentially control and threaten all the others.

President Truman and Secretary of War Henry Stimson rationalized that an invasion of Japan could have cost 1 million American lives, a number that was immediately criticized.

The book presents both sides of the argument. Interestingly, Secretary Stimson wrote in 1948: "History is often not what actually happened but what is recorded as such."

Of all the accounts in this book, the most compelling for me was that of John Martin Taylor, whose father was a Los Alamos scientist. Hearing his friends talk about what their fathers did in the war, the 12 year old asked his dad about his war experience:

"He quietly took John Hersey's 'Hiroshima' from the bookshelf and handed it to me.
'Read this.'
The story has haunted me ever since, and my dad has always refused to talk about the work he did as a young chemist on the Manhattan Project."
1 vote NarratorLady | Jan 29, 2010 |
sem críticas | adicionar uma crítica

» Adicionar outros autores

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Kelly, Cynthia C.Editorautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Rhodes, RichardIntroduçãoautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Locais importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Acontecimentos importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Filmes relacionados
Prémios e menções honrosas
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Citações
Últimas palavras
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Língua original
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
DDC/MDS canónico
Canonical LCC

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

A collection of writings--including essays, articles, and excerpts from biographies, plays, novels, letters, and oral histories--explores the history of the Manhattan Project and analyzes its legacy.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Capas populares

Ligações Rápidas

Avaliação

Média: (3.93)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3 2
3.5 1
4 13
4.5
5 3

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 162,498,650 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível