Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquisar O Sítio Web
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

The Thing About Life Is That One Day You'll…
A carregar...

The Thing About Life Is That One Day You'll Be Dead (original 2008; edição 2008)

por David Shields (Autor)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
4062048,212 (3.31)5
The author melds personal history with frank biological data about every stage of life, creating an "autobiography about my body" that seeks meaning in death, but moreover, life. Shields filters his frank--and usually foreboding--data through his own experience as a 51-year-old father with burgeoning back pain, contrasting his own gloomy tendencies with the defiant perspective of his own 97-year-old father, a man who has waged a lifelong, urgent battle against the infirmities of time.--From amazon.com.… (mais)
Membro:evilive
Título:The Thing About Life Is That One Day You'll Be Dead
Autores:David Shields (Autor)
Informação:Knopf (2008), Edition: 1, 225 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Pormenores da obra

The Thing About Life Is That One Day You'll Be Dead por David Shields (2008)

Nenhum(a)
A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Ver também 5 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 20 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Very inventive and unique style. Bits of narrative and memoir were wrapped up in multiple facts of life and death and the human body, with quotes liberally sprinkled in. I can see why some people would roll their eyes at such a book, but I thought it was quite fun despite being a book about death. ( )
  carliwi | Sep 23, 2019 |
Shields uses facts and statistics to distance himself from the emotions he feels about his father. Interspersed stories about their lives show the competitiveness he feels toward him. He also tries to show how closely sex and death are tied together.
Not a very rewarding read. ( )
  juniperSun | Feb 29, 2016 |
This is an unusual book. The author combines myriads of statistics related to human physiological development with reminiscences and current stories about his father. He even includes some stories about his daughter in the first part of the book.

Frankly, its a bit of a mishmash. However, he makes it work with the his (I assume) very honest and personal reflections about his father. ( )
  grandpahobo | Sep 24, 2015 |
The thing about this book is that sometimes it annoys. I actually decided to stop reading it when I was halfway through. But the other thing about this book is that often it's very interesting. Probably it's about half and half, and the half you like better (or the half you'll find annoying) will depend on what kind of writing you respond to.

There are roughly three modes of discourse in the book: the personal/family memoir, the straight scientific fact, and the liberal heaping doses of quotations from others.

The aspects of personal memoir are generally rather interesting. Shields's discussion of life as a quick progression toward sexual maturity and a long, long decline toward death is framed by a kind of sketchy dual biography of himself and his father. It's easy to see why he is fixated on his father, who is 97 at the time of the book's writing. He's a colorful guy, personable, quick with a story, and unrelenting in his desire to live as long as possible.

The scientific facts are often interesting, sometimes depressing in their bare expression of our biological condition. I often found these quite thought-provoking, although at times they provoked thoughts that preferred not to be disturbed. Anyone who is distinctly uncomfortable with contemplating his or her own mortality is hereby warned not to pick up this book. At other times, the litany of facts about the human body, how it matures, perpetuates its genetic code, and eventually breaks down feel too unleavened by some other voice. Fact after fact after fact can weigh on the reader, and after a while I felt justified in skimming some portions.

Finally, the cascade of quotes often have the same effect the scientific facts have. In fact, this is the least engaging aspect of the book. While Shields has plucked many excellent quotes and arranged them in a kind of conversation among themselves at times, this method felt unmediated by an authorial presence at times. Given that his more recent book, Reality Hunger, plays up this mode, it's clear he intended something like this. Perhaps in time this will seem brilliant. For now, given that I'm still very much attached to the kinds of storytelling traditions that Shields seems to find outmoded and restricting, this is where we part ways. I more often skimmed the quotes than I did the science, because, while there is a similar sense in both modes of reading an unmediated recitation of someone else's words, science has a tendency toward a direct, somewhat generic tone. I feel less assaulted by an array of literary "talking heads" when Shields layers on the facts, even if a glance at the source material would suggest he's operating at the same scant level of intervention in both cases.

Having been as annoyed as I've been with this book, I can't give it a particularly high rating. But since I found it compelling enough to come back to it even after quitting it, I can't give it a particularly low rating. Readers seem very much split on this one, either loving it or hating it. I did both in turn, so I'll land in the middle and hope that suggests both the worthwhile benefits of the book and the drawback inherent in its idiosyncratic execution. And in case you're on the fence, I'll reiterate the conclusion that's already featured prominently in the title: Everybody dies, even you. ( )
  phredfrancis | Feb 8, 2014 |
Despite both positive and negative reviews regarding this book and its subject, I think it is worth reading. I explain why, among other things, here: http://mewlhouse.hubpages.com/hub/One-Day-You-Will-Be-Dead ( )
  MSarki | Mar 31, 2013 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 20 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
sem críticas | adicionar uma crítica
Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Locais importantes
Acontecimentos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Prémios e menções honrosas
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Epígrafe
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
That, finally, is all it means to be alive: to be able to die. --J. M. Coetzee
Dedicatória
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
For my father, 1910-
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
A fetus doesn't sit passively in its mother's womb and wait to be fed.
[Prologue] Let the wrestling match begin: my stories versus his stories.
Citações
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
(Carregue para mostrar. Atenção: Pode conter revelações sobre o enredo.)
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Língua original
DDC/MDS canónico
Canonical LCC

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

The author melds personal history with frank biological data about every stage of life, creating an "autobiography about my body" that seeks meaning in death, but moreover, life. Shields filters his frank--and usually foreboding--data through his own experience as a 51-year-old father with burgeoning back pain, contrasting his own gloomy tendencies with the defiant perspective of his own 97-year-old father, a man who has waged a lifelong, urgent battle against the infirmities of time.--From amazon.com.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Capas populares

Ligações Rápidas

Avaliação

Média: (3.31)
0.5
1 5
1.5 2
2 9
2.5 3
3 29
3.5 9
4 28
4.5 2
5 9

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 162,188,430 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível