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The Joys of Love por Madeleine L'Engle
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The Joys of Love (original 2008; edição 2012)

por Madeleine L'Engle, Léna Roy (Introdução)

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2291490,013 (3.36)4
After graduating from college in 1941, Elizabeth Jerrold pursues her dream of becoming a stage actress, landing a position as an apprentice in a summer theater company where she hones her acting skills and falls in love with an aspiring director.
Membro:carolvanbrocklin
Título:The Joys of Love
Autores:Madeleine L'Engle
Outros autores:Léna Roy (Introdução)
Informação:Square Fish (2012), Edition: Reprint, Paperback, 288 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:***
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

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The Joys of Love por Madeleine L'Engle (2008)

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Mostrando 1-5 de 14 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
This was a sweet book but probably not for everyone especially in this day and age.
1940's, girl who wants to be in theatre so agrees to help out as an "apprentice" with a theatrical company which boils down to free labor for the owner and some experience for the apprentices. A chance reading of a part is seen by a famous actress and thus she may or may not be cast into the limelight.
2 boys in love with her--one who is deserving and one who is a jerk.
A couple of interesting side lines but not great. ( )
  carolvanbrocklin | Sep 18, 2014 |
The Joys of Love is a coming-of-age story set in the world of summer stock theatre just after the second World War.

Elizabeth's Aunt Harriet does not approve of the theatre, but it's been Elizabeth's dream ever since she can remember. Elizabeth's parents are dead, and her strict aunt has seen to her upbringing, but Elizabeth made a deal with Aunt Harriet before going to college: if Elizabeth studied chemistry and graduated with honors, she would be allowed a summer working in the theatre. And, finally, that summer has arrived. Elizabeth managed to secure an unpaid apprenticeship, and Aunt Harriet begrudgingly sends a weekly check for room and board. Elizabeth is having the time of her life with her new friends... and Kurt. Kurt Canitz is the charismatic young director, and he finds Elizabeth's naivete refreshing. Elizabeth is a bit starstruck and madly in love. She knows he doesn't exactly love her, not the way that she loves him, but she turns a deaf ear to her friends' warnings about the danger Kurt poses to her heart. And of course there's plenty of other backstage drama as well. Just when it looks like both love and theatrical success are within Elizabeth's grasp, things fall apart. Will Elizabeth have to give up on her dreams?

Published after L'Engle's death, this early novel of hers is a sweet and simple story drawing on her own experiences as a young woman in the theatrical world. The book's title is a reference to the song "Plaisir D'Amour" -- "The pleasure of love lasts only a moment / The grief of love lasts a lifetime." Elizabeth is full of love for both Kurt and the world of the theatre, but when Kurt disappoints her (as it's obvious he's going to do; that's hardly a spoiler, right?), she has to grow up a bit and take a look at the theatrical world that she's idealized, and decide whether it's still what she wants to do if it's not as gleaming and perfect as it seemed from Aunt Harriet's spare bedroom. I really enjoyed this book, though it's perhaps not as deep and complex as some of L'Engle's better-known books. ( )
  foggidawn | Aug 31, 2014 |
"The theatre isn't college, Elizabeth."
"No. It's not. But I'm still Elizabeth Jerrold, whether I'm in college or the theatre."

Hear, hear! ( )
  NadineC.Keels | Apr 10, 2014 |
What really struck me as I was reading this early L'Engle is how her recurring themes were fully formed already. Also, her love of the apt quote is very evident. The story is, in fact, a little clunky and moralistic- but it's also a L'Engle, so it transcends this slight clunkiness and pulls one into the characters. The story is nearly universal as a coming-of-age tale, and the moment when Elizabeth notices her life has begun made me well up. I marvel anew at L'Engle's skill, if this is an example of where she began- head and shoulders above so many seasoned writers. I also loved the forward from the granddaughter I remember from L'Engle's nonfiction. That said, I'll not read it again, I don't like the people well enough. The main character is a moralistic stick, the villain is a right bastard without a redeeming characteristic and the repetition of (admittedly period) gag-inducing "endearments" was nearly enough to make me long for something by Dworkin.

Recommended for any L'Engle fan. ( )
  satyridae | Apr 5, 2013 |
I'll tell you right now, this one is no Ring of Endless Light. That said, it is really a four-and-a-half-star book - the extra half-star because it's Madeleine L'Engle, who herself holds a special place in my heart.

Around the middle of the book, the main character, Elizabeth, reminds the reader about the actors' rule: Always leave the audience wanting more. L'Engle absolutely has done that with this book, & I did indeed want more. Then again, it was a lovely way to end the book, with the future beckoning from a distance. I can't tell if it is because she never had a chance to revise the book and finish it properly (unlikely, I think, given the granddaughter's introduction) or if it was just a happy accident. ( )
  cat-ballou | Apr 2, 2013 |
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Roy, LénaIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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The summer theatre was on a pier that jutted off from the boardwalk over the sand.
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After graduating from college in 1941, Elizabeth Jerrold pursues her dream of becoming a stage actress, landing a position as an apprentice in a summer theater company where she hones her acting skills and falls in love with an aspiring director.

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