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The Poetic Edda por Carolyne Larrington
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The Poetic Edda (edição 2014)

por Carolyne Larrington (Traduction)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaDiscussões / Menções
2,238215,157 (4.12)1 / 41
Young were the years when Ymir made his settlement,there was no sand nor sea nor cool waves;earth was nowhere nor the sky above,chaos yawned, grass was there nowhere.The sun turns black, earth sinks into the sea,the bright stars vanish from the sky;steam rises up in the conflagration,a high flame plays against heaven itself.Seeress's Prophecy 3, 57The collection of Norse-Icelandic mythological and heroic poetry known as the Poetic Edda contains the great narratives of the creation of the world and the coming of Ragnarok, the Doom of the Gods. The mythological poems explore the wisdom of the gods and giants, narrating the adventures of thegod Thor against the hostile giants and the gods' rivalries amongst themselves. The heroic poems trace the exploits of the hero Helgi and his valkyrie bride, the tragic tale of Sigurd and Brynhild's doomed love, and the terrible drama of Sigurd's widow Gudrun and her children.Many of the poems predate the conversion of Scandinavia to Christianity, allowing us to glimpse the pagan beliefs of the North. Since the rediscovery of the Poetic Edda in the seventeenth century, its poetry has fascinated artists as diverse as Thomas Gray, Richard Wagner, and Jorge Luis Borges.This is the first complete translation to be published in Britain for fifty years, and it includes a scholarly introduction, notes, a genealogy of the gods and giants, and an index of names.… (mais)
Membro:jtlauderdale
Título:The Poetic Edda
Autores:Carolyne Larrington (Traduction)
Informação:OUP Oxford (2014), Edition: 2, 384 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Scandinavian history, Norse mythology

Pormenores da obra

The Poetic Edda por Anonymous

Adicionado recentemente porLauraDuncan, joshnyoung, SarahSunbeemz, OrderMustBe, Cl56, Rae3791
Bibliotecas LegadasC. S. Lewis, Carl Sandburg
  1. 90
    The Nibelungenlied: Prose Translation (Penguin Classics) por Anonymous (andejons)
    andejons: Much of the story of Nibelungenlied is also told in the poetic Edda, but in considerably shorter form but with some extra material. There are also many points that differ.
  2. 40
    The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrun por J. R. R. Tolkien (guurtjesboekenkast)
    guurtjesboekenkast: De legende van Sigurd en Gudrún bevat twee epische gedichten die zijn gebaseerd op Oudnoorse mythen die bekendstaan als de Edda. Tolkien herschreef deze legende in twee modern Engelse gedichten. Samen vormen deze het verhaal van de drakendoder Sigurd, de wraak van Gudrún en de val van de Nibelungen.… (mais)
  3. 30
    The Skalds A Selection of Their Poems, with Introduction and Notes por Lee M. Hollander (Rowntree)
    Rowntree: An interesting examination of skaldic verse forms.
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» Ver também 41 menções

Inglês (15)  Holandês (3)  Sueco (2)  Francês (1)  Todas as línguas (21)
Mostrando 1-5 de 21 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
I picked this volume up serendipitously, as part of a trade at one of my local used book stores. This was a fantastic volume. I'd never read any Norse mythology or epic poetry, only the snippets I'd picked up in comic books or movies. This was so much better and having read reams of Greek and Roman mythology and epics, it was cool to see the various similarities we humans have in explaining the world around us.

Several of the poems reminded me of Hesiod's Theogony (e.g. The Seeress's Prophesy, Vafthrudnir's Sayings, Grimnir's Sayings) as well as his Works and Days (e.g. The Sayings of the High One). The former when the Poetic Edda covers the history of the universe and the gods and people in it; the latter when it covers morals, duties, social contracts, and such. The Lay of Atli & the Greenlandic Poem of Atli were had similar instances to the Atreus and Thyestes dining "fiasco." I also saw the idea of asking for a decent burial from the one who kills you, like Hector asking Achilles in the Iliad, in the Greenlandic Poem of Atli (Verse 102-4, p. 233).

I loved the creation myth in the Seeress's Prophecy, especially this: "From the south, Sun, companion of the moon, / threw her right hand round the edge of the heaven, / Sun did not know where her hall might be, / the stars did not know where their place might be, / the moon did not know what power he had" (Verse 5, p. 4).

The Sayings of the High Ones had many useful nuggets, many of which pop up throughout the world and throughout time as useful aphorisms. For example: "The foolish man lies awake all night / and worries about things; / he's tired out when the morning comes / and everything's just as bad as it was" (Verse 23, p. 17). Also, on gluttony, we have: "Cattle know when they ought to go home, / and then they leave the pasture; / but the foolish man never knows / the measure of his own stomach" (Verse 21, p. 17). Finally, in today's world, this is still sage advice: "You should never bandy words / with a stupid fool" (Verse 122, p. 31).

The translation by Carolyne Larrington was wonderful. Her general introduction and the introductions to each poem were short, fantastic and eminently useful. ( )
  drew_asson | Dec 3, 2020 |
2 v. in 1 ( )
  ME_Dictionary | Mar 19, 2020 |
Hollander's translation is the only book that I've ever bought twice; my first copy is locked away in storage and inaccessible, but I had a strong desire to read it, so bit my tongue and put down the money. I'm Norwegian-American down to my socks, but Norse mythology is something that I've had a bit of a love-hate relationship with over the years. While there's a flavor that hits home with me, there's also something distinctly foreign about the pre-Westernized Scandinavians that is off-putting. I think it's the anti-egalitarian, anti-altruism, "might is right" brutal spirit of the Vikings. It's fun for mild-mannered Scandinavians and those of the diaspora to joke about, but in reality Norway, Sweden, and Denmark have long since grown beyond that era and left it in the dust. I'm far more familiar with Asbjørnsen and Moe's collection of 19th century folktales, which I find to be more culturally relevant for me.

But the time had come for me to read the Viking-era myths, so I gave the Poetic Edda a read. Some takeaways:

1) I knew that "trolls" had some sort of representation in the Norse era. I did not realize how often the word would be used (alongside others such as "thurs") as a synonym for "giant" (Hollander's "etins"). I also did not realize that the same rule found in Asbjørnsen and Moe, that trolls turn to stone when exposed to daylight, was present in Viking times. I thought that was a development from eight hundred years later.

2) I found that I didn't care much for the Óthin. I found him sinister, not what I would expect for a king of gods. Conversely, I found Thór completely likeable. No wonder the common people in ancient times worshipped Thór, leaving Óthin to the Viking warriors and ruling class.

3) I've read "The Volsunga Saga" before, and I didn't like it. Nor did I like the Sigurd lays in this Edda. I think that, out of all the Old Norse material, the Volsungs story has the least connection to modern Scandinavia.

4) Lee Hollander refers to many different scholars in his translation, but the two that he seems to appreciate the most (based on the quantity of his footnote references) are Sophus Bugge and N.F.S. Grundtvig. There was a coffee shop in Oslo called "Bugges" (Bugge's) that I became fond of while visiting cousins a few years ago (they told me at the time that it was named after a famous writer). And as a Lutheran, I'm very familiar with some of Grundtvig's hymnody ("Built on a rock, the church shall stand, even as temples are falling" and "Den signede dag"). I had no idea that Grundtvig the theologian was also Grundtvig the Norse mythology buff. It was fun to make these two connections. ( )
  Sylvester_Olson | Jul 1, 2018 |
I bought this book several years ago and by several I mean many but never got around to reading it in its entirely. I thought it was about time I did that, so.. well, I did. Although it took me ages to finish it, that is in no way a reflection on the quality of the book itself - more my ability to be distracted, etc. So, let's get on with the review.

As someone not terribly familiar with Norse myth, I came away from the book feeling that I understood the essence of it a bit better. Having recently traveled to Austria, and in previous years been to much of the Baltic region, I felt that those trips supplemented my understanding of the text a bit more than the copious notes at the back of the book did.

The way that the book was set up was a bit troubling to me. The notes at the back of it, rather than say.. footnotes, or notes on the side of the page, made for much flipping. At times, the notes were just reminders of the meaning of certain words (e.g. norns and disir) rather than truly supplementary or explanatory material.

The translation of the texts was good, if a bit.. heady. Having the translation be rather literal, including phrases such as "slaughter dew" when referencing blood, or "foot twigs" instead of toes always came off as a rather interesting choice. It added to the feel of the text itself - you could never forget you were reading something fairly ancient, rather than bringing the ancient into a more modern time period such as [a:Seamus Heaney|29574|Seamus Heaney|http://photo.goodreads.com/authors/1200407647p2/29574.jpg]'s translation of [b:Beowulf|52357|Beowulf|Unknown|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1298256739s/52357.jpg|189503] did.

All in all, I did enjoy the book, but it would not be remiss for me to look into more contemporary or, rather, just alternate translations of what I read. I'm tempted to read Snorri's translation of the Prose Edda, though, which would be an even more.. insurmountable sort of task. Perhaps I should look up easier guides to the Nordic mythology prior to doing so, so I'm not jumping in entirely brainlessly. ( )
  Lepophagus | Jun 14, 2018 |
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Anonymousautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Saemund SigfussonAlleged authorautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Dronke, UrsulaEditor and Translatorautor principalalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Jonsson, FinnurEditorautor principalalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Larrington, CarolyneTradutorautor principalalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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Am 21. April 1971 lief ein dänisches Kriegsschiff mit einer Delegation dänischer Regierungsmitglieder und Parlamentsabgeordneter im Hafen von Reykjavik ein, wo es von einer vieltausendköpfigen Menschenmenge am Kai erwartet wurde ; fast die ganze isländische Regierung war anwesend.
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Young were the years when Ymir made his settlement,there was no sand nor sea nor cool waves;earth was nowhere nor the sky above,chaos yawned, grass was there nowhere.The sun turns black, earth sinks into the sea,the bright stars vanish from the sky;steam rises up in the conflagration,a high flame plays against heaven itself.Seeress's Prophecy 3, 57The collection of Norse-Icelandic mythological and heroic poetry known as the Poetic Edda contains the great narratives of the creation of the world and the coming of Ragnarok, the Doom of the Gods. The mythological poems explore the wisdom of the gods and giants, narrating the adventures of thegod Thor against the hostile giants and the gods' rivalries amongst themselves. The heroic poems trace the exploits of the hero Helgi and his valkyrie bride, the tragic tale of Sigurd and Brynhild's doomed love, and the terrible drama of Sigurd's widow Gudrun and her children.Many of the poems predate the conversion of Scandinavia to Christianity, allowing us to glimpse the pagan beliefs of the North. Since the rediscovery of the Poetic Edda in the seventeenth century, its poetry has fascinated artists as diverse as Thomas Gray, Richard Wagner, and Jorge Luis Borges.This is the first complete translation to be published in Britain for fifty years, and it includes a scholarly introduction, notes, a genealogy of the gods and giants, and an index of names.

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