Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

A carregar...

No title (1987)

Séries: Country Girls trilogy (Omnibus 1-3)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
5571131,691 (3.86)34
The country is Ireland. The girls are Kate Brady and Baba Brennan. This trilogy tells the story of their escape from countryside and convent out into the world, into the bright city lights of Dublin and, naive and reckless, into a whirl of flirtations and passionate misadventures.
Membro:
Título:
Autores:
Informação:
Colecções:
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Pormenores da obra

The Country Girls Trilogy and Epilogue por Edna O'Brien (1987)

Nenhum(a).

Nenhum(a)
A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Ver também 34 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 11 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
I enjoyed two out of the three books in Edna O'Brien's "The Country Girls Trilogy and Epilogue." Probably unsurprisingly, I enjoyed the first two books, (which are on the 1,001 Books to Read before you Die list and are much stronger installments) much more than the final book.

The story mainly follows Caithleen, who has the misfortune to grow up poor with a deceased mother and drunkard father in rural Ireland. Her relationship with her frenemy Baba is all pervasive in her life and changes its course. Over the course of the series, the girls grow up and get kicked out of school, move to Dublin where they date, dance and drink with a variety of men, and later move on to marry just the wrong guys.

I disliked the switch in narration in the third book to Baba's point of view -- it really didn't provide any enlightenment about her character -- it actually made her more one-dimensional to me. I liked the first two books enough that I found the series enjoyable overall though. ( )
  amerynth | Oct 28, 2018 |
Do not read the Introduction unless you want the entire plot laid out before you read it.

The first book of the trilogy opens with gentle suspense as the ordinary daily life of a girl, her mother, and their hired man
revolves around speculation and fears about the fate of the missing, violent drunken father.

The story flows seamlessly between conversations and evocative descriptions of Irish country landscapes.
Then it moves into endless details of the interactions of the two country girls,
Caithleen passive, Baba a mean bully, and their respective mothers, passive and mean.

Men are uniformly drunk, deplorable, predatory, violent, and otherwise questionable as fathers, husbands,
friends, and priests. The Gentleman is the sole exception and eventually he peters out.

Girls get themselves expelled from their convent school and move to Dublin where Baba becomes slightly subdued since she is no longer feared by her friend.
Plot drags with clothing obsessions and boredom.

The Lonely Girl picks up two years later with some powerful landscape descriptions brightening an otherwise repetitive crawl toward seduction.
Eugene Gaillard's pursuit of innocent Kate is a long and improbable stretch where she is deserted by yet another married man.

Story moves to pathos with: "It is the only possession I have which I regard as mine, that cork with the round silver top."
It continues reciting the boring lives of two ordinary young women beset by stupidity and not transformed by any passion for creating,
for caring for others, for compassion, or for love. Empty and repetitive.

Eventually, in Girls in Their Married Bliss, Kate's needy, jealous, and fearful insecurity drives her husband away.
Eugene, who surprisingly returned to claim her after his desertion, is the only character I liked.
Despite his obsessive tendencies, he was the only intelligent one with a real sense of humor, irony, and truth.

While this may be a realistic depiction of the lives of the girls, it becomes predictably unredeemable and depressing:
"If nothing else, she'd get drunk."

Though the tame sexual episodes were shocking in their time, it is the pervasive Catholic negativity which amazed me,
expected from the priests, but unquestioned by the girls' families and the various people of the town.
It was also unusual to see no mention of father/daughter incest and Catholic complicity. ( )
  m.belljackson | Jan 6, 2018 |
Wishy wash mamby pamby romance which I only read because it was on the 1001 List. Big mistake. It only made it on the list because The Charwoman's Daughter was mentioned. ( )
  ShelleyAlberta | Jun 4, 2016 |
The Country Girls Trilogy and Epilogue is a compilation of three novels that span the lives of two girls, from childhood through middle age, who were both rivals and friends in rural Ireland. The first of the three novels, The Country Girls introduces us to Caithleen and Baba. Caithleen is practically raised by a single mother, her father often drunk and absent, leaving them with little or no money most days, while Baba's father is good provider who comes home every night, even if the family isn't exactly a happy one. Together they go off to a convent school, Caithleen on scholarship, Baba out of jealousy. The second book in the set, Lonely Girls (more commonly known by the name Girl With Green Eyes), picks up where the first leaves off, in Dublin, where the girls are set to start their lives. They live together as boarders, Baba to attend school, and Caithleen working in a grocery. What they are really looking for though is freedom and men, rich if Baba has anything to say about it. The final book of the series, Girls In Their Married Bliss opens with both of the girls marriages, both of them seemingly getting exactly what they wanted. Yet nothing is ever as it seems, and life still has many surprises in store for both of them.

Both the first and second book were told by Caithleen, later known as Kate, while the last of the trilogy and the epilogue are narrated by Baba. Kate was often ruled by her emotions, and though intelligent, she let her feelings blind her to common sense and reality. Baba is far more pragmatic; she is also brazen and bold, and in my opinion makes a far more interesting character, though Kate's story is richer. In the end, I quite enjoyed all of the books and I'm glad I read them together in one book, because I'm not sure that I would have made a point to continue soon after the first.

Both The Country Girls and Girl With Green Eyes can be found on the list of the 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die, though I actually enjoyed the last book far more. The story told in Married Bliss, while much darker, was more interesting and far richer. Yet, without the first two preceding it, it couldn't have been told. These are quintessential coming-of-age stories, both realistic and tragic, telling a story that unfolds every day, in every town and city. ( )
  Mootastic1 | Jan 15, 2016 |
The Country Girls Trilogy by Edna O'Brien (Plume Publishing, 1960) is a difficult book that you will heartily devour. Difficult because of the always looming tragedy that the reader can instantly sense, as though the characters have no hope of escaping their bleak destinies. This is a tale of a tumultuous friendship between Caithleen "Kate" Brady and Bridget "Baba" Brennan, and the role of women in 1950s Ireland. - See more at: http://thekeytothegate.blogspot.com/2013/07/the-country-girls-trilogy-by-edna-ob... ( )
  rebeccaskey | Jul 29, 2013 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 11 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
sem críticas | adicionar uma crítica

» Adicionar outros autores

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
O'Brien, Ednaautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Erichsmeier, Jovitaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Lameris, MarianTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
McBride, EimearPrefácioautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Muñoz, Regina LópezTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Locais importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Acontecimentos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Prémios e menções honrosas
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
For Susan Lescher
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
I wakened quickly and sat up up in bed abruptly.
Citações
Últimas palavras
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Língua original
DDC/MDS canónico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

The country is Ireland. The girls are Kate Brady and Baba Brennan. This trilogy tells the story of their escape from countryside and convent out into the world, into the bright city lights of Dublin and, naive and reckless, into a whirl of flirtations and passionate misadventures.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Ligações Rápidas

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (3.86)
0.5
1 3
1.5
2 2
2.5 1
3 22
3.5 8
4 29
4.5 1
5 27

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 155,829,575 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível