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Joy Division's Unknown Pleasures (Thirty…
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Joy Division's Unknown Pleasures (Thirty Three and a Third series) (edição 2004)

por Chris Ott (Autor)

Séries: 33 1/3 (9)

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1524143,911 (3.88)1
Joy Division's career has often been shrouded by myths. But the truth is surprisingly simple: over a period of several months, Joy Division transformed themselves from run-of-the-mill punk wannabes into the creators of one of the most atmospheric, disturbing, and influential debut albums ever recorded. Chris Ott carefully picks apart fact from fiction to show how Unknown Pleasures came into being, and how it still resonates so strongly today. EXCERPT The urgent, alien thwack of Stephen Morris' processed snare drum as it bounced from the left to right channel was so arresting in 1979, one could have listened to that opening bar for hours trying to figure how on earth someone made such sounds. Like John Bonham's ludicrous, mansion-backed stomp at the start of "When The Levee Breaks"-only far less expensive-the crisp, trebly snare sound with which Martin Hannett would make his career announced Unknown Pleasures as a finessed, foreboding masterpiece. Peter Hook's compressed bass rides up front as "Disorder" comes together, but it's not until the hugely reverbed, minor note guitar line crashes through that you can understand the need for such a muted, analog treatment to Hook's line. Layering a few tracks together to create a six-string shriek, Hannett's equalization cuts the brunt of Sumner's fuller live sound down to an echoing squeal, revealing a desperation born of longing rather than rage. This is the way, step inside.… (mais)
Membro:THBevilacqua
Título:Joy Division's Unknown Pleasures (Thirty Three and a Third series)
Autores:Chris Ott (Autor)
Informação:Continuum (2004), 136 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
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Joy Division's Unknown Pleasures (Thirty Three and a Third series) por Chris Ott

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Mostrando 4 de 4
Surely the best book in this very uneven series: enjoyable and enlightening combination of biography, criticism, technical analysis, and appreciation. ( )
1 vote gtross | Nov 7, 2020 |
It's interesting to read one of these buggers about an album you don't really like. Closer is such a better album. I agree with the reviewers on here that the writing is amateurish, and many of the events described a readily available in a lot of different mediums. Oh wait, I thought this was a book about a musical album, not a biography of a singer? It's a shame Martin Hannett never produced Cabaret Voltaire. ( )
  librarianbryan | Apr 20, 2012 |
Fascinating that the (early) live version of Joy Division apparently differed so strikingly from the recorded, until Martin Hanett's production ideas were picked up by the band for later albums. Ott argues that Ian Curtis liked the sound, but the rest of the band was far more taken with a brash punk sound, though they loved Curtis' lyrics. So pronounced was the dislike that Peter Hook (bassist) and Bernard Sumner (guitarist) thought Hanett hijacked their songs. And understandably so, based on the description of the difference in sounds, and how much the guitar & bass were pushed to the background.

Overall a worthwhile read for me, but I had extended zero effort looking up band history, so maybe it's not the best available. Ott's descriptions frequently veer into blank description: telling, not showing how the band's sound broke new ground, or how the songwriting improved over time. I tend to agree (based on listening to the music), but in these cases Ott's view doesn't stand on its own. On the other hand, he doesn't needlessly dramatize Curtis' suicide, and in fact puts it into context. I didn't know, for example, Curtis battled with epilepsy, and it's striking how autobiographical his lyrics can be. ( )
  elenchus | Dec 8, 2008 |
I thought this would be an overly pedantic study of the album, but it is really more of an overview of ALL of Joy Division's recordings with little focus on "Unknown pleasures" itself. This wasn't unwelcome to me as someone who always gets confused as to the chronology of Joy Division recordings. Moreover, the book contains a decent (but not overwhelming) amount of biographical anecdotes which, ultimately, makes this a very readable and enjoyable book. ( )
  readgrrl | Feb 12, 2008 |
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Joy Division's career has often been shrouded by myths. But the truth is surprisingly simple: over a period of several months, Joy Division transformed themselves from run-of-the-mill punk wannabes into the creators of one of the most atmospheric, disturbing, and influential debut albums ever recorded. Chris Ott carefully picks apart fact from fiction to show how Unknown Pleasures came into being, and how it still resonates so strongly today. EXCERPT The urgent, alien thwack of Stephen Morris' processed snare drum as it bounced from the left to right channel was so arresting in 1979, one could have listened to that opening bar for hours trying to figure how on earth someone made such sounds. Like John Bonham's ludicrous, mansion-backed stomp at the start of "When The Levee Breaks"-only far less expensive-the crisp, trebly snare sound with which Martin Hannett would make his career announced Unknown Pleasures as a finessed, foreboding masterpiece. Peter Hook's compressed bass rides up front as "Disorder" comes together, but it's not until the hugely reverbed, minor note guitar line crashes through that you can understand the need for such a muted, analog treatment to Hook's line. Layering a few tracks together to create a six-string shriek, Hannett's equalization cuts the brunt of Sumner's fuller live sound down to an echoing squeal, revealing a desperation born of longing rather than rage. This is the way, step inside.

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