Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquisar O Sítio Web
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

Washington: The Making of the American…
A carregar...

Washington: The Making of the American Capital (edição 2008)

por Fergus Bordewich (Autor)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
2067101,617 (3.74)3
From the acclaimed author of "Bound for Canaan" comes a major work of American history on the astonishing compromises and alliances involved in making Washington, D.C., the capital of the new nation..
Membro:wwalker4
Título:Washington: The Making of the American Capital
Autores:Fergus Bordewich (Autor)
Informação:Amistad (2008), Edition: 1st Edition, 384 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Pormenores da obra

Washington: The Making of the American Capital por Fergus Bordewich

A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Ver também 3 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 7 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Great Book Makes you think twice abut how our nations capitol was conceived and who is responsible for the greedy dream to be reality ( )
  justdeanna | Sep 10, 2010 |
Bordewich’s narrative about the “making” of Washington DC is quite an engaging read. Evidencing a strong critical demeanor – occasionally bordering on angst – the author covers the agendas and foibles of such figures as L’Enfant, the commissioners, the speculators, and the Founding Fathers as the Potomac deal developed. Also significant is the laudable focus on the central role of African Americans – free and enslaved – in the building of the city. There’s such an emphasis, in fact, that I’m surprised this doesn’t at least inform the book's subtitle. The inclusion of a Benjamin Banneker portrait – Mt Rushmore-like – alongside three of the white dudes that show up on our currency is the only tell-tale sign of Bordewich’s serious presentation of the issues around slavery, Philadelphia’s abolitionist milieu, and the impossibility of DC’s realization without such forced labor.

To balance his focus on this oft-ignored contribution (which, unfortunately must cope with an obvious dearth of archival documentation), Bordewich openly portrays the bumbling incompetence, graft, and/or self-interest that tended to undermine the supposed noble intentions granted to many of the original movers, shakers, and (literally) Big Wigs involved. It’s very entertaining - I could easily imagine our contemporary political elite repeating this near-fiasco today (if only they could figure out how to collect taxes from billionaires).

My only disappointment (as is typical, through not reading the book jacket description) is that – after recently reading a biography about L’Enfant – I had hoped that this book would cover a longer period of Washington’s development. I somehow thought that Bordewich would conclude with Marion Barry’s pipe or something. But alas, the timeline is exactly the same; tons of attention to the first 10 ill-fated years with a quick segue to Grant’s decision to finally fund this damn thing once and for all. Nonetheless, this is certainly a terrific story of our Capital’s origins. ( )
  mjgrogan | Jun 14, 2010 |
If you've ever wondered how and why some very improbable and unwelcoming terrain on the Potomac came to be chosen in 1790 as the site for the nation's capital, this is the book for you.

I approached the reading of this book with a lot of enthusiasm. I was honestly interested in learning more about the capital and how it came to be. I can't say I was disappointed with the information I received. The book is full of interesting pieces of history that paint a sometimes bleak and pessimistic canvas of our nation's founders. I was disappointed to learn some things about some of our founders. I was surprised at other times. But I was never disappointed.

I was, however, slightly disappointed with the narrative itself. It wasn't bad but it also wasn't as engaging as some books I've read (1776 comes to mind). The information was there and the stories were there but I felt like I was working when I read about them. It wasn't an easy read.

Still, though, I do recommend this book to anyone with a real interest in the American Revolutionary period as this book contains a lot of little tidbits you aren't likely to find anywhere else. ( )
  jclark88 | May 28, 2010 |
In this book Fergus M. Bordewich chronicles the early history of the nation's capital of the U.S.A., highlighting the political struggles, sectional rivalry, backroom dealing, and big money that led to the 1790 establishment of Washington, D.C. The author discusses the people involved in the city's construction, including engineer Peter L'Enfant, African American surveyor Benjamin Banneker, and he does write about the slaves who did a majority of the heavy labor. If it was the author's intent to just write about the original choice of placement, the difficulties and corruption that took place to give the U.S.A. the capital they have now he did a good introduction and that is what I rated it on. As to the actual construction and completion of the nation's capital this book is just a look at the beginning with mention of how the completion came to be. It is a shame that the author's polemics could not have been left out of this writing. ( )
  hermit | Mar 21, 2010 |
Bordewich’s narrative about the “making” of Washington DC is quite an engaging read. Evidencing a strong critical demeanor – occasionally bordering on angst – the author covers the agendas and foibles of such figures as L’Enfant, the commissioners, the speculators, and the Founding Fathers as the Potomac deal developed. Also significant is the laudable focus on the central role of African Americans – free and enslaved – in the building of the city. There’s such an emphasis, in fact, that I’m surprised this doesn’t at least inform the book's subtitle. The inclusion of a Benjamin Banneker portrait – Mt Rushmore-like – alongside three of the white dudes that show up on our currency is the only tell-tale sign of Bordewich’s serious presentation of the issues around slavery, Philadelphia’s abolitionist milieu, and the impossibility of DC’s realization without such forced labor.

To balance his focus on this oft-ignored contribution (which, unfortunately must cope with an obvious dearth of archival documentation), Bordewich openly portrays the bumbling incompetence, graft, and/or self-interest that tended to undermine the supposed noble intentions granted to many of the original movers, shakers, and (literally) Big Wigs involved. It’s very entertaining - I could easily imagine our contemporary political elite repeating this near-fiasco today (if only they could figure out how to collect taxes from billionaires).

My only disappointment (as is typical, through not reading the book jacket description) is that – after recently reading a biography about L’Enfant – I had hoped that this book would cover a longer period of Washington’s development. I somehow thought that Bordewich would conclude with Marion Barry’s pipe or something. But alas, the timeline is exactly the same; tons of attention to the first ten ill-fated years with a quick segue to Grant’s decision to finally fund this damn thing once and for all. Nonetheless, this is certainly a terrific story of our Capital’s origins. ( )
  mjgrogan | Aug 25, 2009 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 7 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
sem críticas | adicionar uma crítica
Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Locais importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Acontecimentos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Prémios e menções honrosas
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Citações
Últimas palavras
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Língua original
DDC/MDS canónico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês (3)

From the acclaimed author of "Bound for Canaan" comes a major work of American history on the astonishing compromises and alliances involved in making Washington, D.C., the capital of the new nation..

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Autor LibraryThing

Fergus Bordewich é um Autor LibraryThing, um autor que lista a sua biblioteca pessoal no LibraryThing.

página de perfil | página de autor

Ligações Rápidas

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (3.74)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2
2.5 1
3 6
3.5
4 7
4.5 2
5 4

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 160,412,432 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível