Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquisar O Sítio Web
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

A carregar...

Clear Light of Day (1980)

por Anita Desai

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
7202231,464 (3.56)71
"The novel begins with the triennial visit of the younger sister Tara and her diplomat husband to the old family home, a decaying suburban mansion on the banks of the Jumma outside Old Delhi. Here Bim the older sister, lives with the youngest brother, Baba. Baba is autistic, a childlike, speechless whisp of a man who spends his days playing 'I'm Dreaming of a White Christmas' and 'Donkey seranade' on an ancient wind-up gramophone. The oldest brother, Raja, has moved away. The book divides itself equally between the present of Tara's visit and the sisters' memories of the past ... The visit is a strain -- a series of under-the-surface estrangements and rapprochements, with sisterly care ebbing and flowing." Times Lit Suppl. "This work 'does what only the best novels can do: it totally submerges us. It takes us so deeply into another world that we almost fear we won't be able to climb out again.'" N Y Times Book Rev.… (mais)
Adicionado recentemente porPluttis, boopingaround, DrNaori, Brazgo67, KeithGold, KinghornLibrary, SudhaP, MWise
Bibliotecas LegadasWalker Percy
A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Ver também 71 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 22 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
In questo romanzo si parla di due sorelle e due fratelli cresciuti amorevolmente dalla zia Mira, dato che i genitori, pur vivendo nella stessa casa, sono troppo presi dai loro impegni mondani per poter prestare attenzione ai figli.

Bim, Raja, Tara e Baba sono diversi, ma accomunati fin da bambini dal bisogno di scappare dalla loro situazione familiare di indifferenza e bassezza. E così crescendo hanno preso strade diverse: Bim ha studiato storia e si è resa autosufficiente, Raja è diventato ricco, Tara ha sposato un diplomatico e Baba, ragazzo ritardato, ha trovato nella musica del giradischi la sua evasione.

Tuttavia tra i fratelli e le sorelle non c'è più l'affiatamento di un tempo. Anzi, Bim, rimasta nella casa di famiglia insieme a Baba, nutre del rancore per Raja e Tara. Sì, perché loro sono riusciti ad andarsene fisicamente da quella casa, sempre più grigia e decadente, mentre lei è rimasta lì, prima ad accudire la zia Mira, poi a prendersi cura di Baba.

Bim non riesce a perdonare Raja per essere diventato ricco e Tara per essersene andata. Eppure non ne ha mai parlato con loro e il suo rancore la porta ad isolarsi in una casa che lo scorrere del tempo rende sempre più squallida.

Il romanzo prende inizio da una visita di Tara a Bim, per poi indagare il passato delle due sorelle e dei due fratelli. Alla fine solo la «chiara luce del sole» riuscirà a riportare la serenità nella famiglia e a rivelare la potenza delle speranze della gioventù e la dolorosa consapevolezza dell'età adulta. ( )
  lasiepedimore | Aug 2, 2023 |
International boundaries don't keep out dysfunctional and estranged families. Not that that's news but we do have the fantasy that it must be better somewhere other than here. Desai shows us that's not true. Even in India where family seems much more central than here families can grow apart. What might have worked in an earlier age does not seem to prevent things from spinning out of control. With India there are even more questions. How does their history of control by Britain, their history of Hindu and Muslim clashing, and their overwhelming heat add to the picture. Are they causal or just coincidental? They are all over every aspect of this story and ever present but Desai does not seem to see a connection. Or did I miss something? What Desai never mentions is the caste system but the servants are ever present and definitely looked down on upon from what is apparently a middle class situation. The central character is the sister who in her younger days seemed like the one most likely to take off on her own but now is the one who never leaves. Her brother and sister have fled in different directions but she stays behind to care for the developmentally challenged younger brother. She resents her older brother leaving her behind and her sister who opted, as expected, for her dream of getting married and having kids. Can they all get it together and bury the hatchets. That's the entire story. If you enjoy reading about that this book will show how that can happen even in another culture. Learning about the Indian culture was the part that made this interesting. ( )
  Ed_Schneider | Apr 2, 2023 |
Every three years, Tara and her husband, Bakul, travel to Old Delhi to visit her sister, Bimla, the central character. Tara fondly remembers their shared childhood when everyone got along. Bim has never married. She lives in the old family home, teaching school and caring for her younger brother who has autism. The storyline follows the Das family conflicts and uncovers their sources. Bim is estranged from her other brother. There are lingering jealousies and rivalries between the sisters. In the later parts of the book, the narrative flashes back to the days of Partition, with its civil unrest. Finally, we come back to the present and find Bim reassessing her relationship to her family.

The primary theme relates to changes that occur due to the passage of time. Music, poetry, and arts are referenced throughout. There is not a lot going on in this novel. It is a family story that delves into the details of the characters, and their past and present lives. It explores Partition to a certain degree, but it is not the primary focus of the story. It is slow in developing and beautifully written. It will appeal to those who enjoy reflective stories about family relationships.

“Although it was shadowy and dark, Bim could see as well as by the clear light of day that she felt only love and yearning for them all, and if there were hurts, these gashes and wounds in her side that bled, then it was only because her love was imperfect and did not encompass them thoroughly enough, and because it had flaws and inadequacies and did not extend to all equally.”
( )
  Castlelass | Oct 30, 2022 |
Tara’s visit to her childhood home in Old Delhi triggers memories of the past for both Tara and her older sister, Bim. The sisters’ different personalities different life choices have set them at odds, but by the end of Tara’s visit they will work through their painful memories to find forgiveness, acceptance, and peace.

This novel transcends the genre of domestic fiction in ways that remind me of authors like Jane Austen. The family home in Old Delhi and the family circle are central to the plot. The action travels no farther than next door, except in memory. The social milieu is confined to the small Old Delhi neighborhood. However, the neighborhood was irrevocably changed with India’s partition in 1947, and the effects of change reverberate in the novel’s present. ( )
  cbl_tn | Jul 3, 2022 |
Although this was shortlisted for the Booker Prize, I couldn’t quite see where this was going or the point of it all. I kept expecting things to happen or the narrative to take a coherent form or the characters to develop more and I encountered nothing like this. I came away from it feeling somehow unsatisfied.

That is partly illustrated by the fact that, as I write this post, I’m not entirely sure how to summarise what I’ve read. This is the story of siblings in an Indian family containing episodes both of their childhood but also views of that childhood from their perspectives as adults provoked by the return of one sister from overseas as she visits.

While the lengthy and helpful Wikipedia entry states that this is a post-partition novel, I’d disagree. While the bulk of the narrative takes place post-partition, the foundation for their memories is in fact set prior to the nation’s independence.

This is important and something that I feel isn’t fully explored in the novel. The impending crisis is briefly portrayed in a flashback to India of the late 1940s. Both partition and the assassination of Ghandi are seen through the eyes of the children and the impact it has on their relationships and psychologies.

It’s this that I think Desai could have made much, much more of. It was something that her daughter, Kiran Desai, used very successfully as a vehicle for her powerful Booker-winner The Inheritance of Loss. Head to that and skip this. ( )
  arukiyomi | Dec 27, 2020 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 22 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
sem críticas | adicionar uma crítica
Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Locais importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Acontecimentos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Epígrafe
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Memory is a strange bell--
Jubilee and knell--
Emily Dickinson

See, now they vanish,
The faces and places, with the self which, as
it could, loved them,
To become renewed, transfigured, in another pattern.
T. S. Eliot
Dedicatória
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
For Didi and Pip
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
The koels began to call before daylight.
Citações
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
(Carregue para mostrar. Atenção: Pode conter revelações sobre o enredo.)
Nota de desambiguação
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
This work may share an ISBN with Pet Minders (Jugglers) by Robina Beckles Willson.
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Língua original
DDC/MDS canónico
LCC Canónico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

"The novel begins with the triennial visit of the younger sister Tara and her diplomat husband to the old family home, a decaying suburban mansion on the banks of the Jumma outside Old Delhi. Here Bim the older sister, lives with the youngest brother, Baba. Baba is autistic, a childlike, speechless whisp of a man who spends his days playing 'I'm Dreaming of a White Christmas' and 'Donkey seranade' on an ancient wind-up gramophone. The oldest brother, Raja, has moved away. The book divides itself equally between the present of Tara's visit and the sisters' memories of the past ... The visit is a strain -- a series of under-the-surface estrangements and rapprochements, with sisterly care ebbing and flowing." Times Lit Suppl. "This work 'does what only the best novels can do: it totally submerges us. It takes us so deeply into another world that we almost fear we won't be able to climb out again.'" N Y Times Book Rev.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Current Discussions

Nenhum(a)

Capas populares

Ligações Rápidas

Avaliação

Média: (3.56)
0.5
1 2
1.5
2 7
2.5 5
3 26
3.5 6
4 39
4.5 2
5 12

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 204,382,069 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível