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The Citadel of the Autarch

por Gene Wolfe

Outros autores: Ver a secção outros autores.

Séries: The Book of the New Sun (4), Solar Cycle (4)

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1,1782012,662 (4.13)1 / 34
Severian the Torturer continues his epic journey across the lands of Urth, carrying with him the Claw of the Conciliator and the great sword, Terminus Est. All his travels are leading towards a destiny that he dare not refuse. This is the fourth and last volume in the series.
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Mostrando 1-5 de 20 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
This was a good read, but not a must read for me. I felt it held together a bit better than the previous 3rd volume but I found the ending a little bit of a let down. The entire 4 volumes of the Book of the New Sun really is about the journey rather than the destination. What makes this series of book so pleasurable to read is Wolfe’s prose and the wonderings he poses via Severian’s thought processes. I still don’t understand why Severian was chosen to be Autarch. I still don’t understand why he has unreliable powers of resurrection and healing. I still don’t understand the role of the Undines and the cacogenes (aliens). It feels to me as if humanity is a pawn in a much larger game to which Severian is finally admitted to the table to play at the end of the book. Clearly there is time travel occurring throughout the entire 4 volumes of this book. Is this why humanity stopped travelling to the stars? Because they figured out how to traverse time? So many questions that I still wonder about. Is Severian/The Autarch a good person or simply someone who is carrying out their role in the game? The first two volumes in this series ended up being my favourites because they introduced the world and also seemed to develop relationships to a better extent between Severian and his travelling companions (Shadow of the Torturer; Claw of the Conciliator). In the last two volumes, relationships seem to be tossed aside too wantonly for a variety of reasons but typically because they simply die. So there is little chance to become invested in the characters that Severian meets (Sword of the Lictor; Citadel of the Autarch). Despite these criticisms, I am still very happy I read this book. It is interesting but not fully satisfying. ( )
  Neil_Luvs_Books | Aug 18, 2021 |
The Book of the New Sun series is the best sci-fi I've ever read, and the best fantasy I've ever read. Any discussion of why would be a spoiler. But: in the same way Dark Souls reveals its world, though snatched moments, architecture, and poetry, so too does this book series disclose a yawning vastness. And critically it allows that vastness to yawn like the night sky. ( )
  jtth | Aug 17, 2021 |
This is a 5500 word essay on a reread of the full TBotNS, focusing on the narrative trap Wolfe has set, and my theory that his literary sleight of hand serves a religious/mystical goal, much more than it is the supposed puzzle for the reader to unravel. There’s also a short section on free will, and it ends with my overall appraisal of the book’s enduring appeal.

(...)

Even though Wright might be right in spirit, Aramini’s law still holds: “One of the most fascinating aspects of the critical discourse surrounding Wolfe involves how infrequently any two people will agree with each other.” That is because Wolfe has indeed set a trap – but his trap isn’t there to catch readers unwilling to question their assumptions in a post-structuralist way… The trap is there to catch post-structuralists and puzzle-solvers altogether. To understand that, I’ll have to turn to the Spiritual.

(...)

Full review on Weighing A Pig Doesn't Fatten It ( )
  bormgans | May 17, 2021 |
Read as part of 'Sword and Citadel' omnibus. See 'The Sword of the Lictor' entry for edition information. ( )
  fmc712 | Feb 18, 2021 |
So now that all the big reveals have come through, plus a very nice one to redefine the rest of the series, I can officially say that I *like* this series instead of just sitting around being mystified and weirded out by it while wondering how to justify the traditional action events with the truly odd.

And now I know.

It's pretty awesome, but not quite up to the level of mindfuqery that I was prepared to expect based on all the multiple time-travel and memory-cannibalisms that we've been subjected to. I mean, it's been four whole novels of what appeared to be straightforward adventure before it got super weird, and I'm not even including the humaniform robots, the dying of the sun, the idea-form aliens, living gods or locations jettisoned out of the time-stream. As if those weren't quite enough, right?

Still, one has to be impressed by the almost Dune-like scope near the end, the complete and utter laying out of reveals, the expected solution for the sun, and of course, Severian's Fate. And those inside him, of course. :)

A word to the wise, for anyone contemplating taking on this admittedly daunting work: Read all four books straight through. It won't be as frustrating. Ignore Serverain's epilogue and stick with the tale.

And by all means, have faith that it comes together in the end, because it does.

I'm actually kind of tempted to do them all again to start really connecting the dots instead of just *thinking* that I'm connecting all the dots. :) It's an impressive work, but let me be perfectly honest... it's not the end-all of all SF. It's good, it's very literary in both the regular mainstream and classics as well as the SF field, but it's not quite the grand masterpiece I was led to believe it was.

Being able to incorporate so many other works inside a single adventure, however impressive, technically, is not the same thing as being a wild and fun read.

Although, I *DID* love the occasion for the marriage stories. Those were all pretty well brilliant and fun as hell. :)

I'm glad I made it through. :) ( )
  bradleyhorner | Jun 1, 2020 |
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» Adicionar outros autores (7 possíveis)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Gene Wolfeautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculated
Frick, JohanTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Maitz, DonArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Pennington, BruceArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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Severian the Torturer continues his epic journey across the lands of Urth, carrying with him the Claw of the Conciliator and the great sword, Terminus Est. All his travels are leading towards a destiny that he dare not refuse. This is the fourth and last volume in the series.

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