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Vathek por William Beckford
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Vathek (original 1786; edição 2009)

por William Beckford

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaDiscussões / Menções
1,0924013,581 (3.16)1 / 157
'Woe to the rash mortal who seeks to know that of which he should remain ignorant; and to undertake that which surpasseth his power!'The Caliph Vathek is dissolute and debauched, and hungry for knowledge. When the mysterious Giaour offers him boundless treasure and unrivalled power he is willing to sacrifice his god, the lives of innocent children, and his own soul to satisfy his obsession. Vathek's extraordinary journey to thesubterranean palace of Eblis, and the terrifying fate that there awaits him, is a captivating tale of magic and oriental fantasy, sudden violence and corrupted love, whose mix of moral fable, grotesque comedy, and evocative beauty defies classification. Originally written by Beckford in French atthe age of only 21, its dreamlike qualities have influenced writers from Byron to H. P. Lovecraft.This new edition reprints Beckford's authorized English text of 1816 with its elaborate and entertaining notes. In his new introduction Thomas Keymer examines the novel's relations to a range of literary genres and cultural contexts.… (mais)
Membro:nollpunkt
Título:Vathek
Autores:William Beckford
Informação:Umeå : h:ström - Text & kultur, 2009
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

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Vathek por William Beckford (1786)

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William Beckford wrote "The History of Caliph Vathek" in French in 1784, but it was first published in an English translation by Samuel Henley in 1786. Widely regarded as one of the seminal works of Gothic literature, this strange, unclassifiable novel recounts its eponymous protagonist's quest for esoteric knowledge and carnal pleasure, a quest which ultimately leads to his damnation.

"Vathek" combines exotic descriptions of the Orient with passages of grotesque comedy and a dollop of supernatural derring-do. Indeed, one of the challenges for modern sensibilities (and possibly its original readers as well) is to determine which passages should be taken at face value and which ones are to be read as self-parody. Even allowing for the genre's excesses, episodes such as that of a wizard being turned into a ball and kicked around Vathek's kingdom are clearly intended as black comedy. But what about Vathek's damnation, described in language of poetic intensity? Is the moralistic ending to be taken at face value or is Beckford being ironic? The author's letters suggest the former to be the case - which is rather surprising considering the atmosphere of decadence which permeates the novel.

If read purely for narrative pleasure, Vathek might disappoint. The plot is episodic, there are too many changes of gear, and the novel's ultimate message - if it does have one - is elusive and unclear. Yet, for anybody interested in early Romanticism, Orientalism, supernatural fiction or, for that matter, unusual literary fare, this is a must-read.

The Oxford World Classics text follows the 1816 English language version, prepared by Beckford himself. It includes an informative introduction by Roger Lonsdale which, interestingly, makes the case for *not* considering Vathek a Gothic novel. Also included are the erudite endnotes which Beckford included in the 1816 edition of Vathek (although first-time readers might prefer just reading through it and then consulting the notes on subsequent readings).

https://endsoftheword.blogspot.com/2020/03/William-Beckford-Vathek.html ( )
  JosephCamilleri | Mar 5, 2021 |
> Cette édition de Vathek a le grand mérite de nous restituer ce texte, avec les deux autres épisodes liés à l'histoire du calife : "Histoire de la princesse Zulkaïs et du prince Kalilah", "Histoire du prince Barkiarokh". Didier Girard s'est livré à un travail de détective à partir des manuscrits des épisodes et des diverses versions de Vathek. Il nous propose ici la première version, imprimée à Lausanne en 1786, en donnant sous forme de notes les variantes opérées dans les éditions suivantes - nous avions jusqu'alors la version de 1787 revue et autorisée par Beckford. --Danieljean (Babelio)

> Citations et Extraits (Babelio) : https://www.babelio.com/livres/Beckford-Vathek-Conte-arabe/27960/citations ( )
  Joop-le-philosophe | Feb 20, 2021 |
William Beckford wrote "The History of Caliph Vathek" in French in 1784, but it was first published in an English translation by Samuel Henley in 1786. Widely regarded as one of the seminal works of Gothic literature, this strange, unclassifiable novel recounts its eponymous protagonist's quest for esoteric knowledge and carnal pleasure, a quest which ultimately leads to his damnation.

"Vathek" combines exotic descriptions of the Orient with passages of grotesque comedy and a dollop of supernatural derring-do. Indeed, one of the challenges for modern sensibilities (and possibly its original readers as well) is to determine which passages should be taken at face value and which ones are to be read as self-parody. Even allowing for the genre's excesses, episodes such as that of a wizard being turned into a ball and kicked around Vathek's kingdom are clearly intended as black comedy. But what about Vathek's damnation, described in language of poetic intensity? Is the moralistic ending to be taken at face value or is Beckford being ironic? The author's letters suggest the former to be the case - which is rather surprising considering the atmosphere of decadence which permeates the novel.

If read purely for narrative pleasure, Vathek might disappoint. The plot is episodic, there are too many changes of gear, and the novel's ultimate message - if it does have one - is elusive and unclear. Yet, for anybody interested in early Romanticism, Orientalism, supernatural fiction or, for that matter, unusual literary fare, this is a must-read.

The Oxford World Classics text follows the 1816 English language version, prepared by Beckford himself. It includes an informative introduction by Roger Lonsdale which, interestingly, makes the case for *not* considering Vathek a Gothic novel. Also included are the erudite endnotes which Beckford included in the 1816 edition of Vathek (although first-time readers might prefer just reading through it and then consulting the notes on subsequent readings).

https://endsoftheword.blogspot.com/2020/03/William-Beckford-Vathek.html ( )
  JosephCamilleri | Sep 12, 2020 |
Rating 3.6

Vathek : An Arabian Tale by William Beckford, written when he was just 21 in 1782. It is a combination of a Gothic novel and Orientalism. The 18/19century was noted for an obsession of all things Oriental. Vathek is the 9th Caliph of Abassides and is addicted to the pursuit of pleasures for all his senses. His major sin is gluttony. Carathis is his evil mother who is knowledgeable in science and occult.

Vathek meets up with a Indian merchant called Giaour who is really a Jinn. From that point Vathek engages in all kinds of horrors and eventually goes on a quest of of the throne of Soliman. During this quest he mistreats a host, Emir Fakreddin by taking his daughter Nouronihar. They finally arrive and find that the quest has led them to a place of great loss -- the loss of hope.

A quick read that is strongly influenced by literature such as Paradise Lost and has also influence other works of literature. ( )
  Kristelh | Feb 16, 2020 |
Vathek does a credible job of capturing the Arabian Nights tone and lush descriptive passages, based on my faint recollection. Anything mixing this and the Gothic is liable to turn incredible in places - and it does - testing a reader's patience if it's taken too seriously. But the story is still very determined to take itself seriously, notwithstanding. It barely touches upon comedy, and the drama can take some very dark turns as Vathek seeks out power above and beyond what he already enjoys as caliph. Given that he already has it all, and yet he's still tempted by infernal means of acquiring more, it's practically impossible to find any sympathy for him. His intermittent episodes of remorse are so impromptu and brief, and his chances to recant so many, he can't even be viewed as a victim of irresistible circumstance (or of his mother).

Beckford was writing at the height (circa 1790 to 1800) of the gothic period, while Anne Radcliffe was enjoying her throne as England's pre-eminent author before modern fiction began to take over. Even so, Vathek arguably does not fit completely into the gothic genre. It's more clearly bent towards adopting an Oriental storytelling tradition, which it is said to do remarkably well. It's an oddity among English literature and it continues to stand out today accordingly. Whether it's actually still enjoyable to read without knowing this context is another question given its preposterous plotting, unlikely events and too-plain moral. I had to drag myself through it, but I'd still take this over Radcliffe any day. ( )
1 vote Cecrow | Nov 12, 2019 |
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» Adicionar outros autores (22 possíveis)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
William Beckfordautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculated
Bawden, EdwardIlustradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Benda, WolframTranslator and Afterwordautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Benda, WolframTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Blaine, MahlonIlustradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Blei, FranzÜbersetzerautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Camerino, AldoTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Carter, LinIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Cruz, RayArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Damman, BenjaminEngraver.autor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Elie, PaulIlustradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Emmett, R.J.Introduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Fitz-Gerald, SJ AdairIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Graham, Kenneth W.Editorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Grimsditch, Herbert B.Tradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Håkansson, GabriellaPosfácioautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Helnwein, GottfriedIlustradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Helnwein, GottfriedIlustradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Henley, SamuelTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Isfelt, ArthurTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Lonsdale, RichardEditorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Lonsdale, RogerEditorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Marzials, Frank T.Tradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Moravia, AlbertoPrefácioautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Morley, HenryEditorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
North, WilliamPrefácioautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Paoletti, GiovanniEditorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Pentleton, CarolDesignerautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Pintor, GiaimeTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Redon, OdilonIlustradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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The long and extravagant career of the author of Vathek would surely have impressed Samuel Johnson as a notable and sustained illustration of what his Imlac had called (in his own very different 'oriental' tale) 'that hunger of imagination which preys incessantly upon life'. (Introduction)
Vathek, ninth Caliph of the race of the Abassides, was the son of Motassem, and the grandson of Haroun al Raschid.
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Contains only Vathek. Please do not combine with editions containing The Episodes of Vathek or other works.
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'Woe to the rash mortal who seeks to know that of which he should remain ignorant; and to undertake that which surpasseth his power!'The Caliph Vathek is dissolute and debauched, and hungry for knowledge. When the mysterious Giaour offers him boundless treasure and unrivalled power he is willing to sacrifice his god, the lives of innocent children, and his own soul to satisfy his obsession. Vathek's extraordinary journey to thesubterranean palace of Eblis, and the terrifying fate that there awaits him, is a captivating tale of magic and oriental fantasy, sudden violence and corrupted love, whose mix of moral fable, grotesque comedy, and evocative beauty defies classification. Originally written by Beckford in French atthe age of only 21, its dreamlike qualities have influenced writers from Byron to H. P. Lovecraft.This new edition reprints Beckford's authorized English text of 1816 with its elaborate and entertaining notes. In his new introduction Thomas Keymer examines the novel's relations to a range of literary genres and cultural contexts.

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