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Medea por Christa Wolf
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Medea (edição 1998)

por Christa Wolf (Autor)

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381849,803 (3.81)17
Medea is among the most notorious women in the canon of Greek tragedy: a woman scorned who sacrifices her own children to her jealous rage. In her gripping new novel, Christa Wolf expands this myth, revealing a fiercely independent woman ensnared in a brutal political battle. Medea, driven by her conscience to leave her corrupt homeland, arrives in Corinth with her husband, the hero Jason. He is welcomed, but she is branded the outsider--and then she discovers the appalling secret behind the king's claim to power. Unwilling to ignore the horrifying truth about the state, she becomes a threat to the king and his ruthless advisors. Then abandoned by Jason and made a public scapegoat, she is reviled as a witch and a murderess. Long a sharp-eyed political observer, Christa Wolf transforms this ancient tale into a startlingly relevant commentary on our times. Possessed of the enduring truths so treasured in the classics, and yet with a thoroughly contemporary spin, her Medea is a stunningly perceptive and probingly honest work of fiction.… (mais)
Membro:cymbidium
Título:Medea
Autores:Christa Wolf (Autor)
Informação:Nan A. Talese (1998), Edition: First Trade Paperback Edition, 208 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
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Medea por Christa Wolf

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’I am Medea, the sorceress, if you all will have it so. The wild woman, the foreigner. You shall not belittle me.’’

I’ve always declared-to the dismay of many- that if I ever had a daughter, I would name her Medea. My fascination with this larger-than-life woman has been undiminished ever since I started learning about the ancient, endless, eternal myths of my country from a relatively young age. Call me ‘’weird’’ but dark, controversial figures have accompanied me for the most part of my reading life. It also helped that my mother had the knowledge and the patience to explain to me how myths were made in a society of men, by men and for men. World Culture is loaded with mythical women who have been vilified as an excuse for the stupidity, disloyalty and absolute lack of courage on men’s part. Eve, Medea, Helen of Troy, Pandora, Circe, Phaedra, Jocasta...The list goes on and on….A woman can either be a whore or a saint. Too bad for the ‘’willing’’ ones because the first team makes for the best of stories. In this extraordinary moment in European Literature, Christa Wolf reimagines Medea’s story, focusing on her last days in Corinth and culminating with the death of her sons. The result is a haunting, raw elegy of broken promises and thwarted dreams….

’They’ve made what they need out of each of us. Out of you, the Hero, and out of me, the Wicked Witch. They’ve driven us apart like that.’’

People create myths to explain passions, hopes, wishes and inclinations. They need the heroes, the ones who battle against gods and men, as they need the scapegoats responsible when the hero goes astray. What happens when the Hero succeeds only after the Scapegoat has provided the necessary help? Well, noone cares about this tiny detail, all that matters is that the job is done. However, when everything crumbles because of disloyalty and ambition, it’s time for the Scapegoat to be driven out. Medea is either a healer or a bringer of curse. This is what the mob, the ever-changing, witless crowd believes. She is the Other, the Foreigner, the one who threatens the established order with her powers and invocations. Jason is blaming his obsession and lust to Medea, always unwilling to admit what a phony ‘’hero’’ he is. He doesn’t care anymore, the glory is his and it’s time to find a younger, docile wife who would worship him without questions and thoughts of her own…

‘’Is it a comfort to think that people everywhere fall short of the agreements they have made?’’

I feel that this quote expresses the essence of our times extremely accurately. In the outstanding introduction, Margaret Atwood refers to the political and social background and the status quo that shaped Wolf’s work. Coming from the troubled land of former East Germany, it is clear that her political and social views influenced her writing. How could it have been otherwise? Medea was written in 1996, six years after the reunification of Germany, and while reading, one can feel a deep sense of bitterness and intense distrust towards the institution of the state and the authorities. Knowing the political context, Medea becomes much more than a retelling of an ancient legend.

The writing and the characterization are unique. The portrait of Medea is moving, sad, haunting...There are quite a few exceptional descriptions of the city of Corinth and the nightly scenes are eerie, foreboding. Don’t expect any infanticides, gore, violence or sex and the end will surprise you. I will not compare Wolf’s work to Euripides or Seneca. Each one is a different beast, all masterpieces in their own right. However, I know which one I prefer. Wolf’s esoteric, haunting, solemn cry for the truth and for a world that turned out quite different than promised. For the innocent victims of the frustrations of the mighty, the demonization of the weakest links.

‘’Up there in the dark, night-blue sky, like a slightly tilted silver of peel, the crescent moon was still swimming, though on the wane, reminding me of my waning years, my Colchian moon, endowed with the power to pull the sun up over the edge of the earth every morning.’’ ( )
  AmaliaGavea | Jul 15, 2018 |
Excellent take on the Medea myth/legend. The people were all believable and there was plenty to think about for modern times as well. My biggest complaint was that Medea (and the rest of the Colchean people?) was described as being black ("dark brown skin", "crinkly" curly hair) which strikes me as odd since she came from what is now part of northern Turkey. ( )
1 vote leslie.98 | Apr 22, 2014 |
Ein fragwürdiger Versuch, Medea zu rehabilitieren. Wolfs Medea ist keine Mörderin, sondern eine mißverstandene unschuldige Ausländerin, die Opfer politischer Intriguen wird. Die Geschichte wird – im Vergleich zu Wolfs früheren Kassandra Projekt – aus der Perspektive mehrere Agierenden im Geschehen (Jason, Kreon, Glauke) erzählt. Leider, so mein Eindruck, entsteht dadurch keine Stimmenvielfalt, weil alle Erzähler ihre – Medeas – Darstellung der Ereignisse bestätigen. Medea wird als Sündenbock gebraucht.

Diese Deutung der Geschichte stört aus mehrere Gründen. Erstens weil Wolf teilweise den Anspruch zu erheben scheint, dass ihre Version die ‚wahre‘ ursprüngliche Geschichte ist und dass Schriftsteller einer patriarchalischen Gesellschaft Medea bloß zu Mörderin gemacht haben. Weit interessanter hätte ich eine Erzählung gefunden, die die ideologischen Hintergründe der Geschichte kritisiert oder in Frage stellt, ohne die Tatsachen der Geschichte selbst verändern zu müssen. Dadurch wäre auch ein Dialog mit der Quellen entstanden, die hier nicht möglich ist, weil Wolf ihre Gültigkeit nicht anerkennt.

Wolf verkennt die Faszination dieser Figur, indem sie Medea freisprechen will. Medea fasziniert, weil sie eine komplexe Figur ist, die dazu fähig ist, eine grausame Rache durchzuführen, ohne dass sie dabei ihre Menschlichkeit und Anspruch auf unser Mitleid verliert. Wir müssen Medeas Handlungen nicht gutheissen, um die Zwickmühle zu verstehen, in der sie steckt. Wolfs Erzählung verdrängt diese Komplexität, den Zwiespalt unserer Gefühle. Auch deswegen überzeugt sie nicht.

Letztens stört auch der Verdacht, das Wolf durch diesen mythischen Stoff eigentlich die neuere Vergangenheit abarbeitet. Man kann (und es wird auch häufig getan) im Roman Analogien zur ehemaligen DDR und der Bundesrepublik sehen. Angesichts der Stasi-Vergangenheit erscheint es problematisch, dass es Wolf offensichtlich so viel an die Rechtfertigung ihrer Protagonistin liegt. Nein, ihre Medea hat nichts getan. Nicht in Kolchis, nicht in Korinth. Die Fremde aus dem Osten wird von Anderen verleumdet, die ihre eigene Schuld verheimlichen wollen. Auch in dieser Hinsicht wäre eine differenziertere Untersuchung der Schuldfrage wünschenswert: kein unschuldiges Opfer, sondern eine Frau, die ihre Fehler – und ja, auch ihre Verbrechen – zugibt und Rechenschaft ablegt.

Ein Kritiker hat von den „verpassten Chancen“ des Romans gesprochen. Diesem Urteil kann ich nur zustimmen. Der Roman hätte eine interessante und vielseitige kritische Interpretation eines alten Stoffes sein können, hat aber meines Erachtens den Ziel verfehlt, weil Wolf zu viel in ihrem ideologischen Programm verhaftet bleibt.
1 vote spiphany | Sep 7, 2011 |
Aus der Amazon.de-Redaktion
Den Medeastoff des Euripides hat Christa Wolf eigenwillig und gekonnt verändert. Medea wird reingewaschen: zuviel will ich nicht verraten. Nachdem sie von Jason verstoßen wurde, wird sie gar zu einer antiken, Pestkranke pflegenden Mutter Teresa. Das Verfahren, die Hauptpersonen in einem inneren Dialog die Handlung erzählen zu lassen, ist keinesfalls neu, scheint sogar recht modisch zu sein (Margaret Atwood Alias Grace). Der psychologische Vorteil dieses Verfahrens wird mit weniger Lebendigkeit bezahlt. Trotzdem ist Medea flott zu lesen. Die Handlung wird zwar nicht streng chronologisch entwickelt, macht aber auch keine verständnishemmenden Sprünge. Die Veränderungen benutzt Christa Wolf um zu zeigen, daß Fremdenfeindlichkeit, mangelnde Zivilcourage und Herabsetzung des Fremden schon seit der Antike unbewältigte Probleme vieler Kulturen sind. Der Kampf um die Thronfolge bei den Kolchern, noch ausgeprägter bei den Korinthern wäre einem Shakespeare-Drama angemessen. Die lesenden Männern werden bei der Zauberin Kirke, bekannt aus -- nein, nicht aus dem Fernsehen -- sondern der Odyssee, aufhorchen. Verwandelt Kirke doch glatt Männer in Schweine. Womit zumindest bewiesen ist, daß nicht alle Männer Schweine sind. Wie könnte sonst Kirke ihre Kunst beweisen? Medea von Christa Wolf ist spannend, ideenreich und lesenswert. ( )
Esta crítica foi assinalada por vários utilizadores como um abuso dos termos do serviço. Por isso, não é mostrada (mostrar).
  hbwiesbaden | Jan 25, 2011 |
Het verhaal van Medea, verteld door haarzelf en de mensen om haar heen. Dit boek zet Medea neer als een zelfbewuste vrouw die in het vreemde Korinthe waar men niet gewend is aan zulke vrouwen, uiteindelijk de zondebok wordt. Over haar gaan praatjes de ronde doen, op basis waarvan de Medea die we kennen uit de Griekse drama's wordt geformeerd. Intriges en manipulaties zijn van alle tijden (het boek is geschreven vlak na de Wende).
  wannabook08 | Aug 8, 2009 |
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Medea is among the most notorious women in the canon of Greek tragedy: a woman scorned who sacrifices her own children to her jealous rage. In her gripping new novel, Christa Wolf expands this myth, revealing a fiercely independent woman ensnared in a brutal political battle. Medea, driven by her conscience to leave her corrupt homeland, arrives in Corinth with her husband, the hero Jason. He is welcomed, but she is branded the outsider--and then she discovers the appalling secret behind the king's claim to power. Unwilling to ignore the horrifying truth about the state, she becomes a threat to the king and his ruthless advisors. Then abandoned by Jason and made a public scapegoat, she is reviled as a witch and a murderess. Long a sharp-eyed political observer, Christa Wolf transforms this ancient tale into a startlingly relevant commentary on our times. Possessed of the enduring truths so treasured in the classics, and yet with a thoroughly contemporary spin, her Medea is a stunningly perceptive and probingly honest work of fiction.

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