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The Diary of Samuel Pepys {1661} (1970)

por Samuel Pepys

Outros autores: Ver a secção outros autores.

Séries: The Diary of Samuel Pepys - Latham and Matthews (Volume 02)

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The second volume of the complete Diary of Samuel Pepys in its most authoritative and acclaimed edition. This complete edition of the Diary of Samuel Pepys comprises eleven volumes - nine volumes of text and footnotes (with an introduction of 120 pages in Volume I), a tenth volume of commentary (The Companion) and an eleventh volume of Index. Each of the first eight volumes contains one whole calendar year of the diary, from January to December. The ninth volume runs from January 1668 to May 1669. The Diary was first published in abbreviated form in 1825. A succession of new editions, re-issues and selections, published in the Victorian era, made the Diary one of the best-known books, and Pepys one of the best-known figures, of English history. But in none of these versions - not even in the Wheatley, which for long stood as the standard edition - was there a reliable, still less a full text, and in none of them was there a commentary with any claim to completeness. This edition was in preparation for many years, and remains the first in which the entire Diary is printed and in which an attempt has been made at systematic comment on it. The primary aim of the principal editors was to see that the Diary was presented in a manner suitable to the historical and literary importance of its contents. At the same time they had in mind the interests of the wide public of English-speaking people to whom the diarist himself, rather than the importance of what he wrote, is what matters.… (mais)
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Still impressed by the second volume in the series...

Pepys does not like the French
10 JANUARY. (...) So to Mrs. Hunts, where I find a Frenchman, a lodger of hers, at dinner; and just as I came in was kissing my wife, which I did not like, though there could not be any hurt in it. (...)

A still enigmatic passage about a she-monkey, unless he refers to Elizabeth?
18 JANUARY. (...) At home found all well, but the Monkey loose, which did anger me; and so I did strike her till she was almost dead, that they might make her faste again. (...)

Pepys likes to be spat at by nice women
28 JANUARY. (...) And here, I sitting, behind in a dark place, a lady spat backward upon me by a mistake, not seeing me. But after seeing her to be a very pretty lady, I was not troubled at it at all. (...)

My Lord of Norwich has fun in making cry a 3-year-old prince
3 FEBRUARY. (...) Among other discourse, I observed one story, how my Lord of Norwich at a public audience before the King of France made the Duke of Anjou cry by making ugly faces as he was stepping to the King, but undiscovered. (...)

Luellin makes Pepys dream
25 FEBRUARY. (...) He told me one of the prettiest stories; how Mr. Blurton, his friend that was with him at my house three or four days ago, did go with him the same day from my house to the Fleece taverne by Guild hall, and there (by some pretence) got the mistress of the house, a very pretty woman, into their company. And by the by, Luellin calling him Doctor, she thought that he really was so, and did privately discover her disease to him — which was only some ordinary infirmity belonging to women. And he proffering her physic — she desired him to come some day and bring it, which he did; and withal hath the sight of her thing, and did handle it — and he swears the next time that he will do more. (...)

Pepys likes pretty little girls
11 APRIL. (...) By and by we came to two little girls keeping cowes; and I saw one of them very pretty, so I had a minde to make her aske my blessing. And telling that I was her godfather, she asked me innocently whether I was not Ned Wooding, and I said that I was; so she kneeled down and very simply cried, "Pray, godfather, pray to God to bless me" — which made us very merry and I gave her twopence. (...)

Pepys has a funny way to treat a cold
14 JUNE. (...) I was in great pain and so went home by coach to bed, and went not to the office at all. And by keeping myself warme, I broke wind and so came to some ease. (...)

Pepys has mixed feelings
6 JULY. Waked this morning with news, brought me by a messenger on purpose, that my Uncle Robert is dead — and died yesterday. So I rose, sorry in some respect; glad in my expectations in another respect. (...)

Pepys is tender-hearted
5 AUGUST. (...) But was fain to stay a great while at Stanston because of the rayne; and there borrowed a coat of a man for 6d., and so he rode all the way, poor man, without any. (...)

An extremely captious grave-digger
11 SEPTEMBER. (...) And did show me how a dog that he hath doth kill all the Cattes that come thither to kill his pigeons, and doth afterwards bury them. And doth it with so much care that they shall be quite covered, that if but the tip of the tail hangs out, he will take up the cat again and dig the hole deeper — which is very strange. And he tells me he doth believe that he hath killed above 100 cats. (...)

Pepys dislikes the French
30 SEPTEMBER. (...) And endeed, we do naturally all love the Spanish and hate the French. (...) So when I went to the French house, where I observe still that there is no men in the world of a more insolent spirit where they do well or before they begin a matter, and more abject if they do miscarry, then these people are. (...)

Pepys has funny dreams
3 DECEMBER. (...) And then I dreamt that I had one of my testicles swelled, and in such pain that I waked with it; and had a great deal of pain there a very great while, till I fell asleep again; and such apprehensions I had of it that when I rose and trussed up myself, thinking that it had been no dream — till in the daytime I found myself very well at ease and remembered that I did dream so; and did dream that Mr. Creed was with me and that I did complain to him of it, and he said he had the same pain in his left which I had in my right stone — which pleased me much to remember.

Pepys does not like to squander his money
30 DECEMBER. (...) and I stayed at the Miter, wither I had invited all my old acquaintance of the Exchequer to a good Chine of beef — which with three barrels of oysters and three pullets and plenty of wine and mirth, was our dinner. (...) and here I made them a foolish promise to give them one this day twelvemonth, and so for ever while I live. But I do not entend it. (...) ( )
2 vote Pepys | Apr 30, 2008 |
Pepys kept detailed accounts of his life - from the high court governmental circles to which he had access by virtue of his position to the low and common husband at home with his wife and their servant. His high, important connections make interesting reading as glimpses into the human and personal workings of history. But for me, the most interesting parts are the everyday details, the minutiae of daily life. The technology and specific tools change, but human nature - its needs, wants, hopes, and dreams are persistent. ( )
  AlexTheHunn | Oct 5, 2007 |
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Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Samuel Pepysautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculated
Bright, MynorsEditorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Latham, RobertEditorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Matthews, WilliamEditorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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22 July. Up by three, and going by four on my way to London; but the day proves very cold, so that having put on no stockings but thread ones under my boots, I was fain at Bigglesworth to buy a pair of coarse woollen ones, and put them on. So by degrees till I come to Hatfield before twelve o’clock, where I had a very good dinner with my hostess, at my Lord of Salisbury’s Inn, and after dinner though weary I walked all alone to the Vineyard, which is now a very beautiful place again; and coming back I met with Mr. Looker, my Lord’s gardener (a friend of Mr. Eglin’s), who showed me the house, the chappell with brave pictures, and, above all, the gardens, such as I never saw in all my life; nor so good flowers, nor so great gooseberrys, as big as nutmegs.
I sitting [in the theatre] behind in a dark place, a lady spat backward upon me by a mistake, not seeing me. But after seeing her to be a very pretty lady, I was not troubled at it at all.
This is now 28 years that I am born. And blessed be God, and a state of full content and great hopes to be a happy man in all respects, both to myself and friends.
So that what with this and the badness of the drink and the ill opinion I have of the meat, and the biting of the gnatts by night - and my disappointment in getting home this week - and the trouble or sorting all the papers, I am almost out of my wits with trouble. Only, I appear the more contented, because I would not have my father troubled.
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The second volume of the complete Diary of Samuel Pepys in its most authoritative and acclaimed edition. This complete edition of the Diary of Samuel Pepys comprises eleven volumes - nine volumes of text and footnotes (with an introduction of 120 pages in Volume I), a tenth volume of commentary (The Companion) and an eleventh volume of Index. Each of the first eight volumes contains one whole calendar year of the diary, from January to December. The ninth volume runs from January 1668 to May 1669. The Diary was first published in abbreviated form in 1825. A succession of new editions, re-issues and selections, published in the Victorian era, made the Diary one of the best-known books, and Pepys one of the best-known figures, of English history. But in none of these versions - not even in the Wheatley, which for long stood as the standard edition - was there a reliable, still less a full text, and in none of them was there a commentary with any claim to completeness. This edition was in preparation for many years, and remains the first in which the entire Diary is printed and in which an attempt has been made at systematic comment on it. The primary aim of the principal editors was to see that the Diary was presented in a manner suitable to the historical and literary importance of its contents. At the same time they had in mind the interests of the wide public of English-speaking people to whom the diarist himself, rather than the importance of what he wrote, is what matters.

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