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The 13th Warrior (Previously Published as…
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The 13th Warrior (Previously Published as Eaters of the Dead ) (original 1976; edição 1988)

por Michael Crichton

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
4,433681,991 (3.52)87
It is 922 A.D. The refined Arab courtier Ibn Fadlan is accompanying a party of Viking warriors back to the north. Fadlan belatedly discovers that his job is to combat the terrors in the night that come to slaughter the Vikings--but just how he will do it, Fadlan has no idea.
Membro:JonTheTerrible
Título:The 13th Warrior (Previously Published as Eaters of the Dead )
Autores:Michael Crichton
Informação:Ballantine Books (1988), Edition: 1st, Mass Market Paperback, 288 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:****
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Pormenores da obra

Eaters of the Dead por Michael Crichton (1976)

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A fictitious account by an Arab traveller with Viking warriors and their encounter with Neanderthal man, as told in the ancient tale Beowulf. Quite an imaginative leap into what could have been the Viking mind and way of life, this is the core of the book, which only gets into the battle with the Neanderthals in the final chapters. ( )
  Matt_B | Sep 26, 2021 |
*Originally published as "Eaters of the Dead"*

As a fan of Crichton from high school, this wasn't disappointing at all. A quick-paced action story with Norse undertones and a few dark twisty turns, a reader can find themselves immersed in the story quickly.

This novel follows the setup of the Old English alliterative verse poem of Beowulf. The poem, a 3,200 line oral epic, recounts the story in the land of Zealand where Hrothgar has built himself a great hall but which is abandoned because of murderous rampages that are killing all who live within. In this book, the Wendol are responsible for the raids and destruction. The Chronicler, in the movie played by Antonio Banderas, tells the tale of brave Beowulf and his warriors who come to destroy the Wendol and save Zealand. The character of the Chronicler - Ahmed ibn Fahdlan - was an actual historian who visited the Volga Vikings and wrote about his experiences.

The story is deliberately dark and ambiguous in several areas; the Wendol are not fully described until Buliwyf (the spelling used in the book and movie) and his men seek them out directly after losing several of their party in a raid. The ambiguity Crichton uses sets the reader up for the battles to come and the ultimate end of the story itself.

Each character has specific characteristics meant to call them out, and in his history, Fadhlan provides similar descriptions of the Vikings he met on his journey.

Aside from the historic nature of the book adaptation, Crichton provides his key storytelling abilities and transports the reader through gory yet simple prose into the scenes making them more exciting as the novel goes on.

Recommended for readers in the older end of the YA age range and beyond. The movie is available on certain streaming platforms still and stars Antonio Banderas and Omar Sharif.

*All thoughts and opinions are my own.* ( )
  The_Literary_Jedi | Aug 31, 2021 |
Michael Crichton’s Eaters of the Dead: The Manuscript of Ibn Fadlan Relating His Experiences with the Northmen in AD 922 purports to translate an historic account from a Muslim emissary who’s driven off-track on his ambassadorial mission and joins a Viking quest. The story loosely follows Beowulf, though Crichton changes just enough details to craft a plot that would serve as the “historical” inspiration for the 10th- to 11th-century Old English epic poem. Though Ibn Fadlan never addresses them as such, the “monsters” the Vikings encounter are a band of Neanderthals that have survived past the last Ice Age, raiding the local Norse on occasion and becoming the inspiration for Grendel with their method of carrying torches resembling a dragon in the mist. The work handily demonstrates Crichton’s ability to adopt whatever style he needs to immerse the reader in his narrative while creating a sense of verisimilitude. He succeeds to the point that those unfamiliar with the premise could mistake it for an academic translation, though Crichton ensures that the narrative will entertain. It particularly works well for those familiar with Beowulf. ( )
  DarthDeverell | Aug 18, 2021 |
This review is written with a GPL 4.0 license and the rights contained therein shall supersede all TOS by any and all websites in regards to copying and sharing without proper authorization and permissions. Crossposted at WordPress, Blogspot, & Librarything by Bookstooge’s Exalted Permission

Title: Eaters of the Dead
Series: ----------
Author: Michael Crichton
Rating: 2.5 of 5 Stars
Genre: Historical Fiction
Pages: 167
Words: 54K

Synopsis:

From Wikipedia

The novel is set in the 10th century. The Caliph of Baghdad, Al-Muqtadir, sends his ambassador, Ahmad ibn Fadlan, on a mission to assist the king of the Volga Bulgars. Ahmad ibn Fadlan never arrives, as he is conscripted by a group of Vikings to take part in a hero's quest to the north; he is taken along as the thirteenth member of their group to comply with a soothsayer's requirement for success. In the north, the group battles with the 'mist-monsters', or 'wendol', a tribe of vicious savages (suggested by the narrator to have been possibly relict Neanderthals) who go to battle wearing bear skins.

Eaters of the Dead is narrated as a scientific commentary on an old manuscript. The narrator describes the story as a composite of extant commentaries and translations of the original story teller's manuscript. The narration makes several references to a possible change or mistranslation of the original story by later copiers. The story is told by several different voices: the editor/narrator, the translators of the script, and the original author, Ahmad ibn Fadlan, who also relates stories told by others. A sense of authenticity is supported by occasional explanatory footnotes with references to a mixture of factual and fictitious sources.

My Thoughts:

Earlier this year Dave reviewed this book and it caught my interest. I'd watched, and enjoyed the movie that was produced based on this book: The 13th Warrior. I'd seen this book on my libraries shelf ever since I was a tween but the title really turned me off. In all honesty, it still does. Without Dave's review I never would have mustered up enough interest to dive into this.

Sadly, the book isn't nearly as interesting as the movie and is filled with pointless and fake footnotes. This purports to be a historical document and as such is one of those “Historical Fiction” books where the author makes up wholesale yards of crap to further his story but will insert real historical bits and bobs as well. This has all the historicity of Shakespeare's Henry V.

I was bored for most of this. It wasn't exciting, fast paced or very interesting. While not nearly so boring as the Andromeda Strain (I read that back in 2001 but have not yet gotten the review into it's own post) there were several times that I looked down at the percentage bar on my kindle to see how much I had left. That really isn't a good sign.

On the bright side, I will end up watching the 13th Warrior sometime this year because of this and can expound on how the movie is a much better product than the book. Thinking about it, that seems to be the case for MANY of Crichton's books. Feth, even Congo was a better movie than the book!

★★✬☆☆ ( )
  BookstoogeLT | Jun 23, 2021 |
This book uses the conceit of being an annotated translation of an ancient manuscript to tell the story and it really really suits Crichton's info dump style of showing off how much research he did into his subject. Because his interesting factoids can be inserted as notes from the translator, he doesn't have to try to shoehorn them into dialogue or a character's inner monologue, making them a more seamless part of the story (and skippable if you aren't interested). ( )
  Jthierer | Sep 30, 2020 |
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Michael Crichtonautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculated
Miller, IanIlustradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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"Praise not the day until evening has come; a woman until she is burnt; a sword until it is tried; a maiden until she is married; ice until it has been crossed; beer until it has been drunk."
- Viking Proverb
"Evil is of old date."
- Arab Proverb
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To William Howells
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The Ibn Fadlan manuscript represents the earliest known eyewitness account of Viking life and society.
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(Carregue para mostrar. Atenção: Pode conter revelações sobre o enredo.)
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Later reissued as The 13th Warrior
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It is 922 A.D. The refined Arab courtier Ibn Fadlan is accompanying a party of Viking warriors back to the north. Fadlan belatedly discovers that his job is to combat the terrors in the night that come to slaughter the Vikings--but just how he will do it, Fadlan has no idea.

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