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The Vicar of Wakefield (1766)

por Oliver Goldsmith

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The simple village vicar, Mr. Primrose, is living with his wife and six children in complete tranquility until unexpected calamities force them to weather one hilarious adventure after another.
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» Ver também 172 menções

Inglês (48)  Francês (1)  Catalão (1)  Todas as línguas (50)
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  Murtra | May 10, 2021 |
From Wikipedia; subtitled A Tale, Supposed to be written by Himself – is a novel by Irish writer Oliver Goldsmith (1728–1774). It was written from 1761 to 1762 and published in 1766. It was one of the most popular and widely read 18th-century novels among Victorians. I thought I had read this, but so long ago I could not even begin to tell you what it might be about, so I put it on my tbr takedown list for 2021 and now that I've read it, I still can't say whether I read it before. It is a tale written by (supposedly) the vicar himself that relates his idyllic life as vicar, his family, and the mishaps they experience. The history of how it come to be published (to pay rent) is interesting indeed. It was sold to Francis Newberry (relative of John Newberry) and went unpublished until 1766. STructure includes some poetry, some sermons, and fables. It is a fictitious memoir as it is supposedly written by the vicar himself. The novel supports the basic goodness of man and also a satire on the sentimental novel. There is similarity to Job's difficulties in the book of Job (Holy Bible). The novel is mentioned in George Eliot's Middlemarch, Stendhal's The Life of Henry Brulard, Arthur Schopenhauer's "The Art of Being Right", Jane Austen's Emma, Charles Dickens' A Tale of Two Cities and David Copperfield, Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, Sarah Grand's The Heavenly Twins, Charlotte Brontë's The Professor and Villette, Louisa May Alcott's Little Women and in Johann Wolfgang von Goethe's The Sorrows of Young Werther, as well as his Dichtung und Wahrheit. It is on several lists including; 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die and The Guardian's 1001 Novel's Everyone Must Read, ( )
  Kristelh | Apr 3, 2021 |
An 18th-century comic/sentimental novel about a prosperous vicar and his family who finds themselves in reduced circumstances.

The book starts off slowly, establishing the situation, characters, and details which will become important later. The middle chapters of the book present a gentle satire of rural society of the period. Towards the end, the story takes on a more melodramatic tone as the vicar and his family encounter a series of increasingly serious misfortunes.

I found the book to be a pleasant mix of satire and sentiment. Recommended as light reading for those who enjoy English literature. ( )
1 vote gcthomas | Mar 24, 2021 |
The Vicar – Dr. Charles Primrose – lives an idyllic life in a country parish with his wife Deborah, son George, daughters Olivia and Sophia, and three other children. He is wealthy due to investing an inheritance he received from a deceased relative, and he donates the £35 that his job pays annually to local orphans and war veterans. On the evening of George's wedding to wealthy Arabella Wilmot, the Vicar loses all his money through the bankruptcy of his merchant investor who has left town abruptly.

The wedding is called off by Arabella's father, who is known for his prudence with money. George, who was educated at Oxford and is old enough to be considered an adult, is sent away to town. The rest of the family move to a new and more humble parish on the land of Squire Thornhill, who is known to be a womanizer. On the way, they hear about the dubious reputation of their new landlord. Also, references are made to the squire's uncle Sir William Thornhill, who is known throughout the country for his worthiness and generosity.

A poor and eccentric friend, Mr. Burchell, whom they meet at an inn, rescues Sophia from drowning. She is instantly attracted to him, but her ambitious mother does not encourage her feelings.

Then follows a period of happy family life, interrupted only by regular visits of the dashing Squire Thornhill and Mr. Burchell. Olivia is captivated by Thornhill's hollow charm; but he also encourages the social ambitions of Mrs. Primrose and her daughters to a ludicrous degree.

Finally, Olivia is reported to have fled. First Burchell is suspected, but after a long pursuit Dr. Primrose finds his daughter, who was in fact deceived by Squire Thornhill. He planned to marry her in a mock ceremony and leave her then shortly after, as he had done with several women before.

When Olivia and her father return home, they find their house in flames. Although the family has lost almost all their belongings, the evil Squire Thornhill insists on the payment of the rent. As the vicar cannot pay, he is brought to prison.

A series of dreadful developments follows. The vicar's daughter, Olivia, is reported dead, Sophia is abducted, and George too is sent to prison in chains and covered with blood, as he had challenged Thornhill to a duel when he had heard about his wickedness.

It was one of the most popular and widely read 18th-century novels among Victorians. ( )
  Marcos_Augusto | Feb 24, 2021 |
I am torn about this one - yes, it is a classic, and I have the feeling that without it, Austen would not have been possible (at least not the way we know her). But the characters appear uneven (well, there is really only one character, everyone else is pretty one-dimensional), and while there are nuggets of social commentary, one also has to wonder how that character can get to that particular realization.
So, is it just an overwritten Job version or do we see some real development? I think the first. ( )
  WiebkeK | Jan 21, 2021 |
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Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Goldsmith, Oliverautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Emslie, MacDonaldautor principalalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Anhava, TuomasTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Farrell, NicholasNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Julia R. PigginEditorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Rowlandson, ThomasIlustradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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Sperate miseri, cavete faelices

[Hope, ye wretched, beware, ye prosperous]
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I was ever of opinion that the honest man, who married and brought up a large family, did more service than he who continued single, and only talked of population.
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The jewels of truth have been so imported by others, that nothing was left for me to import but some splendid things that, at a distance, looked every bit as well.
That virtue which requires to be ever guarded is scarce worth the sentinel.
However, when any one of our relations was found to be a person of very bad character, a troublesome guest, or one we desired to get rid of, upon his leaving my house, I ever took care to lend him a riding coat, or a pair of boots, or sometimes a horse of small value, and I always had the satisfaction of finding he never came back to return them.
The pain which conscience gives the man who has already done wrong is soon got over. Conscience is a coward; and those faults it has not strength enough to prevent, it seldom has justice enough to accuse.
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The simple village vicar, Mr. Primrose, is living with his wife and six children in complete tranquility until unexpected calamities force them to weather one hilarious adventure after another.

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