Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquisar O Sítio Web
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

Memories of the Future (New York Review…
A carregar...

Memories of the Future (New York Review Books Classics) (original 2009; edição 2009)

por Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky (Autor)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
4221346,451 (3.83)19
"Written in Soviet Moscow in the 1920s but considered too subversive even to show to a publisher the seven tales included here attest to Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky's boundless imagination, black humor, and breathtaking irony- a man loses his way in the vast black waste of his own small room; the Eiffel Tower runs amok; a kind soul dreams of selling everything you need for suicide ; an absentminded passenger boards the wrong train, winding up in a place where night is day, nightmares are the reality, and the backs of all facts have been broken; a man out looking for work comes across a line for logic but doesn't join it as there's no guarantee the logic will last; a sociable corpse misses his own funeral; an inventor gets a glimpse of the far-from-radiant communist future."… (mais)
Membro:leanna-cw
Título:Memories of the Future (New York Review Books Classics)
Autores:Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky (Autor)
Informação:NYRB Classics (2009), Edition: First Edition, 256 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Pormenores da obra

Memories of the Future por Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky (2009)

Adicionado recentemente porkelmeister, Gadi_Cohen, jncc, Mattbr, pclark22, Magmoiselle, oldecat
A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Ver também 19 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 13 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
This is good stuff. Extremely subversive, fantastically realist writing. Several great stories, with a couple of softer ones. ( )
  yazzy12 | May 17, 2020 |
In each of Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky's seven stories that are found in Memories of the Future, a character takes to the streets of Moscow to reflect on the central focus of the narrative. There's Sutulin, restlessly pacing back and forth, too afraid to enter his ever-expanding apartment. There's the "theme catcher" from The Bookmark, lamenting on the lack of artistry in contemporary Soviet Literature while making up incredible new stories just by observing his surroundings. There's the gravedigger from The Thirteenth Category of Reason, riding a tram with a dead man who was too late to go to his own funeral. And there's Max Shterer, sitting on a park bench with nowhere to stay now that he's back from the future. The characters' understanding of where they are and why they are there is central to the work of Krzhizhanovsky, a man who seems to have loved where he was without necessarily loving when he was.

The stories were very hit-or miss for me. I loved Quadraturin and The Bookmark, liked Someone Else's Theme and The Thirteenth Category of Reason, had mixed feelings about Memories of the Future, and couldn't get into the others at all.

Because of the limited amount of space an author has in a short story, creating a sense of place is crucial if the reader stands any chance of connecting with the narrative. If it takes too long for the reader to find his/her footing on whatever/wherever the literary terra firma of the piece may be, there just isn't enough time left to say anything interesting. Krzhizhanovsky deals with some lofty, abstract concepts, and I thought in The Branch Line and Red Snow, both of them heavy critiques of the Soviet Union, he didn't give himself room to flesh those out.

When Krzhizhanovky's on the ball, though, he's a funny and incisive critic of the world around him. The Bookmark in particular stuck out to me in this regard. Centered around a narrator who is interacting with a brilliant, unpublished writer (which parallels Krzhizhanovsky himself, as none of the stories in this book were published in his lifetime), we get a great feel for the limitations on artistic expression in Russia, even before Stalin's Great Purges.

While not one to be overly bitter about things, Krzhizhanovsky writes like a man who knows he was born at the wrong time to be successful. He was gracious enough, however, to not hold that against the city he inhabited. Moscow comes to life in these stories as a city filled with buildings that have given up and people who haven't. I'm far more familiar with literature based in Saint Petersburg, so I really enjoyed the opportunity to explore a new city through a contemporary author's eyes.

In Joanne Turnbull's introduction to the book, she includes a quote from Krzhizhanovsky about why Shakespeare's work was so inundated with dreams: "The answer is plain. A dream is the only instance when we apprehend our thoughts as external facts." Krzhizhanovsky wrote the way he dreamed, imagining new ways to evaluate life, death, time, and creativity while he wandered through a park in Moscow. ( )
  bgramman | May 9, 2020 |
A philosophy of life is more terrible than syphilis and people - you have to give them credit - take every precaution not to become infected. Especially by a philosophy of life.

Obscure authors are only exhumed with praise, not sober reflections on potential inclusion in the canon. No, hysterics and mashed analogies are required; its as if ______ had a baby who grew addicted to mescaline and rewrote _____. Rebirth also requires nudges and casual mention. I suppose that was Goodreads has become a nudging machine for the authors without bodies. Can you feel the tension between the molecular and molar now? I thought you could.

http://www.nybooks.com/books/authors/sigizmund-krzhizhanovsky/

This collection is astounding. These are stories of the highest order. These pieces are in the ball park with Borges and Kis.: I mean that. That said, they remain unusually foreign and unique. This isn't as if anyone went drinking with anyone else as interpreted by Ozu or Bresson; such be Rhizomic. These are dreamy portraits which ponder the possible and deflate in the face of the horrific

Everyone needs to read these, quickly now.

( )
  jonfaith | Feb 22, 2019 |
This is a collection of weirdly imaginative, usually surreal, and always interesting tales. Written in the 1920s by a slightly subversive author whose stories couldn’t be published until after his death, these tales are darkly whimsical reflections on Soviet society: Existential despair in a room that gets bigger on the inside, everyday Literary Criticism on a city bench, a vagrant table-to-table philosopher who sells aphorisms and totally original systems of thought for a living, a Time Traveller struggling to build and rebuild his machine after the war.

Several of these are very entertaining in an off-beat, slighly unusual kind of way, as though they were written in a culture with perceptibly different standards, tropes and expectations. Some would do very well in collections of Early Science Fiction. Most of these tales would appeal to those with an academic interest in Literature or Criticism, because they are explicitly about writing, reading, engaging with literature, and confronting themes with Theories. This is why I’d recommend spacing these stories out a bit: they’re very different tales, but the approach gets a bit samey after three or four in quick succession.

If you’d like your Borges with more black humour and set in Moscow, less everything-and-the-kitchen-sink and more focused, then give Krzhizhanovsky a try. ( )
2 vote Petroglyph | Jan 2, 2018 |
My full review is at http://kateofmind.blogspot.com/2011/01/100-books-1-sigizmund-krzhizhanovskys.htm...

In brief, fans of Mikhail Bulgakov, Yevgeny Zamyatin, Philip K. Dick or Jorge Luis Borges would all find something to please here, first-rate fabulism mixed in with a great deal of stark portrayals of life in the early days of Soviet Russia. The translation is a bit uneven (for me, a story that should have been my favorite, "The Branch Line," was spoilt by too much clumsy alliteration and florid word choices) but 'tis mostly glorious and I do recommend these stories! ( )
  KateSherrod | Aug 1, 2016 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 13 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
In the 1920s, a disaffected Soviet encyclopedia editor named Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky — a man haunted by Kant’s “Critique of Pure Reason” and by Communist realities — began writing a series of philosophical, allegorical, fantastical short stories. Seven of them appear in “Memories of the Future,” a selection of his fiction that takes its title from the book’s longest entry — the tale of a brusque monomaniac who builds a “timecutter” to eject himself from 1920s Moscow. None of these ­stories were published in Krzhizhanovsky’s lifetime. This was not because the work had been rejected or because it was, well, a little weird. Krzhizhanovsky, it seems, was too proud, too shy or (more likely) too frightened to show them around — given that he was spinning his dystopic fictions at about the same time that Stalin was collectivizing the Soviet countryside.
adicionada por fannyprice | editarNew York Times (Oct 22, 2009)
 

» Adicionar outros autores

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Krzhizhanovsky, Sigizmundautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Formozov, NikolaiTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Turnbull, JoanneTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

Belongs to Publisher Series

Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Locais importantes
Acontecimentos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Prémios e menções honrosas
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Citações
Últimas palavras
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Língua original
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
DDC/MDS canónico
Canonical LCC

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês (1)

"Written in Soviet Moscow in the 1920s but considered too subversive even to show to a publisher the seven tales included here attest to Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky's boundless imagination, black humor, and breathtaking irony- a man loses his way in the vast black waste of his own small room; the Eiffel Tower runs amok; a kind soul dreams of selling everything you need for suicide ; an absentminded passenger boards the wrong train, winding up in a place where night is day, nightmares are the reality, and the backs of all facts have been broken; a man out looking for work comes across a line for logic but doesn't join it as there's no guarantee the logic will last; a sociable corpse misses his own funeral; an inventor gets a glimpse of the far-from-radiant communist future."

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Capas populares

Ligações Rápidas

Avaliação

Média: (3.83)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3 14
3.5 4
4 27
4.5 1
5 8

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 163,329,446 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível