Página InicialGruposDiscussãoExplorarZeitgeist
Pesquisar O Sítio Web
Já deu uma olhada no SantaThing, a tradição de oferta de prendas do LibraryThing?
dispensar
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

The Innocent por Ian McEwan
A carregar...

The Innocent (original 1990; edição 2005)

por Ian McEwan

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
2,185435,546 (3.69)58
The setting is Berlin. Into this divided city, wrenched between East and West, between past and present; comes twenty-five-year-old Leonard Marnham, assigned to a British-American surveillance team. Though only a pawn in an international plot that is never fully revealed to him, Leonard uses his secret work to escape the bonds of his ordinary life - and to lose his unwanted innocence. The promise of his new life begins to be fulfilled as Leonard becomes a crucial part of the surveillance team, while simultaneously being initiated into a new world of love and sex by Maria, a beautiful young German woman. It is a promise that turns to horror in the course of one terrible evening - a night when Leonard Marnham learns just how much of his innocence he's willing to shed.… (mais)
Membro:d_ray
Título:The Innocent
Autores:Ian McEwan
Informação:Vintage (2005), Paperback, 240 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Informação Sobre a Obra

The Innocent por Ian McEwan (1990)

A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Ver também 58 menções

Inglês (37)  Espanhol (3)  Norueguês (1)  Italiano (1)  Holandês (1)  Todas as línguas (43)
Mostrando 1-5 de 43 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Even after reflecting on this book for a few days after finishing it, I'm still not sure if I actually enjoyed it. Like all of McEwan's novels that I've read it is very well written and highly engaging, but I am becoming less and less fond of his narrative style. In each of his books he presents us with relatively normal protagonists, living relatively normal lives. But then he makes them do horrible things because they "lose control" over their own actions (usually through an initial inaction or incapability of stepping back from making poor reactionary choices). I figured that maybe this novel would be different because it is set in Cold War-era Berlin, and the protagonist is a low-level government spy (more of a technician, but he gets drawn into more active espionage), but instead of writing outside his own narrative structure and focusing on the man's role in spying on the East Germans or his life in Berlin McEwan throws in an accidental murder and finishes with a mad-cap race to cover up the evidence. It made for some hair-raising moments while reading, but when compared to his other books (particularly the Cement Garden) this plot structure becomes quite passé. ( )
  JaimieRiella | Feb 25, 2021 |
The Innocent by Ian McEwan

My first impression on starting this book was, "oh, goody, a semi historical novel with lots of detail on building the tunnel under Berlin to tap the Russian communication cables. " And so it begins, but then morphs into a much darker tale about guilt and innocence. (I should have known, having read other McEwan books.)

I will spare you what happens to avoid spoilers; most of that is available elsewhere anyway. McEwan's genius his his ability to dig into the subconscious of his characters and root around. What's found is not always pleasant.

To give you a flavor of his ability to use language, I give you this quote from The Guardian on the election of Donald Trump in 2016.

"Charles Darwin could not believe that a kindly God would create a parasitic wasp that injects its eggs into the body of a caterpillar so that the larva may consume the host alive. The ichneumon wasp was a challenge to Darwin’s already diminishing faith. We may share his bewilderment as we contemplate the American body politic and what vile thing now squats within it, waiting to be hatched and begin its meal." *

Brilliant.

*https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2016/nov/12/ian-mcewan-only-hope-is-that-trump-was-lying-all-along ( )
  ecw0647 | Feb 7, 2021 |
Enjoyed most of it -- except some parts that were intentionally difficult scenes. Interesting thinking about post WW2 Berlin pre-Wall. As always, McEwan writes brilliantly. ( )
  KarenMcCollough | Jul 21, 2019 |
In the 1990 “The Innocent”, Ian McEwan continued his trend of doling out a surprise wallop in the midst of a standard story – boy meets girl, misconceptions, shit hits the fan, boy separates from girl, and then many years later… maybe, finally.

It’s post WWII in Berlin. The Americans, English, Russians, mingle with the Germans in states of distrust, frenemy, multiple security clearance levels, and spying. Leonard Marnham, 25, is the billboard Englishman, outwardly kind, quiet, a certifiable nerd working in Berlin as a technician. His best friend in Berlin is Bob Glass, the loud stereotype American who is a military man and is one of Leonard’s main contact for the ‘secret project’ (which is real – “The Berlin Tunnel”, or Operation Gold from 1955 but most of the events in the story are fictional.). Maria Eckdorf, 30, is the divorced German lady Leonard meets one night in a night club; she’s unusually independent living on her own, but also with the baggage of a violent ex-husband, Otto.

The writing is very McEwan. The words and pages of the main story (boy-girl relationship) flowed effortlessly. Unfortunately, the technical details of the spy story were meh. They weren’t interesting and read more like time/page fillers until Leonard and Maria are off work and can continue with their story. The ‘wallop’ I mentioned was repulsive and excessive; that’s chapter 18 if you want to skim pass that. The gruesomeness may or may not be necessary to explain the decisions made, particularly by Leonard; personally, I don’t think it’s needed.

As mild mannered as Leonard is supposedly, I became very angry at him for a specific action that frightened Maria. While I understand the sequence of events, his base motivation is unacceptable. What is up with men’s need to dominate?!? I was also disappointed with Maria. It’s her baggage that she has now involved Leonard. In short, I disliked both protagonists! The key secondary character who has been nothing but truthful became my favorite character, Bob Glass.

Though I generally like McEwan’s works, I won’t recommend this one.

One quote:
On Sex – his first time:
“Of what followed he remembered only two things. The first was that it was rather like going to see a film that everybody else had been talk about: difficult to imagine in advance, but once there, installed, partly recognition, partly surprise. The encompassing slippery smoothness, for example, was much as he had hoped – even better, in fact – while nothing in his extensive reading had prepared him for the crinkly sensation of having another’s public hair pressed against his own. The second was awkward. He had read all about premature ejaculation and wondered if he would suffer, and now it seemed he might. It was not movement that threatened to bring him on. It was when he looked at her face. She was lying on her back, for they were what she had taught him to call auf Altdeutsch. Sweat had restyled her hair into snaky coils and her arms were thrown up behind her heads, with the palms spread, like a comic-book representation of surrender. At the same time she was looking up at him in a knowing, kindly way. It was just this combination of abandonment and loving attention that was too good to be looked at, too perfect for him, and he had to avert his eyes, or close them, and think of… of, yes, a circuit diagram, a particularly intricate and lovely one he had committed to memory during the fitting of signal activation units to the Ampex machines. ( )
1 vote varwenea | May 25, 2018 |
I really enjoyed this book - brilliantly capturing the cold war Berlin as seen and lived by the innocent (very innocent) young protagonist as he falls in love and becomes a man. ( )
  NaggedMan | Dec 22, 2017 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 43 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Ian McEwan has concentrated too much of his artistic energy on the surface of his story, has burnished it to such a high finish that not only the eye but the mind slides over and, ultimately, off the page.

Despite all that, I have to say that The Innocent is marvelously entertaining, filled with dark irony, with horror and regret.
adicionada por jburlinson | editarNew York Review of Books, John Banville (sítio Web pago) (Dec 6, 1990)
 

Belongs to Publisher Series

Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Locais importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Acontecimentos importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Filmes relacionados
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Prémios e menções honrosas
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
To Penny
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
It was Lieutenant Lofting who dominated the meeting. "Look here, Marnham. You've only just arrived, so there's no reason why you should know the situation. It's not the Germans or the Russians who are the problem here. It isn't even the French. It's the Americans. They don't know a thing. What's worse, they won't learn, they won't be told. It's just how they are."
Citações
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
(Carregue para mostrar. Atenção: Pode conter revelações sobre o enredo.)
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Língua original
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
DDC/MDS canónico
Canonical LCC

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês (1)

The setting is Berlin. Into this divided city, wrenched between East and West, between past and present; comes twenty-five-year-old Leonard Marnham, assigned to a British-American surveillance team. Though only a pawn in an international plot that is never fully revealed to him, Leonard uses his secret work to escape the bonds of his ordinary life - and to lose his unwanted innocence. The promise of his new life begins to be fulfilled as Leonard becomes a crucial part of the surveillance team, while simultaneously being initiated into a new world of love and sex by Maria, a beautiful young German woman. It is a promise that turns to horror in the course of one terrible evening - a night when Leonard Marnham learns just how much of his innocence he's willing to shed.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Capas populares

Ligações Rápidas

Avaliação

Média: (3.69)
0.5 1
1 4
1.5 4
2 23
2.5 6
3 104
3.5 51
4 172
4.5 19
5 62

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 164,314,140 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível