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The Witches Of Eastwick por John Updike
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The Witches Of Eastwick (original 1984; edição 2009)

por John Updike (Autor)

Séries: The Eastwick Novels (1)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaDiscussões / Menções
2,854373,701 (3.3)1 / 181
Based in the fictional Rhode Island town of Eastwick in the late '60s, this novel follows the witches Alexandra Spofford, Jane Smart, and Sukie Rougemont who acquire their powers after leaving or being left by their husbands.
Membro:DavidBrackenbury
Título:The Witches Of Eastwick
Autores:John Updike (Autor)
Informação:Penguin (2009)
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

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The Witches of Eastwick por John Updike (1984)

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Inglês (34)  Francês (1)  Italiano (1)  Todas as línguas (36)
Mostrando 1-5 de 36 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Tror jeg bare leste den første siden før jeg forstå at dette kom jeg dessverre ikke til å like. Føler jeg kommer til å sløse tid ved å lese denne boken, vil heller bare se filmen egentlig.
  Danpo | Jun 20, 2021 |
This book was not great......but the movie is really bad, so the book can really luxuriate in comparison.

The witches were just okay until Daryl showed up; after that they were thoroughly unlikable.

I kind of wish John Irving had just issued a press release with his thoughts and feelings on strong women and his issues with them. ( )
  Equestrienne | Jan 5, 2021 |
I've never seen the movie, but after finishing this I wasnt able to envisage Cher, Pfeiffer and Kidman as the characters therein. This is an absolutely stunning read, as Updike takes his usual (but always brilliantly crafted) themes of sex and dalliance in a New England setting...and adds a touch of Halloween.
Three divorcees - mothers in their 30s with jobs and kids and dogs in a small Rhode Island town- meet up for drinks, gossip and a bit of witchcraft. There's earth-mother Alexandra, with her sculpture, health fears and flabby thighs, sparky red-head journalist Sukie and the most unknowable and dark cellist Jane.
Then one day wealthy stranger Darryl van Horne moves into town; his scientific interests make him something of a wizard and all three make a play for him.
Updike can't write a bad novel; I gravitate more to his tales of real people, but this was unputdownable. Emphatically not about comedy or special effects (I think of the movie and feel unmotivated to watch it) with themes of murder, suicide, death-wishing and orgiastic playtimes at Mr Horne's mansion. All set to read the sequel.... ( )
  starbox | Sep 26, 2020 |
I tried, I really did. I loved this movie and for me the movie was much better than this book. It was over-written (is that a thing?) because that's how it felt to me. I just wanted to read about these three women who are witches living in Eastwick. Instead Updike spends so much time on a lot of minutiae that I just didn't care to finish this.

I have talked to three other people and one had a reaction similar to mine (though she finished, and is still mad she didn't just put it away) one who was meh to the book and the third person who loved it and kept screeching they couldn't believe that I didn't like this since I am such a big reader. Yeah I like to read, not torture myself, this book was feeling mighty painful til I threw up the white flag of surrender.

Besides knowing that the three women are called Alexandra, Jane, and Sukie. I had some True Blood flashbacks cause of the name (same pronunciation, different spelling) and that's about it.

Updike spends so much time overly describing these three women and how their marriages ended (or didn't end, I still don't know) that my eyes started to glaze. I think one of them is a mat? I refuse to go back and read this book again. One of my friends told me that Updike was writing symbolically and that the one husband wasn't turned into anything and my response was I refuse to care about this and they started laughing. So there's that at least.

And I don't even know what to call this writing, purple prose on acid maybe. Cause everything was just too much. I at one point was all can you just get to the point?! The point!

There are just huge blocks of text staring at you because Updike doesn't seem to know how to end thoughts/paragraphs. And then you will have characters having three to five different inner thoughts and you want to scream because once again you just want to say get to the point.

I have never read an Updike before this one and I doubt that I will read any in the future. ( )
  ObsidianBlue | Jul 1, 2020 |
Originally, I told myself I'd give this book to the 10% mark to grab me, and then I'd DNF it. I did make it to 40%! But as I reflected on it this weekend, I realized I still couldn't say I was actually enjoying it at all on pretty much any level. Time to cut my losses.

Turn-Offs, in order of irritation:
- a male author writing female characters rhapsodizing about their newfound embrace of womanhood as they got older, got divorced, became witches. Bold move, Cotton. WORSE, there were 2 different places in which a female character muses on that natural healing nature/instinct of women... sexual healing, natch. The more a guy is a depressed, useless, schlubby, unattractive loser, the more they just want to open their bodies to him to provide him that sexual healing. Of course. That screams male wish-fulfillment waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay more than it does female sexual empowerment!

At least 2/3 of the women are sleeping with married men (not their first time doing that, either...) with no compunctions about it, but neither do they seem especially happy or fulfilled by it. And then they all sort of compete for/share in the "affections" of the newcomer to the town, who is this abrasive, overbearing, mansplaining dick.

- hard to catch any of the historicity of the setting. Peak sexual revolution and social upheaval, and none of it more than barely mentioned in passing a couple times. What's the point?

- sentences for days. I don't think of myself as the kind of person typically bothered by superfluous details in books (I like all the food descriptions in ASoIaF!), but damn, those were a lot of words to say not a lot about nothing very important, over and over. So many semicolons.

- it was hard to get a grip on how said magic existed. I'm willing to give some leeway on this, but this is an otherwise real-life historical ("Vietnam era") setting with otherwise normal life crap going on, but their magic is definitely real, apparently. It's just taken for granted that they found this outlet, which... if this is an integral part to their new identities... And I mean, I'm cool with unexplained magic, and authors/creators often go wrong in trying to justify or explain the inexplicable. But this is not set up necessarily as "the world is magic, deal with it," so it's just this odd choice that's not even the point of anything, so why...? ( )
  elam11 | May 30, 2020 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 36 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Mr. Updike takes ''sisterhood is powerful'' at its word and imagines it literally. What if sisterhood really is powerful? What will the sisters use their ''powers'' for? And what - given human nature, of which Mr. Updike takes not too bright a view - what then? Luckily these witches are only interested in the ''personal,'' rather than the ''political''; otherwise they might have done something unfrivolous, like inventing the hydrogen bomb.... ''The Witches of Eastwick'' is an excursion rather than a destination. Like its characters, it indulges in metamorphoses, reading at one moment like Kierkegaard, at the next like Swift's ''Modest Proposal,'' and at the next like Archie comics, with some John Keats thrown in. This quirkiness is part of its charm, for, despite everything, charming it is. As for the witches themselves, there's a strong suggestion that they are products of Eastwick's - read America's - own fantasy life.
adicionada por Lemeritus | editarNew York Times, Margaret Atwood (May 18, 1984)
 

» Adicionar outros autores (12 possíveis)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Updike, Johnautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Brisk, DavidTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

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"And oh yes," Jane Smart said in her hasty yet purposeful way; each s seemed the black tip of a just-extinguished match held in a playful hurt, as children do, against the skin. "Sukie said a man has bought the Lenox mansion."
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For the last time...the exact blue of such a July day falls into my eyes. My lids lift, my corneas admit the light, my lenses focus it, my retinas and optic nerve report it to the brain. Tomorrow the Earth's poles will tilt a day more toward August and autumn, and a slightly different tincture of light and vapor will be distilled.
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Based in the fictional Rhode Island town of Eastwick in the late '60s, this novel follows the witches Alexandra Spofford, Jane Smart, and Sukie Rougemont who acquire their powers after leaving or being left by their husbands.

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2 edições deste livro foram publicadas por Penguin Australia.

Edições: 0141188979, 0141045604

 

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