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The Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt…
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The Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America (original 2009; edição 2009)

por Douglas Brinkley (Autor)

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7621322,473 (3.69)33
Evaluates Theodore Roosevelt's role in launching modern conservationsim, identifying the contributions of such influences as James Audubon and John Muir while describing how Roosevelt's exposure to natural wonders in his early life shaped his environmental values.
Membro:MelissaKelley
Título:The Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America
Autores:Douglas Brinkley (Autor)
Informação:HarperCollins (2009), Edition: 1, 940 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
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The Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America por Douglas Brinkley (2009)

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Mostrando 1-5 de 13 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
This book covered in meticulous detail the hunting and conservation activities of Theodore Roosevelt. It also covered his childhood activities that led into it. It was far more detail that I cared to read. I soon found that through the book there was a repeating pattern of meeting someone & working toward a common goal. And also a description of how much or how little their goals were in common.

The acquaintance and relationship with dozens of people who were like minded as hunters, ornithologists, or conservation minded were described. It made me wish I knew a little more about people on the other side. I also though about the contradiction between his outrage at other people killing animals and his continued hunting and killing of those same animals.

The book was worthwhile in that I came to appreciate some of the conflicts that caused people to oppose the conversation efforts. It seemed like the conflict between the elite wanting to make preserves for their own hunting pleasure vs the poor who hunt for subsistence wasn't covered. ( )
  bread2u | Jul 1, 2020 |
Bought it because of national parks and TR.
Felt like an overlong Publish or Perish, over 40 hours, or nearly 1000 pages, and drily academic in tone. Not well done, I was extremely disappointed.
The narrator was adequate. ( )
  jetangen4571 | Jul 5, 2016 |
Theodore Roosevelt defies easy description or characterization. Forceful to the point of being bull-headed, energetic and capable of work beyond the capacity of most people, he dominated the first decade of the 1900s in the United States, setting the tone for the American Century. His public service was guided by his progressive worldview, even as it was limited by certain blindspots in that worldview.

Tackling the gamut of Roosevelt's passions and experiences is daunting, so perhaps historian Douglas Brinkley was wise to narrow his focus to Roosevelt's lifelong interest in the natural world and his well-known push for conservation in his political career. Even so, Brinkley's book, The Wilderness Warrior, is an 800-page narrative. Through this depth of research, some of which seems to be newly rediscovered, he paints a compelling overall portrait of the 26th President.

Roosevelt's passion for nature began early in his life. Even before he was a teenager, he was identifying birds and collecting (and preserving) specimens for his personal collection. His youthful passion and precocious knowledge brought him into conversation with some leading collectors and naturalists of the period (helped, no doubt, by his father's influence and connections).

Roosevelt's interest in nature yielded a number of things in his life. It led to a lifetime of hunting trips around the world – though when he was president, some of these trips were partially stage-managed to give him every opportunity to make the big kill. As part of these trips, though, Roosevelt not only brought back game to stuff but cataloged his observations of bird and animal life. This led to his authoring several books and articles on the animals and birds of North America.

Fully half of the book details Roosevelt's actions as a conservationist president, establishing bird sanctuaries, forests, parks and monuments across the country, but especially in the American West. Often, Roosevelt faced significant opposition to establishing and policing these new federal lands – indeed, some of the rangers were killed by poachers and loggers.

Overall, Brinkley offers a deep appreciation for Roosevelt's legacy in land management (which is why he offers such compelling accounts of the obstacles faced in establishing the conservation system). He has a good eye for some of the contradictions in Roosevelt's character – the naturalistic components of the “Rough Riders” expedition are both amusing and mind-boggling – but is at his best in showing how Roosevelt's lifelong passion for the natural world significantly impacted his influential life. It was not a hobby (though one wonders if Roosevelt could have any aspect of his life that was “only” a hobby), but a motivating purpose from his earliest years. ( )
  ALincolnNut | Mar 16, 2015 |


Just never could get into this. Writing is pompous and overdone making sections of this book almost unreadable. ( )
  lincolnpan | Dec 31, 2014 |
I can't decide whether to criticze this book for its length - 817 pp plus appendices, notes, etc. Well, I did read it entirely so such complaint would lack credibility. It was interesting to learn in great depth TR's passionate interest in nature, conservation and preservation. We are fortunate that he was so passionate about this and determined to act on this, as in his era the country was on the way to being irretrievably despoiled by corporate rapaciousness. To a large degree great damage had been done, particularly to wildlife, e.g.s bison, birds decimated for their plummage, etc. The deep feelings TR had for nature, grounded by his belief in Darwin's science, were put into action by bold decisions, most notably the Antiquities Act of 1906 that authorized the president to designate national monuments without congressional approval.

Despite his genuine reverence for nature TR was a vigorous hunter throughout his life. The author notes that TR's hunts always included a scientific aspects as he wrote on his observations for the naturalist community and collected specimens for museums.

You get a good sense of the driving force of TR's personality and his energy and exuberance in his dealings with friends and foes. There is little mention of the other political and diplomatic endeavors during his presidency, only enough to keep the story line moving along.

I picked up this book in the visitors' center of the Muir Woods during a recent vacation. The woods visually and spiritually affirm how valuable to all generations was TR's commitment to nature preservation. ( )
  stevesmits | Oct 25, 2014 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 13 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Brinkley... has absorbed a huge amount of research, but encyclopedic inclusiveness and repetition occasionally mar narrative movement... But this book has Rooseveltian energy. It is largehearted, full of the vitality of its subject and a palpable love for the landscapes it describes.
 
Mr. Brinkley’s fervent enthusiasm for his material eventually prevails over the book’s sprawling data and slow pace.
adicionada por Shortride | editarThe New York Times, Janet Maslin (Jul 23, 2009)
 
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Defenders of the short-sighted men who in their greed and selfishness will, if permitted, rob our country of half its charm by their reckless extermination of all useful and beautiful wild things sometimes seek to champion them by saying that "the game belongs to the people."  So it does, and not merely to the people now alive, but to the unborn people.  The "greatest good for the greatest number" applies to the number within the womb of time, compared to which those now alive form but an insignificant fraction.  Our duty to the whole, including the unborn generations, bids us to restrain an unprincipled present-day minority from wasting the heritage of these unborn generations.  The movement for the conservation of wild life and the larger movement for the conservation of all our natural resources are essentially democratic in spirit, purpose, and method.
 - Theodore Roosevelt, A Book-lover's Holidays in the Open (1916)
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Dedicated to the memory of Dr. John A. Gable (1943 - 2005), executive director of the Theodore Roosevelt Association; and Sheila Schafer of Medora, North Dakota, whom I love with all my heart; and Robert M. Utley (aka "Old Bison") Historian of the American West.
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On a wintry morning in 1903 President Theodore Roosevelt arrived at a White House cabinet meeting unexpectedly and with great exuberance.
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Evaluates Theodore Roosevelt's role in launching modern conservationsim, identifying the contributions of such influences as James Audubon and John Muir while describing how Roosevelt's exposure to natural wonders in his early life shaped his environmental values.

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