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Dead Aid: Why Aid Is Not Working and How There Is a Better Way for Africa (2009)

por Dambisa Moyo

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6772625,632 (3.6)27
In "Dead Aid," Dambisa Moyo describes the state of postwar development policy in Africa that has channeled billions of dollars in aid but failed to reduce poverty and increase growth. He offers a new, more hopeful vision of how to address the desperate poverty that plagues millions.
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Mostrando 1-5 de 26 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
I have conflicted feelings, and while I want to rate it higher than three stars, my concerns that were kind of glossed over in the book are keeping me at three stars for now. Specifically, Moyo is very pro free market, which makes me a little wary (not because I am anti free market, but because I haven't drunk the free market kool-aid). But at the same time, she doesn't address the potentially dangerous role corporations might play in an aid-free development situation (or are possibly already playing). Not to mention the greater, long-term human rights concerns which get a mention, but I feel were glossed over for the most part (Sudan, China, etc.).

It's worth reading certainly, and I agree with the initial premise of government-to-government aid being a bad thing, but I don't know if I buy her solution. ( )
1 vote 0xreid | Jul 4, 2020 |
Finally! A book written about Africa by an African woman. This is an excellent book for anyone who is interested in international development, development aid, and nonprofits. Moyo examines the role these play and the global institutions who on the surface seem to have great intentions yet the implications of their good will can frequently do more harm than good.

If you're looking for a critical and knowledgable book about our global aid system, this is an incredibly insightful read written by a brilliant African author. ( )
  ChelCreads | Apr 6, 2020 |
Hard to argue with anything about this book. Author clearly has domain knowledge and the solutions make sense. In fact it could have even been a smaller book without losing anything important. Still well worth the read. ( )
  Skybalon | Mar 19, 2020 |
Zambia
  oirm42 | May 21, 2018 |
"In the past fifty years, more than $1 trillion in development-related aid has
been transferred from rich countries to Africa. Has this assistance improved
the lives of Africans? No. In fact, across the continent, the recipients of
this aid are not better off as a result of it, but worse - much worse. Moyo
describes the state of postwar development policy in Africa today and
unflinchingly confronts one of the greatest myths of our time: that billions of
dollars in aid sent from wealthy countries to developing African nations has
helped to reduce poverty and increase growth. In fact, poverty levels continue
to escalate and growth rates have steadily declined - and millions continue to
suffer." --jacket
  collectionmcc | Mar 6, 2018 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 26 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Interview, not so much about the content of the book:
Dambisa Moyo is having her moment. … Moyo believes this dependency relationship is perpetuated by Western governments and glorified by the celebrities who have made Africa their cause du jour. … The question—for Moyo and for Bono, for governments and for celebrities—is not really about whether to help. It's how to help better.
adicionada por baumgartner | editarNewsWeek, Lisa Miller (Mar 30, 2009)
 
The danger is that this book will get more attention than it deserves. It has become fashionable to attack aid to Africa; an overdose of celebrity lobbying and compassion fatigue have prompted harsh critiques of what exactly aid has achieved in the past 50 years.
adicionada por mikeg2 | editarThe Guardian, Madeleine Bunting (Feb 14, 2009)
 
I doubt that many of Africa's problems can be attributed to aid. It is, in my view, something of a sideshow.

I think that Moyo's message is over-optimistic. She implies that, were aid cut, African governments would respond by turning to other sources of finance that would make them more accountable. I think this exaggerates the opportunity for alternative finance and underestimates the difficulties African societies face.

African societies face problems deeper than their dependence on aid. Divided by ethnic loyalties, they are too large to be nations. Yet with only tiny economies, they lack the scale to be effective states. As a result the vital public goods of security and accountability cannot adequately be provided. In their absence the valuable natural assets that many countries possess become liabilities instead of opportunities for prosperity.
adicionada por baumgartner | editarThe Independent, Paul Collier (Jan 30, 2009)
 
Critics of Dambisa Moyo's Proposal Paul Collier, professor of economics at Oxford, and one of Moyo's teachers, believes that her message is overly optimistic. He suggests that donors must insist on transparent budgeting and accountability on the receiving side. African societies don't need predominantly money but help with peacekeeping,security guarantees, trade privileges and promoting good governance. Other critics fear that Moyo's harsh judgment of aid will encourage Western governments to cut back on their aid promises, while there are no other solutions in place. Whether one agrees with her argument or not, Dambisa Moyo offers an accessible summary of anti-aid arguments based on statistics and anecdotal evidence bolstered with an extensive bibliography. She deeply wishes for a better outcome on both sides: for those desperate to survive on less than a US$1 a-day in sub-Saharan Africa and those who want to help.
 
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To the Excellencies and officials of Europe: We suffer enormously in Africa. Help us. We have problems in Africa. We lack rights as children. We have war and illness, we lack food . . . We want to study, and we ask you to help us to study so we can be like you, in Africa.

Message found on the bodies of Guinean teenagers Yaguine Koita and Fode Tounkara, stowaways who died attempting to reach Europe in the landing gear of an airliner.
The best time to plant a tree is twenty years ago. The second-best time is now.

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We live in a culture of aid.
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In "Dead Aid," Dambisa Moyo describes the state of postwar development policy in Africa that has channeled billions of dollars in aid but failed to reduce poverty and increase growth. He offers a new, more hopeful vision of how to address the desperate poverty that plagues millions.

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