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The Children's Book (2009)

por A. S. Byatt

Outros autores: Ver a secção outros autores.

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaDiscussões / Menções
3,7892093,222 (3.81)1 / 685
When Olive Wellwood's oldest son discovers a runaway named Philip sketching in the basement of the new Victoria and Albert Museum--a talented working-class boy who could be a character out of one of Olive's magical tales--she takes him into the storybook world of her family and friends--a world that conceals more treachery and darkness than Philip has ever imagined and that will soon be eclipsed by far greater forces.… (mais)
  1. 110
    War and Peace por Leo Tolstoy (WoodsieGirl)
    WoodsieGirl: The more I read of The Children's Book, the more it reminded me of War and Peace - the same juxtaposition of small-scale, human dramas against the sweep of history, and the same knack for introducing characters as children who are recognisably the same people as the adults at the end of the book.… (mais)
  2. 80
    Atonement por Ian McEwan (BookshelfMonstrosity)
  3. 81
    The Forgotten Garden por Kate Morton (rbtanger)
    rbtanger: Similar in time frame to The Children's Book, but with a much more satisfactory central mystery and ending. Also contains a fairy-tale authoress and several inserted "tales".
  4. 10
    Sugar and Other Stories por A.S. Byatt (KayCliff)
    KayCliff: The genesis of "The Children's Book" can be seen in the short story, "The Changeling".
  5. 10
    Little, Big por John Crowley (Crypto-Willobie)
  6. 10
    Life After Life por Kate Atkinson (kiwiflowa)
  7. 00
    The Chemistry of Tears por Peter Carey (JoEnglish)
  8. 00
    Tempest-Tost por Robertson Davies (Cecilturtle)
  9. 00
    Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell por Susanna Clarke (Crypto-Willobie)
  10. 00
    The Lake House por Kate Morton (kethorn23)
  11. 24
    Wolf Hall por Hilary Mantel (kidzdoc)
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» Ver também 685 menções

Inglês (191)  Holandês (6)  Espanhol (3)  Italiano (2)  Letão (1)  Francês (1)  Alemão (1)  Norueguês (1)  Catalão (1)  Todas as línguas (207)
Mostrando 1-5 de 207 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Loves this book for the first 200 pages, but then got distracted and moved on to somethings else. I'm sure I'll get back to it someday...
  nogomu | Oct 19, 2023 |
Famous author Olive Wellwood writes a special private book, bound in different colours, for each of her children. In their rambling house near Romney Marsh, they play in a story book world - but their lives, and those of their rich cousins and their friends, the son and daughter of a curator at the new Victoria and Albert Museum, are already inscribed with mystery. Each family carries its own secrets

A difficult book to read - not because of the subject matter, but because it never really engrossed me.

The story is based around the late Victorian/early Edwardian period, against a back drop of the development of the V&A museum and the breakout of the Arts and Crafts movement. Every group of people has secrets from each other - mothers and daughters, fathers and sons, brothers and sisters and each from each other.

The story goes from paragraphs of one sentence, to narrative of whole pages or chapters. Not a lot actually *happens* - people live their lives, secrets are kept and found out and new ones built.

I've read other reviews that imply that it gets "better" in the second hald (less sprawl, more happening) but after page 350, and multiple other books glaring at me to be read, then I have to retire this attempt and go elsewhere ( )
  nordie | Oct 14, 2023 |
Briljante weergave van een periode, aan de hand van de ontwikkeling van een aantal kinderen van families uit verschillende lagen van de Engelse bevolking. Ja, vol details, heel vol, maar mij nergens en nooit vervelend of te veel. De invalshoek van Kunst en Nijverheid-het dan net gerealiseerde Victoria & Albert Museum speelt een wezenlijke rol in het Boek, maakt het nog sterker. En dan het einde! Ontluisterend, hoe een groot aantal van hen opgeofferd wordt aan iets volslagen zinloos. Het boek streeft naar zinvolle invulling van de levens van veel mensen en laat bijna onaangedaan zien hoe zinloos dat streven in ieder geval toen (1985-1916) was. Op vakantie in drie weken gelezen, een ultieme leeservaring. ( )
  leowillemse | Sep 8, 2023 |
Here's what I wrote about this read in 2011: "As a story, just so-so, ok. Only the end of the book, so many lost in WWI, really touched me strongly. Was interesting re social trends of the time, during which the UK Labour Party's genesis was formed and took root (learned some new and interesting history)." ( )
  MGADMJK | Aug 18, 2023 |
No review - read too long ago to recall. ( )
  mykl-s | Aug 12, 2023 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 207 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
The novel has a tendency to sprawl, with too many characters and too much to say. Yet Byatt takes tender care with the reader. She is a careful guide, and though this entry is at times a lot to process, it’s a worthwhile journey.
adicionada por WeeklyAlibi | editarWeekly Alibi, Erin Adair-Hodges (Dec 31, 2009)
 
While Byatt’s engagement with the period’s over­lapping circles of artists and reformers is serious and deep, so much is stuffed into “The Children’s Book” that it can be hard to see the magic forest for all the historical lumber — let alone the light at the end of the narrative tunnel. The action is sometimes cut off at awkward moments by ponderous newsreel-style voice-over or potted lectures in cultural history. Startling revelations are dropped in almost nonchalantly and not picked up again until dozens or even hundreds of pages later. Byatt’s coda on the Great War, dispatched in scarcely more pages than the Exposition Universelle, is devastating in its restraint. But too often readers may feel as if they’re marooned in the back galleries of a museum with a frighteningly energetic docent.
 
Byatt’s characters are themselves her dutiful puppets, always squeezed and shaped for available meaning. The Children’s Book has a cumulative energy and intelligence, and the unavoidable scythe of the Great War brings its own power to the narration, but nowhere in its hundreds of pages is there a single moment like the Countess Rostova’s free and mysterious irritation.
adicionada por jburlinson | editarLondon Review of Books, James Wood (sítio Web pago) (Oct 8, 2009)
 
As in her Booker Prize–winning novel, Possession, here Byatt has constructed a complete and complex world, a gorgeous bolt of fiction, in this case pinned to British events and characters from the 1870s to the end of the Great War...the magic is in the way Byatt suffuses her novel with details, from the shimmery sets of a marionette show to clay mixtures and pottery glazes.
adicionada por Shortride | editarThe Atlantic (Oct 1, 2009)
 
It begins with the discovery of a boy hiding in a museum.

The time is 1895, the boy is Philip Warren, and the museum is the precursor to the Victoria & Albert: the South Kensington Museum. And, oh, yes –there’s a remarkable piece of art that the boy is besotted with — the Gloucester Candlestick. However, while this may make many children’s book mavens think immediately of E. L. Konigsburg’s classical story for children, let me say straight out — A. S. Byatt’s The Children’s Book is a book for grown-ups. It is emphatically not a children’s book although it is about children, about books, about art, about the writing of children’s books, about the telling of children’s stories, about the clash between life and art, and about a whole lot more. A saga of a book teeming with complex characters, fascinating settings, intellectual provocations, and erudite prose, it gets under your skin as you get deeper and deeper into it and won’t let you go even after you reach the last page....
 

» Adicionar outros autores (10 possíveis)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Byatt, A. S.autor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Juva, KerstiTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
McKenzie, NicoletteNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Parker, StephenDesigner da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Stevenson, JulietNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

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Two boys stood in the Prince Consort Gallery, and looked down on a third. It was June 19th, 1895.
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She was not really a playwright. The auditions taught her that. A true playwright makes up people who can be inhabited by actors. A storyteller makes shadow people in the head, autonomous and complete.
She had the feeling writers often have when told perfect tales for fictions, that there was too much fact, too little space for the necessary insertion of inventions, which would appear to be lies.
Olive was sometimes frightened by the relentlessly busy inventiveness of her brain. It was good and consoling that it earned money, real bankable cheques in real envelopes. That anchored it in the real world. And the real world spouted stories wherever she looked at it.
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When Olive Wellwood's oldest son discovers a runaway named Philip sketching in the basement of the new Victoria and Albert Museum--a talented working-class boy who could be a character out of one of Olive's magical tales--she takes him into the storybook world of her family and friends--a world that conceals more treachery and darkness than Philip has ever imagined and that will soon be eclipsed by far greater forces.

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