Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquisar O Sítio Web
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

Mother Night por Kurt Vonnegut
A carregar...

Mother Night (original 1961; edição 1974)

por Kurt Vonnegut

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
6,488761,136 (4.1)184
Truth and justice are blurred when American spy Howard Campbell is tried in Israel as a Nazi war criminal after World War II.
Membro:BgGirl
Título:Mother Night
Autores:Kurt Vonnegut
Informação:Dell Books (1974), Mass Market Paperback
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Updated 08/15, Pocket Paperback

Pormenores da obra

Mother Night por Kurt Vonnegut (1961)

A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Ver também 184 menções

Inglês (74)  Catalão (1)  Espanhol (1)  Todas as línguas (76)
Mostrando 1-5 de 76 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Wordy

It was a fairly quick read, even though I have trouble with books with so much dialog. It was also depressing. ( )
  nmorandi | Jul 16, 2021 |
"We are what we pretend to be, so we must be careful about what we pretend to be." A timely moral from a brilliant novel. Vonnegut's words seem to become more relevant with the passage of time. This should be required reading, especially for those involved in media and politics. ( )
  SeanBoley | Jun 5, 2021 |
3,5 ( )
  Krinsekatze | May 5, 2021 |
We are what we pretend to be, so we must be careful about what we pretend to be.

Howard W. Campbell Jr., the narrator of Vonnegut’s brilliant 1966 novel, pretends to be a Nazi — or as he puts it at the outset of his so-called confessions, “I am an American by birth, a Nazi by reputation, and a nationless person by inclination.” In Campbell’s version of his life story, he became a writer and broadcaster of Nazi propaganda out of expediency — his father-in-law was the chief of police in Berlin; Campbell and his German wife wanted to remain in Germany even after the war began in 1939; joining the Nazi cause was the easiest way to do that. His broadcasts were notoriously vile, filled with hatred and venom toward Jewish people and anyone else who did not conform to the Aryan ideal.

And that for me was the most upsetting thing about this story — that someone could spew such hatred, knowing it would have the most terrible consequences for its targets, without actually feeling strongly one way or the other about the truth of what he said and wrote. The hateful propaganda was a writing exercise, a way for Campbell to keep his creative juices flowing for when the war would end and he could resume his playwriting career. To freely disperse such hate without believing in it — is that not more horrific than the mad ravings of the true believer?

I’ve seen a number of references to this book recently as a sort of foretelling of the current political situation in the United States. As I began reading I expected to find that Campbell represented the people who stormed the US Capitol and tried to overthrow the government, but after reading it I’ve changed my mind. Campbell is the spitting image of every politician, from the very top down to state and local levels, who cynically perpetuated lies and conspiracy theories that they knew to be false, in order to rile up that mob and incite the insurrection. In the end, which is worse?

That's the question that's going to keep me up nights.

I had hoped, as a (propaganda) broadcaster, to be merely ludicrous, but this is a hard world to be ludicrous in, with so many human beings so reluctant to laugh, so incapable of thought, so eager to believe and snarl and hate ( )
1 vote rosalita | Jan 19, 2021 |
"I don't think it's a marvelous moral; I simply happen to know what it is: We are what we pretend to be, so we must be careful about what we pretend to be." The most prominent and relatable quote from this book came not from its characters' dialogue, but Vonnegut himself as the editor of Howard W. Campbell, Jr.'s memoir. Howard is well-known as a Nazi propagandist who once worked with the notorious minister of Nazi propaganda, Joseph Goebbels.

For those of you who have read Slaughterhouse-Five, you'll remember his name as an American who has become a Nazi. But we learn through this book that he's actually a spy for America, transmitting hidden messages through pauses, throat-clears, and inflections on his broadcasted anti-Semitic speeches for the German public. No one knows this fact except the agent who recruited him, Frank Wirtanen. Howard then wrote his memoir in a jail cell while awaiting trial in Israel for the war crimes he committed.

His story is neither of a Nazi propagandist nor the story of an American spy. It's the story of an actor who became engulfed in character so much that Howard actually helps the enemy as much as (or more than?) he helps his country. As his father-in-law once said to him the reason why he couldn't get mad if Howard is secretly a spy, "Because you could never have served the enemy as well as you served us. [...] I realized that almost all the ideas that I hold now, that make me unashamed of anything I may have felt or done as a Nazi, came not from Hitler, not from Goebbels, not from Himmler – but from you."

This short book questions the extent to which we can judge a person based on their intentions or the consequences of their actions and suggests that simplifying the world into pure good and evil characters is a dangerous form of dualism.

The themes in this book are still relevant to our current era, and I can't recommend this book highly enough. It’s written under 200 pages with fractures narrative that flows really well. ( )
  bellacrl | Jan 19, 2021 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 76 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
sem críticas | adicionar uma crítica

» Adicionar outros autores (17 possíveis)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Vonnegut, Kurtautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
夏樹, 池澤Tradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Bevine, VictorNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Dillon, DianeArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Dillon, LeoArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Kapari, MarjattaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Santalahti, MattiTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Locais importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Acontecimentos importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Filmes relacionados
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Prémios e menções honrosas
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Epígrafe
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Breathes there the man, with soul so dead,
Who never to himself hath said,
"This is my own, my native land!"
Whose heart hath ne'er within him
burn'd
As home his footsteps he hath turn'd
From wandering on a foreign strand?
- Sir Walter Scott
Dedicatória
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
To Mata Hari
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
This is the only story of mine whose morals I know. (Introduction)
My name is Howard W. Campbell, Jr.
Citações
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
We are what we pretend to be, so we must be careful what we pretend to be.
Where's evil? It's that large part of every man that wants to hate without limit, that wants to hate with God on its side.
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Língua original
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
DDC/MDS canónico
Canonical LCC

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

Truth and justice are blurred when American spy Howard Campbell is tried in Israel as a Nazi war criminal after World War II.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Capas populares

Ligações Rápidas

Avaliação

Média: (4.1)
0.5 2
1 3
1.5 4
2 33
2.5 9
3 258
3.5 73
4 614
4.5 85
5 523

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 162,172,897 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível