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Strength in What Remains: A Journey of…
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Strength in What Remains: A Journey of Remembrance and Forgiving (original 2009; edição 2010)

por Tracy Kidder

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
1,3348910,619 (3.97)137
The Pulitzer Prize-winning author Tracy Kidder returns with the extraordinary true story of Deo, a young man who arrives in America from Burundi in search of a new life. After surviving a civil war and genocide, he ekes out a precarious existence delivering groceries, living in Central Park, and learning English by reading dictionaries in bookstores until he begins to meet the strangers who will change his life, pointing him eventually in the direction of Columbia University, medical school, and a life devoted to healing.… (mais)
Membro:casanders2015
Título:Strength in What Remains: A Journey of Remembrance and Forgiving
Autores:Tracy Kidder
Informação:Large Print Press (2010), Edition: Lrg, Paperback, 470 pages
Colecções:E Book, Lidos mas não possuídos
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Strength in What Remains por Tracy Kidder (2009)

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Mostrando 1-5 de 88 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
A Tutsi medical student tells a grim story of the slaughter in Burundi. The events leading to his unlikely escape explain, as much as possible, the central African genocide of a decade ago. But that's only part of Tracy Kidder's tale. Equally daunting is how refugee Deo (only his given name is used) overcomes homelessness in New York, completes his medical studies and returns to Burundi, where he builds a clinic and ponders his deliverance. It's a common American story -- I've met a Congolese journalist who fled to become a Chicago janitor -- but few immigrants have a writer as skillful as Kidder to chart their tortuous route here.
  rynk | Jul 11, 2021 |
The story of a young man from Burundi, who narrowly escaped death during a civil war and genocide there, who landed in New York and managed to make something of himself. But not easily. Not quickly. Deogratias (known simply as Deo) spent a long time on the streets, taking showers in apartments that were not his. He survived by working long hours at difficult, underpaid jobs, putting up with prejudice and worse.

Yet the angels smiled on him. That would be one way to look at it. A woman in a church was drawn to his story, to his personality. She was determined to find help for him, and in time she actually did. She found a safe place for him to live, with an educated couple who also saw promise in the young man. Through their help he found his way to college, to earning a medical degree, and finally to returning to his country to try to fulfill a lifelong dream there.

The story is of a remarkable man and of the remarkable persons who helped along the way. It is thus a story of hope in spite of the horrors, both in Burundi and New York.

The one other book I have read by Kidder is Mountains Beyond Mountains, the story of Paul Farmer, founder of Partners in Health, now an international organization dedicated to bringing good medical care to all parts of the world. What distinguishes both books from most biographies is the fact that Kidder becomes a friend, a close friend, to his subjects. In fact, it is probably his friendship with Farmer and his organization that led to his hearing the story of Deogratias and then befriending him. Kidder's approach is warm and sympathetic. He doesn't just tell the story from an arm's length. Rather, he's very much inside it.

Absorbing, at times horrifying, ultimately hopeful. I expect we will hear more of Deogratias. ( )
  slojudy | Sep 8, 2020 |
Tells the story of Deo, who arrives in America after surviving the genocide in Burundi. ( )
  addunn3 | Jul 24, 2020 |
I do love a Tracy Kidder story. The details almost don't matter. He knows how to make even the most boring come to life. This story about African poverty and survival told through the eyes of one man was mostly not boring but did lag here and there and was saved by the Kidder touch. ( )
  susandennis | Jun 5, 2020 |
This was a rough subject, but the author did a great job of letting us into the hard life of the main character. I guess my only "minus" was that I would have preferred if the book was written really chronologically.! I had heard much about the genocide in Rwanda, but was totally unfamiliar with the murdering happening in Burundi.....it was heart breaking to hear about all the horrors. ( )
  yukon92 | May 23, 2020 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 88 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Mr. Kidder’s prose handles beautifully, but there are places it can’t take you, moral and intellectual territory that remain out of reach... I am being hard, I fear, on a book that I read with great interest.
adicionada por Shortride | editarThe New York Times, Dwight Garner (Sep 2, 2009)
 
63-year-old Tracy Kidder may have just written his finest work — indeed, one of the truly stunning books I’ve read this year.
 
It's hard for the reader to escape the conclusion that Deogratias can live with what happened and build his hospital and do good only by lying to himself about the nature of the recent past.

This raises the chewy problem of why Kidder is telling this story. Is it primarily an inspirational tale of an immigrant-made-good, a repudiation of Lou Dobbs-style bigotry? If so, his book succeeds 10 times over in an uncomplicated way. Or does Kidder believe primarily in the need to record accurately what happened during the darkest moments in human history?

If this is his goal, then he is—subtly, sympathetically—chiding his subject.
adicionada por Shortride | editarSlate, Johann Hari (Aug 24, 2009)
 
Once again Tracy Kidder has written about someone who cares deeply about improving health care for the poorest of the poor. Burundi is a small landlocked country in Eastern Africa bordered by Rwanda to the north, Tanzania to the east and south, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo to the west. Burundi is one of the ten poorest countries in the world

 
Kidder uses Deo’s experiences to deliver a very personal and harrowing account of the ethnic genocide in East Central Africa.
adicionada por khuggard | editarBooklist, Vanessa Bush
 

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As we drove through southwestern Burundi, I felt as if we were being followed by the mountain called Ganza, the way a child feels followed by the moon.
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When he realized he wasn't seeing smoke anymore, he took his face away from the window and felt himself begin to relax, a long-forgotten feeling.
Deo had a lot of experience with bargaining, but the whole idea of soliciting tips was new, and, once he understood it, repugnant. His French-speaking African friend at the store explained. No one could survive in New York on fifteen dollars a day. You had to get tips. You lingered in doorways, you cleared your throat, sometimes you asked for a tip outright. But this was the same as begging, Deo thought.
"Deogratias, thanks be to God" was Latin his mother had learned in church. She had nearly died during his gestation and birth; his name was her thanksgiving.
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The Pulitzer Prize-winning author Tracy Kidder returns with the extraordinary true story of Deo, a young man who arrives in America from Burundi in search of a new life. After surviving a civil war and genocide, he ekes out a precarious existence delivering groceries, living in Central Park, and learning English by reading dictionaries in bookstores until he begins to meet the strangers who will change his life, pointing him eventually in the direction of Columbia University, medical school, and a life devoted to healing.

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