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The Widow of the South por Robert Hicks
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The Widow of the South (edição 2009)

por Robert Hicks

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
2,024706,014 (3.58)85
The saga of Carrie McGavock, a lonely Confederate wife who finds purpose transforming her Tennessee plantation into a hospital and cemetery during the Civil War.
Membro:DSFord
Título:The Widow of the South
Autores:Robert Hicks
Informação:Grand Central Publishing (2009), Edition: Reprint, Mass Market Paperback, 560 pages
Colecções:Civil War Era, A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:****
Etiquetas:CWE, Historical fiction based on the story of Carrie McGavock and the Battle of Franklin

Pormenores da obra

The Widow of the South por Robert Hicks

  1. 00
    Enemy Women por Paulette Jiles (juniperSun)
    juniperSun: Both deal with how Southern women were affected by the Civil War, doing what needed to be done to survive
  2. 00
    My Name is Mary Sutter por Robin Oliveira (BookshelfMonstrosity)
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The Battle of Franklin took place in Tennessee on November 30, 1864, just months before the American Civil War’s official end at Appomattox. The battle was a devastating loss for the Confederate side, with casualty figures far exceeding those of other battles. The army designated Carnton, a plantation owned by John McGavock, as a hospital. McGavock’s wife, Carrie, threw herself into caring for the wounded and dying soldiers.

Carrie knows grief, having lost three of her five children. She lives in isolation, rarely going into town. Besides her family, the only person Carrie is in close contact with is Mariah, a Black woman about Carrie’s age, who was a childhood companion and accompanied Carrie when she married John. At first she resists the Army’s demand to take over her house, and is surprised to find herself responding to a call of sorts, working around the clock to provide bandages, water, food, and shelter. After the war, Carrie learns that a prosperous man in town plans to plow up a nearby field that was used as a cemetery. She successfully intervenes and organizes a reburial of all the men interred there, with stones marking each person’s place of rest.

The Widow of the South is Carrie’s story, a fictional account of historic events. Carrie’s role in the creation of the cemetery is well documented, but as is often the case with female historic figures, there is much about her life that is unknown. The novel is an interesting imagining of likely events and circumstances that might have caused Carrie to behave as she did. The author’s note at the end of the book includes photos of Carrie and her family, commentary separating fact from fiction, an an extensive bibliography. I enjoyed reading about a part of Civil War history completely unfamiliar to me, and am glad Robert Hicks chose to celebrate the Carrie McGavock’s important role. ( )
  lauralkeet | Jun 1, 2021 |
Just amazing! Although I know the book is only loosely based on the story of Carrie's life, I can't believe I have lived "down the road" from such a historic site and had never heard of this rich history. I see a road trip in my future. ( )
  BookishHooker | Dec 16, 2019 |
I’m keeping this book to reread if I ever get to Franklin Tennessee. It is the kind of book that combines good storytelling, a strong storyline and historical accuracy into one book. Not being a Civil War buff, I often skimmed the military action, but even that skimming conveyed a horror or what was happening to the soldiers on both sides of the battle. The relationship of slave and owner, relationships among the poor white and the impact the war had on one family is enmeshed in this historical fiction ( )
  brangwinn | May 19, 2019 |
I really wanted to like this book a lot more than I did.

Based on a true story, “The Widow of the South” tells of the aftermath of the Civil War battle of Franklin, Tennessee, a devastating (and now largely-forgotten) bloodbath that left over 9,000 soldiers dead, wounded, captured, or missing. A local plantation house, owned by the McGavock family, was pressed into use as a field hospital, and the family later donated acreage for a cemetery when the shallow graves on the battlefield itself were threatened by the plow as agricultural land was put back into production in the post-war years.

On these bones, Hicks has grafted an odd love story, creating a wounded soldier whose passion for Carrie McGavock helps bring her out of the melancholy resulting from the deaths of three of her children and ultimately gives her the spirit and perseverance to create the memorial.

And that’s where the story faltered for me. Both Carrie and the fictitious Zachariah Cashwell are brilliantly drawn but broken people whose obsession for one another feels forced and essentially baseless. The tale came to life for me only when Carrie and her husband John take on the fictionalized owner of the battlefield graveyard. One wonders what the novel might have been had Hicks chosen to make that conflict the center of the story.
( )
  LyndaInOregon | Dec 14, 2018 |
So scatter-brained and poorly-written I could hardly get into it. ( )
  knp4597 | Mar 19, 2018 |
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Prologue ∙ 1894: Down the rows of the dead they came. Neat, orderly rows of dead rebel boys who thirty years before had either dropped at the foot of earthen works a mile or so away or died on the floors of the big house overlooking the cemetery.
Author's Note: If God was watching that Indian summer afternoon of November 30, 1864 (and some have argued that He was not, another explanation of events), He would have been looking here: on the continent of North America; in the southeastern section of what had once been and would again be called the United States; in the central part of a state they called Tennessee; between the mountains and the great river; among the burial mounds of an ancient Stone Age culture that had known nothing of firearms and artillery; in the bend of a small river at the convergence of three bright macadam roads, where brilliant streaks of light rose and fell along a gentle undulation of hills washed in the dun and yellow and red of autumn.
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Book 1 - November 30, 1864: Dawn: That day in 1864 was unseasonably mild for late November.
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…the smell of men overpowered me. My nose had no experience with such a smell. It could not parse its elements. The smell was heavy and sour and musty, and I took it to be the smell of that world which had been kept at bay by my house and my husband these many years.”
The newspapers were always on about how the best men of our country – and by that, they meant this new country of ours, these Confederate States of America – went off to fight and were lost forever. But what of the best of our women? How many lovely young women were sacrificed behind the plow in those years? Oh, I’m not saying that a woman oughtn’t guide a plow, although I shudder at the thought of my own incompetence at the reins. It’s not the plowing, you see; it’s the elimination of everything BUT plowing, the possibility that you could be anything BUT someone who walked behind a mule and gathered in the snap beans.
My breathing came harder and my face flushed, as it always did when I began to feel unmoored, or upon the discovery that there was yet another thing under the sun that I had not understood. Or both.
Those men were the chains that bound the living. They were the missing whose absence shackled the survivors in place, people afraid to move on for fear of being gone for their sudden return. They drew the living back to the war, back to that battlefield over and over and over again, reenacting its rituals and its skirmishes until they all would be dead. … They will have to come to Carnton. They’ll be safe there. I will mourn them if no one else will.
Someone had to do it, to be that person. I was the woman they wrote the letters to; this house was the last address of the war. Now it was the final resting place of the dead, or at least almost 1,500 of them, and they could not be left alone. I had resolved to remember so others could forget. In the forgetting, I prayed, would be some relief, some respite from the violence and bitterness and vengeance.
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The saga of Carrie McGavock, a lonely Confederate wife who finds purpose transforming her Tennessee plantation into a hospital and cemetery during the Civil War.

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Hachette Book Group

5 edições deste livro foram publicadas por Hachette Book Group.

Edições: 0446697435, 0446578827, 1594831092, 1594835799, 0446558885

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