Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquisar O Sítio Web
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

Seven Daughters and Seven Sons por Barbara…
A carregar...

Seven Daughters and Seven Sons (original 1982; edição 1994)

por Barbara Cohen (Autor), Bahija Lovejoy (Autor)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
5881131,173 (4.28)9
A retelling of a traditional Arabic tale in which a young woman disguises herself as a man and opens up a shop in a distant city in order to help her impoverished family.
Membro:Conni_W
Título:Seven Daughters and Seven Sons
Autores:Barbara Cohen (Autor)
Outros autores:Bahija Lovejoy (Autor)
Informação:HarperTeen (1994), Edition: 1st Beech Tree ed, 224 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:to-read

Pormenores da obra

Seven Daughters and Seven Sons por Barbara Cohen (1982)

A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Ver também 9 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 11 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
3.5 stars

I found this book because it was recommended to me by coding sequence. When I clicked the title I was surprised to see that several of my friends had already read it. So, my question is, why didn't my "good" friends suggest it to me? Why did I have to wait for chance? I feel slightly betrayed. ;)

In this book, the villain in the story seems to be Buran's (and her sisters') feminine sex. They are wretchedly poor because her father has no sons. Buran decides to tackle the problem, refusing to be the victim of her culture. What I loved about this book is that her parents don't stand in her way. They believe in her and in her worth and ability as a person. The villain here is not the parents, a person, or other figure; the villain is society and culture. Although the uncle comes in a close second. :)

Though I was slightly put off by the section that had the male viewpoint (who gets that emotional even if they're female?) it wasn't all bad. But it definitely contributed to the lower score.

* Definitely a teen novel. ( )
  OutOfTheBestBooks | Sep 24, 2021 |
I liked it. 13yo son did not. He thought it was too much like Mulan which we already read this year. ( )
  JennyNau10 | Dec 7, 2019 |
The fourth of seven daughters, Buran grew into young womanhood keenly conscious of the fact that her gentle father, known throughout Baghdad as Abu al-Banat, or "the father of daughters," was considered unlucky to have had so many female children, but no son. Taught to read and write, and to play chess - unusual pursuits for a girl in the medieval Arab world - she had a sharp mind, and when her father grew ill, she convinced him to send her out into the world to make her fortune, just like her wealthy, male cousins. Eventually making her way to the coastal city of Tyre, Buran - now disguised as a young man named Nasir - succeeds in her goal, becoming a wealthy merchant, and the friend of Mahmud, the son of the Wali of Tyre. But is friendship enough for "Nasir" and Mahmud? And how will Buran fare when she meets her arrogant cousins again - the seven sons of her father's brother, who showed such contempt for her and her sisters, when they were still poor...?

Apparently based upon a well-known Iraqi folktale, first recorded in the eleventh century, Seven Daughters and Seven Sons is a story I have enjoyed reading many times, since first picking it up more than a decade ago. Although I did not first encounter it in youth, I suspect that if I had, I would have considered it a favorite. Told from alternating perspectives - first Buran's, then Mahmud's, then Buran's again - the story is immediately and lastingly engrossing, and although there are few surprises, it is ultimately quite satisfying to watch Buran succeed at her goal, and get her heart's desire as well. American author Barbara Cohen has produced many children's books, but her co-author, expatriate Iraqi Bahija Lovejoy, only ever produced this book, and a few others, which look to be non-fiction. I rather wish that this team had produced more - perhaps another tale based on Iraqi lore? However that may be, I'm grateful they did write Seven Daughters and Seven Sons, which I reread from time to time, when in need of a comfort read. Recommended to anyone looking for fiction based on folklore, or to those seeking children's fiction set in the Middle East and/or featuring strong girl characters. ( )
  AbigailAdams26 | Aug 9, 2019 |
Based on an 11th Century Iraqi oral folk tale, this is a story of a young woman from a family of six other sisters, a family who is shunned on account of not having any sons. This young woman disguises herself and ventures out into a man's world to seek her fortune as a trader, and to bring honor to her father. This is akin to Queen Scheherazade's 'ploy' in '1001 Tales of the Arabian Nights', in that a woman's intuitiveness and intelligence should never be underestimated. I have a particular fondness for fairy tales and folklore, and so enjoyed this simple story very much. ( )
  MomsterBookworm | Jul 14, 2014 |
I had never heard this story before so I can't say how well it was done compared to the original folktale, but I enjoyed this. It felt like something I would have read when I was younger, like Aesop's Fables or such, but I enjoyed the Arab setting which is a change of pace for me. ( )
  emmytuck | Sep 27, 2013 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 11 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
sem críticas | adicionar uma crítica

» Adicionar outros autores (9 possíveis)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Barbara Cohenautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculated
Cohen, Barbaraautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Lovejoy, Bahijaautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Hyman, Trina SchartArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Locais importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Acontecimentos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Prémios e menções honrosas
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
These are the words written long ago by Buran, daughter of Malik, a poor shopkeeper of Baghdad.
Citações
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
How could such a thing be kept secret?
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
(Carregue para mostrar. Atenção: Pode conter revelações sobre o enredo.)
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Língua original
DDC/MDS canónico
Canonical LCC

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

A retelling of a traditional Arabic tale in which a young woman disguises herself as a man and opens up a shop in a distant city in order to help her impoverished family.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Capas populares

Ligações Rápidas

Avaliação

Média: (4.28)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3 12
3.5 3
4 25
4.5 3
5 37

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 163,384,370 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível