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Capital: Volume 1: A Critique of Political…
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Capital: Volume 1: A Critique of Political Economy (Penguin Classics) (original 1867; edição 1992)

por Karl Marx (Autor), Ben Fowkes (Tradutor), Ernest Mandel (Introdução)

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2,203195,276 (4.12)20
One of the most notorious works of modern times, as well as one of the most influential, Capital is an incisive critique of private property and the social relations it generates. Living in exile in England, where this work was largely written, Marx drew on a wide-ranging knowledge of its society to support his analysis and generate fresh insights. Arguing that capitalism would create an ever-increasing division in wealth and welfare, he predicted its abolition and replacement by a system with common ownership of the means of production. Capital rapidly acquired readership among the leaders of social democratic parties, particularly in Russia and Germany, and ultimately throughout the world, to become a work described by Marx's friend and collaborator Friedrich Engels as 'the Bible of the Working Class'… (mais)
Membro:Loonarchist
Título:Capital: Volume 1: A Critique of Political Economy (Penguin Classics)
Autores:Karl Marx (Autor)
Outros autores:Ben Fowkes (Tradutor), Ernest Mandel (Introdução)
Informação:Penguin Classics (1992), Edition: Illustrated, 1152 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:*****
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Pormenores da obra

Capital, Vol. 1: A Critique of Political Economy por Karl Marx (Author) (1867)

  1. 04
    Capitalism and the Historians por F. A. Hayek (Utilizador anónimo)
  2. 05
    Economics in One Lesson por Henry Hazlitt (mcaution)
    mcaution: Economics is haunted by more fallacies than any other study known to man. Hazlitt intends to correct this injustice.
  3. 09
    Capitalism: The Unknown Ideal (original 1966 edition) por Ayn Rand (mcaution)
    mcaution: Proven time and again from an economic standpoint, Rand provides a much needed defense of capitalism from the philosophic.
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  Murtra | Jun 23, 2021 |
i will never finish even this VOLUME of capital in my whole god damn life but from what i've read and what i've learned from classes on the book it is INSANE the amount of big brain energy that went into this book. this is the original and probably only text that fundamentally breaks down every single detail of capital production and dissects it, takes it apart bit by bit, and shits on it. absolutely enlightening and a monument to the power of the human mind. little long but it wasn't really meant to be digestible, just authentic. ( )
  ncharlt1 | Oct 11, 2020 |
Marx started work on Capital in 1851, the date of the great Industrial Exhibition which provided Victorian England with a suitable opportunity for celebrating the peaceful conquests of free trade. The bulk of Capital took shape in the 1860s. When the first volume of Capital was published in 1867, the liberal era was at its height. When Engels published the last volume in 1894, Britain was witnessing a significant slackening of the characteristic Victorian optimism. The Marxian system has much in common with other creations of the Victorian age.

Marx’s analysis of the emergence of capitalism at first sight looks like ordinary economic history, and indeed it is the common view that Marx was really an economic historian who unfortunately coupled his investigations with a doctrinaire theory of economics properly so called. Large stretches of his chief work can in fact be subsumed under the general heading of economic history, notably those sections of Capital, Volume 1, where he goes into the genesis of what he termed “primitive accumulation.” Nonetheless one cannot really separate Marx the historian from Marx the economist, for the good reason that his definition of capitalism as a working system is itself historical. Not only did he stress its roots in bourgeois society, but he insisted that “capital” and “labor” were historical factors, in the sense that a major socio-historical revolution was needed to bring them into being. The proletariat and the bourgeoisie (the latter term referring to the capitalist stratum which took the place of the medieval guild artisans and small scale manufacturers) had come into being through a process in which the majority of producers were forcibly separated from their tools. “Primitive accumulation” thus constituted a social revolution. This general thesis on primitive accumulation has never been seriously disputed, and perhaps the only thing remaining to be said is that Western economists have been strangely reluctant to make use of it in analyzing the imposition of industrialism under non-capitalist regimes.

From a theoretical standpoint the significant question is whether Marx was successful in linking the economic logic of the process to its historical environment. What caused primitive accumulation to take a form that resulted in full-fledged capitalism establishing itself in Western Europe? Schumpeter has suggested that on the Marxian view it is essential for the logic of capitalism, and not only a matter of fact, that it grew out of the feudal state of society. However, this is not borne out by a careful examination of Marx’s writings. On the whole it would appear that he was not, in this part of his work, trying to lay down a general law. Certainly there is no suggestion in his mature writings that the feudal system is bound, from a kind of inner logic, to sprout capitalist tendencies. The conclusion cannot be avoided that Marx regarded European capitalism as a unique social formation.

Even the briefest outline of Capital would fill a volume.[1961]
  GLArnold | Aug 30, 2020 |
Critica de la Economía Política.
Libro I. El proceso de producción del capital
  Chule | Apr 11, 2020 |
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» Adicionar outros autores (94 possíveis)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Marx, KarlAutorautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Engels, FrederickEditorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Aveling, EdwardTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Fowkes, BenTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Hoare, QuintinGeneral editorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Korsch, KarlIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Livingstone, RodneyAppendix translatorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Mandel, ErnestIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Moore, SamuelTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
New Left ReviewNotesautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

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The wealth of those societies in which the capitalist mode of production prevails, presents itself as "an immense accumulation of commodities,"[1] its unit being a single commodity.
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In the United States of North America, every independent movement of the workers was paralysed so long as slavery disfigured a part of the Republic. Labour cannot emancipate itself in the white skin where in the black it is branded. -- Chapter 10
Capital is dead labor, which, vampire-like, lives only by sucking living labor, and lives the more, the more labor it sucks. -- Chapter 10
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One of the most notorious works of modern times, as well as one of the most influential, Capital is an incisive critique of private property and the social relations it generates. Living in exile in England, where this work was largely written, Marx drew on a wide-ranging knowledge of its society to support his analysis and generate fresh insights. Arguing that capitalism would create an ever-increasing division in wealth and welfare, he predicted its abolition and replacement by a system with common ownership of the means of production. Capital rapidly acquired readership among the leaders of social democratic parties, particularly in Russia and Germany, and ultimately throughout the world, to become a work described by Marx's friend and collaborator Friedrich Engels as 'the Bible of the Working Class'

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