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The hollow man por John Dickson Carr
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The hollow man (original 1935; edição 1951)

por John Dickson Carr

Séries: Doctor Gideon Fell (6)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
6582326,063 (3.77)48
Professor Charles Grimaud was explaining to some friends the natural causes behind an ancient superstition about men leaving their coffins when a stranger entered and challenged Grimaud's scepticism. The stranger asserted that he had risen from his own coffin and that four walls meant nothing to him. He added, 'My brother can do more... he wants your life and will call on you!' The brother came during a snowstorm, walked through the locked front door, shot Grimaud and vanished. The tragedy brought Dr Gideon Fell into the bizarre mystery of a killer who left no footprints.… (mais)
Membro:JanAyres
Título:The hollow man
Autores:John Dickson Carr
Informação:Penguin Books in association with H.Hamilton (1951), Paperback, 256 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Crime fiction (English)

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The Three Coffins por John Dickson Carr (1935)

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Mostrando 1-5 de 23 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
It's been ages since I read a mystery. I forgot how like a puzzle they are. This one was fun, sexist as one might expect for the period, but clever. I read this one as The Three Coffins, which I think is the US title. ( )
  ImperfectCJ | Sep 29, 2020 |
Even though I was having eye problems last night, I stupidly stayed up to finish this book. It was so good. So many twists and turns and a perfect locked room murder mystery. It reminded me a bit of "The Tokyo Zodiac Murders" as well as "The Murder at the Vicarage" that you have something that is supposedly impossible, becoming possible. The ending was top notch with all revealed after two (I think there were two) red herrings. Loved this book.

Professor Charles Grimaud is confronted by a mysterious man come across him and soem of his friends who claims that men can arise from the grave and walk through walls. Not going to lie here, was a bit confused where Carr was taking us. But all is explained later on to my and potential readers satisfaction.

The man, illusionist Pierre Fley claims that he himself has arisen from a grave and threatens Grimaud by saying that his brother wants him dead. We then follow a few days later and found that Grimaud has been shot and left to die in a room that a man entered and did not leave. When Dr. Gideon Fell and Superintendent Hadley come onto the scene, the question is how did the professor get shot and the would be murderer get away with no one seeing them? Also there are no footprints in the snow so how did the person get away? Did they fly? Believe me I spent most of this book trying out different solutions and was wrong with all of them. Good luck to you if you manage to figure this out.

I don't want to spoil anymore of the plot cause so much happens that at times you are going to go wait a minute? What? And have to go back and re-read.

I loved the writing though at times the story gets a bit bogged down with Fell trying to tell Hadley what he has wrong or telling Hadley that he himself was wrong. I maybe went what a few times. The flow gets better after we get to Grimaud being shot. Not going to lie, the first part confused the life out of me so had to start the story twice in order to get a better sense of people that were being named.

Carr includes diagrams of the room prior to the solution being provided and another diagram after the solution is provided which I totally got a kick out of.

The ending surprised the heck out of me though. I was expecting another paragraph or something, but nothing doing. ( )
  ObsidianBlue | Jul 1, 2020 |
I have remarked before in these pages of my surprise at the doggedness and sheer perseverance (or perhaps I mean simple lack of discernment) evinced by my younger reading self. As I grow older, I find myself re-reading books more frequently. Several times over the last few years I have gone back to a book of which I have fond memories from my first reading of it back in the distant days of my youth, only to find it evoking very different responses now.

Of course, that is sometimes merely a reflection of greater experience of life acquired in the interim, but there have been a substantial number of cases where I baulk in amazement that I ever managed to persevere through to the end, let alone manage that and emerge with positive memories.

This was one such case. I recall reading this perhaps thirty ... maybe nearer forty … years ago, at a period when I positively devoured traditional murder mysteries. John Dickson Carr is still esteemed as one of the masters of that particular genre, and this particular book is often cited as his masterpiece, and perhaps the apotheosis of the locked room mystery. Indeed, Dickson Carr devotes one whole chapter to a tutorial on the locked room mystery, delivered by his learned (and exceptionally self-regarding) avatar, Dr Gideon Fell who was protagonist of most of his novels.

I was prompted top reread this after having enjoyed Peter Lovesey’s novel, Bloodhounds, in which his own less cerebral but immensely more pragmatic protagonist, Superintendent Peter Diamond, is faced with a locked room mystery of his own. Lovesey, a prolific and masterful writer of crime fiction himself, ventures into metafiction in Bloodhounds as the victim and field of suspects are all members of a society which meets regularly to discuss their own respective views about crime fiction. The murder, or at least the first of them, confronting Diamond is consciously modelled on events in Dickson Carr’s The Hollow man.

Unfortunately, far from encountering the nostalgic treat that I was anticipating, I found this book very turgid, and written with a self-congratulatory air that I found positively repellent. It has not aged well. Yes, the plot is very cleverly constructed, but the whole book is presented as a simple demonstration of how clever Gideon Fell and John Dickson Carr both are. There is a strong carapace of smugness that I struggled to penetrate.

I don’t think that this is simply a reflection of the book’s age. I have recently reread a few books of similar vintage by the likes of Agatha Christie and Ngaio Marsh, and while it is clear that they hail from a different time, I have had no problems enjoying them for what they are. Anytway, whatever the underlying reason, I will not be revisiting any more of John Dickson Carr’s books for quite a while. ( )
  Eyejaybee | Apr 9, 2020 |
I used to love Gideon Fell books, having first come across them in my early twenties. Something has gone wrong, though.
Maybe I just got tired of the terrific stretching of reality required to set up the locked-room mysteries, of which Carr was the acknowledged master. Or maybe I’ve outgrown the ponderous musings of Dr. Fell. I’m not sure exactly what it is, but the bloom’s surely gone off this rose.
Anyway, a man is killed in a locked room, with no visible evidence of anyone possibly being able to enter or leave the room. Then another man is shot in the middle of a deserted cul-de-sac, at night, with no one near him. Plenty of suspects, and a bizarre and creepy backstory keep this one from being a total snoozer.
But it could be me. The “challenge “ of this story is so far-fetched that the sharpest reader will only dimly see what’s going on. If you like locked-room mysteries, try “Hag’s Nook”, “The Man Who Could Not Shudder,” or “The Problem of the Wire Cage,” all by this author, first. They’re much more approachable and fun. ( )
  bohemima | Jul 29, 2018 |
The Hollow Man is possibly the most famous locked room mystery ever written. Published in 1935, it is also perhaps John Dickson Carr’s most influential work. In the US, it is known as The Three Coffins.

A fellow mystery buff praised this book to such an extent, that I had to read it just to see what is so unique about it.

The narrative, though interesting in places, is rather dull. I found it to be monotonous after a while.

Some of the characters are interesting. But most of them are rather predictable. Hadley is the gruff, no nonsense police man who doesn’t believe in all that supernatural mambo jumbo. Dr. Fell is the old all knowing gentleman; etc.

But what exactly is the purpose of the character Rampole? He sees this, he hears that. Couldn’t these things have been just written instead of having him around? His wife is another unnecessary character. I found the scenes in which these two discuss the case absolutely futile.

This book’s most celebrated aspect is the "locked room lecture" given by Dr. Fell. He describes the wide-ranging ways to commit a murder in a locked-room or an impossible-crime situation. I really enjoyed this part of the book. Especially when he gives examples of several famous murder mysteries. It was fun for me identifying all of the stories I’ve read among them.

One little problem I had with the book (which may seem quite silly) is that even though the language is satisfyingly good, words that describe noises of laughter or annoyance or any other emotion (words such as 'Harrumph!' and 'Heh - heh – heh.') are used too frequently. It takes away from the seriousness of the plot.

The end was very clever. But it is rather complicated. Perhaps it’s too clever.

I enjoyed The Hollow Man but only in parts. Not one of the best mysteries I’ve ever read. But definitely not terrible either. ( )
  Porua | Apr 25, 2018 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 23 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Carr boasts that he has devised over eighty different solutions to the locked-room puzzle, and in one of the novels Fell, a monologist with the best of them, delivers a fascinating lecture on the subject. This is The Three Coffins, to quote the inexcusable American retitling of the British edition The Hollow Man, which perfectly suggests the macabre menace of the story. That man must indeed have been hollow who, watched of course by a responsible and innocent witness, was seen to enter a room without other access in which, later, there is found the corpse of the room’s occupant, but of course no hollow man. This is Chestertonian, or Brownian, though its explanation has a Carrian validity.
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Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Carr, John Dicksonautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Bocchino, Maria LuisaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Roth, RogerArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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To the murder of Professor Grimaud, and later the equally incredible crime in Cagliostro Street, many fantastic terms could be applied - with reason.
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Known as The Three Coffins in the US
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Professor Charles Grimaud was explaining to some friends the natural causes behind an ancient superstition about men leaving their coffins when a stranger entered and challenged Grimaud's scepticism. The stranger asserted that he had risen from his own coffin and that four walls meant nothing to him. He added, 'My brother can do more... he wants your life and will call on you!' The brother came during a snowstorm, walked through the locked front door, shot Grimaud and vanished. The tragedy brought Dr Gideon Fell into the bizarre mystery of a killer who left no footprints.

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