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Freedom (TM) (Daemon Series) por Daniel…
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Freedom (TM) (Daemon Series) (original 2010; edição 2011)

por Daniel Suarez (Autor)

Séries: Daemon (2)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
1,1575212,555 (4.04)23
The propulsive, shockingly plausible sequel to "New York Times" bestseller "Daemon, Freedom" features a world of rapidly diminishing human power, where what's at stake is nothing less than humanity's survival.
Membro:_rixx_
Título:Freedom (TM) (Daemon Series)
Autores:Daniel Suarez (Autor)
Informação:Dutton (2011), Edition: Reprint, 486 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:*****
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

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Freedom™ por Daniel Suarez (2010)

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» Ver também 23 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 52 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
A great follow up book to Daemon. Your finally get to see what the actions taken in the first book are all about and how society is going to be thrown on it's head once the full picture is revealed. Daniel Suarez definitely has a way about him that gets you thinking about technology and how possible it is for the system we know today to be a thing of the past. ( )
  sjh4255 | May 4, 2021 |
Should be one book with Daemon. Together, one of my 10 favorite sci fi novels of all time. ( )
  octal | Jan 1, 2021 |
Unabashed wish fulfilment fantasy, the first scene of which pretty much sets the tone for the rest of the book by slaughtering a banker. A lovely feel good story wrapped around a techno-thriller that unlike all the other ones actually makes sense from the technical point of view because the author clearly knows what he's writing about. There's still hand wavy minority report augmented reality interfaces and other over the top nonsense but it's pretty rare to read something this technically coherent. ( )
  TeaTimeCoder | Dec 23, 2020 |
Despite some technical errors, terminology errors, economic errors, problems with composition of sentences and paragraphs, moments of just crappy prose, events and story conceits so wildly improbable as to be effectively impossible, and instances of weirdly shoehorned-in ideological blindness, this book was overall great. It builds on the foundation laid in Daemon to get to the meat, even the heart, of the matter. The number of times I found myself thinking "I do not think that word means what you think it means!" is more than balanced by the times I found myself thinking "Damn, Daniel Suarez really gets a lot of what's at the heart of the system's problems." Like almost everyone, he incautiously and (arguably) erroneously uses terms like "democracy" and "free market" and so on. Unlike almost everyone, though, he focuses red dot sights squarely on the foreheads of some of the worst problems (and problem people) in the world, even if in the end he excuses some of them for their conventionally respected roles in making the meat grinder of our political systems work.

Much like Homebrew Industrial Revolution, the combination of Daemon and Freedom™ provides a lot of thought-provoking material for those ready to see the writing on the wall. Also much like Homebrew Industrial Revolution, it suffers a bit from ideological preoccupations that detract slightly from the strength of the message and inject some incoherence into an otherwise reasonably tightly plotted tale. It is, in some respects, like a science-fictional, high-adventure novelization of the points made by Homebrew Industrial Revolution -- both the good points (which are strong and numerous) and the bad (which are relatively weak and few), though I don't recall off the top of my head actual technical errors in Homebrew Industrial Revolution like those that, at times, litter Daniel's writing.

Given the short bio of the author, referring to consulting work involving enterprise software systems for government and corporate clients, I find myself wondering just how little knowledge of the wide array of information technologies in play one really needs to possess to make money in the enterprise consulting realm. He definitely seems to have learned a thing or two about how his clients are fucking up the world, though. I wish more people in the high-power white-collar world would see the rot festering at the heart of our subsidized, forcibly redistributive corporate culture like he evidently does. ( )
  apotheon | Dec 14, 2020 |
After cruising through Daemon in about 2 days, Freedom™ was even quicker: I blew through it in about 24 hours (back in May). That’s no knock against it, though; rather, I just couldn’t put it down at all.

This review will be brief, even though it’s taken me almost three months to get around to finishing it. Basically, if Daemon was the end of the beginning, Freedom™ is the beginning of the end. Or at least of the next step. It lays out the climactic struggle much more succinctly, a titanic clash between people and business, corporate and individual. I found this particular passage most instructive:

"You, sir, are walking on a privately owned Main Street—permission to trespass revocable at will. Read the plaque on the ground at the entrance if you don’t believe me. These people aren’t citizens of anything, Sergeant. America is just another brand purchased for its goodwill value. For that excellent fucking logo … No conspiracy necessary. It’s a process that’s been happening for thousands of years. Wealth aggregates and becomes political power. Simple as that. ‘Corporation’ is just the most recent name for it. In the Middle Ages it was the Catholic Church. They had a great logo, too. You might have seen it, and they had more branches than Starbucks. Go back before that, and it was Imperial Rome. It’s a natural process as old as humanity."

Of course, overreach leads to retreat and retrenchment, et cetera, et cetera. Even if the message seems a little obvious (and by no means subtly presented), it’s an important one, and it’s framed in an interesting new way. It’s that presentation that makes this not only legible, but well worth your time, if not just to see what the traditional cries of anticonsumerism and Adbusters-type activism look like in the digital age.

John Robb’s ‘holons‘ take some big strides here too; Suarez has done an excellent job of envisioning the resilient community concept, and doing so in a way that makes them seem not only possible, but inevitable. A blueprint for the future? Not necessarily. But at the least, a realistic portrayal of the kind of decentralized communities that we’ll hopefully be migrating to in the future. Thanks to Daniel Suarez, they’re more than just a concept.

So read Daemon and then read Freedom™. Seriously, you won’t be disappointed. And even if you are, ignore the prose and focus on the message – it’s one we sorely need to listen to right now. ( )
  goliathonline | Jul 7, 2020 |
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» Adicionar outros autores (6 possíveis)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Daniel Suarezautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculated
Gurner, JeffNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

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The propulsive, shockingly plausible sequel to "New York Times" bestseller "Daemon, Freedom" features a world of rapidly diminishing human power, where what's at stake is nothing less than humanity's survival.

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