Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquisar O Sítio Web
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

A Bali Conspiracy Most Foul: Inspector Singh…
A carregar...

A Bali Conspiracy Most Foul: Inspector Singh Investigates (original 2009; edição 2011)

por Shamini Flint (Autor)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
14312147,932 (3.5)3
Inspector Singh is back, but this time on secondment to Bali. A bomb has exploded and Singh has been sent to help with anti-terrorism efforts. But there's a slight problem: he knows squat about hunting terrorists. He's much better suited to solving murder! So when a body is discovered in the wreckage, killed by a bullet before the bomb went off, Singh should be the one to find the answers - especially with the help of a wily Australian copper by his side. But simple murders are never as simple as they seem - and this one has far-reaching global consequences . . .… (mais)
Membro:hansel714
Título:A Bali Conspiracy Most Foul: Inspector Singh Investigates
Autores:Shamini Flint (Autor)
Informação:Minotaur Books (2011), Edition: Reprint, 304 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:***
Etiquetas:indonesia

Pormenores da obra

A Bali Conspiracy Most Foul: Inspector Singh Investigates por Shamini Flint (2009)

Nenhum(a)
A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Ver também 3 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 12 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
The novel's opening text allows the reader to eavesdrop on the vacillating inner thoughts of a young jihadist as he waits for the final command to carry out a suicide bombing--not what I was expecting, but my attention has been captured.

It's a fairly intense read, and the author seems to possess a solid understanding of the jihadi mindset. Inspector Singh isn't a particularly likable character, but he is good at his job. There are several surprises in the plot, and a climatic ending. ( )
  MadMaudie | Sep 5, 2020 |
I picked this as a fun read for a trip to Bali. A mystery set in a country that I was visiting -- what could be more fun? And to be honest, if I hadn’t spent two spectacular weeks in Bali, I would have found it a light and informative mystery. The plot revolves around a body found among the debris of the Bali nightclub bombings. But this man was not killed by the bomb, but a bullet to the head, and the bumbling inspector Singh is sent from Singapore to Bali to not find the terrorists who planned the bombing, but the person who murdered the victim. There is a lot that is interesting in this story. It’s a whodunit with very colorful characters – an Islamic terrorist cell who hold a hatred for the US and the ways of the west, the international police force sent to find the bombers, and a host of local Balinese, ranging from drivers, to shop keepers, to the local police. My big gripe with this story is that the Balinese are portrayed as kind, helpful, but slightly incompetent and very superstitious. It’s clear that the westerners view the Balinese Hindu rituals to cleanse the dark evil from the bomb as silly and slightly juvenile. There was a condescension of western superiority that I disliked. It felt similar to how old American westerns portray Native Americans. And although my experience with the Balinese was limited, the story definitely didn’t show the warmth and the hospitality that this island exudes. The same could be said for the terrorists. Their motive for the bombings was never explained, making it feel like this could be any group of Indonesian Muslims.
It made me wonder if the author ever had spent time in Bali. We don’t need more stories that stereotype other cultures. ( )
  jmoncton | Jan 11, 2020 |
Still trying to get rid of him, Inspector Singh's superiors send him to Bali as a show of solidarity after the 2002 Bali bombing even though he has no terrorism experience. But then a victim's skull is found with a bullet hole -- obviously the man had been murdered before the bomb went off. Inspector Singh can investigate murder with the not always welcome help of an Australian colleague.

I enjoyed the relationship between Singh and Bronwyn, the Australian policewoman. It's a pity we won't be seeing more of her. Some nicely unpleasant suspects even if the ending was mostly rather predictable. ( )
  Robertgreaves | Oct 13, 2016 |
Originally posted on my blog

I used to avoid the crime/mystery shelves at the library. You could find me in fiction, non-fiction, science fiction and fantasy, magazines etc but not the crime/mystery sections. Not until recently.



Perhaps I was unsure of where to begin, which series were good, which writers actually wrote well instead of just churning out book after book in factory-style mass production.

So I’ve been playing catch up.

Partly because of the very many series that have come from countries afar. Like Iceland or Sweden. And in this case, Southeast Asia.

Flint has created an interesting, somewhat different policeman in Inspector Singh, who hails from Singapore and is too fond of his food, resulting in a rather portly figure. Authoritative and imposing, but a little on the round side.

“Singh took a deep breath. He smelt the spicy warm scent of ikan bakar, fish wrapped in banana leaf, on the hotel barbecue. His nostril hairs quivered appreciatively. Wherever he was, the smell of cooking food was always enticing. Singh grimaced – even by his own standards it seemed callous to be longing for dinner at such a time. His ample stomach immediately protested his conclusion, rumbling like a distant storm. The policeman shrugged and ordered a cold Bintang beer and a nasi goreng. After all, one had to eat. He wouldn’t be helping anyone by eschewing food. Not, he thought ruefully, that he was helping anyone anyway.”

Inspector Singh is the Singapore Police Force’s representative in Bali after the aftermath of the Sari Club bombings (based on the real 2002 bombings which killed 202 people and injured many more).

This is rather curious as he is no terrorism expert but an investigator of murders (Singapore has to keep its terrorism experts around to protect its own shores).

And conveniently, there is a murder for Singh to solve.

For the police have found the skull fragment of a man who was killed before the bomb went off.

A fun read, set against a bit of a grim background. It isn’t quite hard to see where the story is going despite the myriad of characters that Flint tosses in (perhaps one too many?). But Inspector Singh, “a throwback to the old school – hardworking, hard-drinking, chain-smoking”, not to mention food-loving, makes for an amusing character whose cases take him to unusual and refreshing locations – in terms of crime series at least – as the series is set mostly in Southeast Asia.

You know, I just realised that I have read this series out of order. Silly me. Still it works fine on its own, and it didn’t feel like I was reading the second book in a series (which is probably why I only realised it now) and now I’m curious to see how the first book, A Most Peculiar Malaysian Murder, will work having read the second one!

I am guessing that I wouldn’t fare too well as a police inspector….


( )
  RealLifeReading | Jan 19, 2016 |
This book is the second in a series featuring irascible and portly Sikh Detective Inspector Singh. I was only mildly interested in the first one, A Peculiar Malaysian Murder, but when I saw this was set in Bali I decided to give Shamini Flint one more chance. I'm glad I did because I enjoyed this mystery much more than the first one I read. Flint sets a murder mystery in the debris and aftermath of the horrific real-life Bali bombings that occurred in October 2002 when 202 people were killed when three bombs were detonated.

Singh finds himself paired up with Bronwyn Taylor, a policewoman in the Australian Federal Police that Singh initially finds annoying and tiresome. Taylor has little experience with murder investigations, but like Singh, she has been sidelined by her superiors. She and Singh find themselves working together to investigate the bullet-holed bones found at the bombsite. Since they can't be much help on the terror investigation they decide to find out who used the bombings to cover up a murder.

The plot is a clever mix of fact and fiction, with some of the characters' names resembling those eventually convicted of the bombings. The author does a good job of describing why the bombings happened and how ordinary people were caught up in them. I liked the fleshing out of Inspector Singh much better than in the first book. Bronwyn Taylor, the Australian policewoman, comes over well as both compassionate and conscientious, and she and Singh make a good team. Even though it deals with a horrific real life event, I would still categorize it as a fairly light read that definitely enjoyable. ( )
  Olivermagnus | Jan 17, 2016 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 12 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
sem críticas | adicionar uma crítica

Belongs to Series

Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Locais importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Acontecimentos importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Filmes relacionados
Prémios e menções honrosas
Epígrafe
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.
-- W. B. Yeats
Dedicatória
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
For the Major
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Jimi's hands were clammy. There were damp handprints on the fake leather of the steering wheel.
Citações
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
(Carregue para mostrar. Atenção: Pode conter revelações sobre o enredo.)
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Língua original
DDC/MDS canónico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês (2)

Inspector Singh is back, but this time on secondment to Bali. A bomb has exploded and Singh has been sent to help with anti-terrorism efforts. But there's a slight problem: he knows squat about hunting terrorists. He's much better suited to solving murder! So when a body is discovered in the wreckage, killed by a bullet before the bomb went off, Singh should be the one to find the answers - especially with the help of a wily Australian copper by his side. But simple murders are never as simple as they seem - and this one has far-reaching global consequences . . .

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Ligações Rápidas

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (3.5)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 2
2.5 1
3 12
3.5 3
4 13
4.5 3
5 2

GenreThing

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 159,180,554 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível